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Failed University
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A bit about me...

I was diagnosed with autism when young. I have mostly recovered through a long and tedious home program along with daily supplementation of Kirkman Super Nu Thera caplets. I'm 20 years old.

I have been gluten free for > 10 years.

I've had a healthy 10 years on the diet until about a year ago while I was away at university at college and decided to spend lots money on lollies.

(below I'll talk about how this started)...

The kitchen staff at my hall were really careless about the gluten cross-contamination and I told them very regularly about how serious the CC issue is. The head chef made some pretty rude remarks, particularly when I asked about the deep fryer situation at college. ("Look, mate! That very little bit of gluten honestly shouldn't hurt.") (this was about 2 years ago).

One reason I decided not to press the issue is because I tend to be a fairly easy person to please and I generally don't tend to want to be a hassle for anyone else. People describe me as a gentle and compassionate person and I didn't want to change that. I figured that if I at least tried to be gluten free (i.e. not intentionally ingest gluten), I'd be fine.

Slowly but surely over the first several months while at this college away from home I started to get increased abdominal discomfort and brain fog. I tried to not be accusatory so I would often try and blame it on something else (like sugar, spices, etc.)

The food issues aside... I also stopped taking the Kirkman Super Nu Thera caplets on an every day basis (that I had been doing for most of my life) about a year ago. I read somewhere online that taking high quantities of B6 may negatively affect me and cause nerve damage. I was taking 10 caplets (5 in the morning, 5 in the evening) as this was the single thing that made the greatest difference in my development and relative recovery from the ASD.

At first I felt better, my kidneys seemed to be more at ease as I took the caplets less frequently. This was in September, 2011.

On the other hand, I noticed I was feeling sick and tired a lot when I ate the meals at my residential college (prepared by the aforementioned kitchen staff). I now suspect that gluten contamination had something to do with it.

I also found that I was behaving abhorrently in many aspects once I got completely off the Kirkman Super Nu Thera caplets altogether (January 2012). In some ways my kidneys seemed to feel better but my urine was becoming very foamy (toward the end of May 2012). I had terrible GI discomfort and couldn't think one bit clearly at all. :huh:

I was also getting really sick and didn't know why. I immediately got back onto the b6 super nu thera megadose and took the 5 morning and 5 evening protocol and within a few days the foam in my urine cleared up (maybe there's a connection between the body and autism here??).

Now back to the food...

But I was still sick (end May, early June). It was interesting because in the past every time I went home for holidays and my mother cooked for me for the few weeks break I would gradually feel better again so that by the time uni started I would be back in order.

But this time things just got really out of hand for me and I fell apart. My dorm room was a mess, I lost friends and I was a in quite a mental mess. I failed all of my courses for the whole semester and due to a previously poor academic record at university (probably partly due to the food and autism issues) I will probably never be able to attend university again. I have been kicked out.

Has anyone here had a similar experience? I'm in the process of trying to find a job and am back home and really discouraged. Any advice or warm words of encouragement or others' venting and understanding would be appreciated.

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Well, this is the first post which I copied from the forum. I think it shows what continous small amounts of cross contamination can do. I think it shows me that diligence is necessary. One must either cook it themself, or you do have to be informing others with some degree of force. My current plan is not to let anyone cook for me outside of my home.

I wanted to add that others may not understand, but I being a Celiac can see that this could happen. It sure is hard to think, remember, and produce when one has fatigue and fogginess.

Sorry you went through this. Now, I hope you will get control of your diet and your body. Then I hope you will find a school that will take you. Maybe near home, so momma could cook. I recommend College Plus if you can. It might depend on how much college you finished successfully and a host of other things.

I hope you will work hard and one day have that college diploma. Keep us posted.

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Your post made me very sad. I feel that your university failed YOU and not the other way around. They poisoned you! Your tuition and room/board $$ should all be returned to you, and they should send a letter of apology. Of course, this is the real world....and you'll never see these things, but please know that that would be the RIGHT and FAIR thing for them to do. Are there no laws in your country that would serve to protect you in such circumstances? Was the university not obligated to feed you properly? From your statements, I gather that you may live in Australia, New Zealand, or England, but I could be wrong. Aren't people with disabilities given some type of accommodation in your country?

In the interim, perhaps you could investigate an online university to get you back on track. And, during your job search, please be careful to avoid any place where wheat is present. Once your brain fog is gone and your strength returns, I hope a plan of action will be apparent to you...but you'll need to plan carefully. I do wish you all the best--you sound like a very nice, genuinely caring person, and you don't deserve to have these types of setbacks.

Regarding your urine, I would like to encourage you to see a specialist about it. You may be experiencing a health issue unrelated to gluten that is affecting your health. What you describe is NOT normal, and a urologist may be able to help you. Please do not delay in contacting a doctor NOW--these types of matters can be very serious....but easily resolved. Here's a link to the Mayo Clinic where foamy urine is discussed--it indicates that there may be too much protein in your urine:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/foamy-urine/AN01702

Good luck to you!

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Sorry you went through this. Now, I hope you will get control of your diet and your body. Then I hope you will find a school that will take you. Maybe near home, so momma could cook. I recommend College Plus if you can. It might depend on how much college you finished successfully and a host of other things.

I hope you will work hard and one day have that college diploma. Keep us posted.

Thank you for your kind words. It has been a struggle. I will definitely try and stay near home where my mum can cook. She's gluten-free as well. I'm in the land 'down under'.

I thought that when going down south for uni, at one of the best universities in the country, I'd be fine and the kitchen staff would have it together. It was a smaller residential college too, so I'm dumbfounded as to why they didn't do a better job accommodating my requirements. :rolleyes:

Your post made me very sad. I feel that your university failed YOU and not the other way around. They poisoned you!

Yes, I'm sure what you're saying is true (at least to some degree). I know for a fact that while I did everything I could to make sure I wasn't wilfully ingesting gluten, I also messed up in another area (not taking my B6 like I should have is probably a major factor). I was also going into town for lollies in the evenings as I mentioned before.

Unlike a portion of students, I have never been big on the alcohol, booze or anything like that. I have yet to be drunk so at least I accomplished that much. Yet I trashed myself on lollies. :(

All I can remember is that it was difficult for me to think on a straight line when I had constant abdominal pain.

Your tuition and room/board $$ should all be returned to you, and they should send a letter of apology. Of course, this is the real world....and you'll never see these things, but please know that that would be the RIGHT and FAIR thing for them to do. Are there no laws in your country that would serve to protect you in such circumstances? Was the university not obligated to feed you properly? From your statements, I gather that you may live in Australia, New Zealand, or England, but I could be wrong. Aren't people with disabilities given some type of accommodation in your country?

In the interim, perhaps you could investigate an online university to get you back on track. And, during your job search, please be careful to avoid any place where wheat is present. Once your brain fog is gone and your strength returns, I hope a plan of action will be apparent to you...but you'll need to plan carefully. I do wish you all the best--you sound like a very nice, genuinely caring person, and you don't deserve to have these types of setbacks.

As I mentioned (more subtlety above ;)) I live in Australia. I'm sure that if I tried to make a stink about it, it would just simply be 'my word against theirs'. The kitchen staff have never admitted that they're wrong. Even when I insisted that a meal I ate at a previous session caused me a gluten-like reaction. They have had a lot of 'fad' dieters and a lot of students who are sensible and seemingly responsible often think of those needing to be gluten free as slightly 'mentally off' (which is probably true, if they're telling everyone they're gluten free but then knowingly munch on Tim Tams and regular crumpets on frequent occasions in front of these same people). A lot of these 'fashion-type' dieters who say they feel better on the gluten free diet but don't stick with it very well were still decent enough all round people (to me, anyway) so I didn't see any point getting off side with them. They seemed to respect the importance of my gluten-free needs but perhaps were giving a distorted view of what coeliac disease and gluten sensitivity are.

Currently I have no idea about what I want to do. I have registered with centrelink and applied for a disability support pension (due to my autism). I also mentioned my gluten intolerance. My mother, grandmother and some good friends of ours have found me to be very good at teaching (and explaining new concepts) and that maybe I could become a tutor. B)

Regarding your urine, I would like to encourage you to see a specialist about it. You may be experiencing a health issue unrelated to gluten that is affecting your health. What you describe is NOT normal, and a urologist may be able to help you. Please do not delay in contacting a doctor NOW--these types of matters can be very serious....but easily resolved. Here's a link to the Mayo Clinic where foamy urine is discussed--it indicates that there may be too much protein in your urine:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/foamy-urine/AN01702

Good luck to you!

I had my urine checked at the University Health Service the day after the evening when I had foam in my urine and everything appeared normal from what they could see. When I did an intestinal permeability urine test, I had mild to moderate leaky gut syndrome.

The foamy urine seemed to have something to do with a genetic weakness that apparently stops many autistic children from being able to clear toxins from their bodies when they don't take a B6 and B vitamin megadose. Seems like it's quite independent of the gluten intolerance and may have come from a different side of the family. I'm not sure... <_<

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Well, that sux. But you made a good try at doing it and that itself is worthwhile. Many people never even try difficult things, so making an attempt, even if you fail, is very worthwhile. It shows you have come courage and fortitude, or what is properly called gumption. You may have done just fine if you were in an environment that was truly gluten-free or if you made your own food instead of eating what the staff prepared. I found it very hard to concentrate and remember things when I was eating gluten years ago. Just being in pain constantly is very distracting and disturbing to the learning process.

But there is no law you can't try again right? Over here in the US of A we have community / technical colleges and trade schools. They often have classes aimed at older students who are starting a 2nd career. So their entrance requirements are very different and they pretty much take anyone who can pay. And they are not generally live in schools. You drive their and that means you can eat whatever you want, no meal plan. So maybe something like that would work. There are also internships available for some jobs. They don't usually pay much but are a good way to get experience.

So there may be some other options to think about.

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Thank you for your detailed responses, but those responses have made me think a bit. You express yourself EXTREMELY well, and you seem patient, understanding, and analytical. These skills are desperately needed in Sydney right now. My daughter lives in North Bondi and works in Sydney (I visit her every year and LOVE Australia), and her company has had a terrible time trying to find employees with your attributes. These are all skills needed for customer service jobs (my daughter works for a type of technology company), and currently the unemployment rate is so low in Australia, her company simply can't find employees to fill positions. I would assume that this is also the case with other Aussie companies.

When I've visited Sydney, I've been over-the-top happy about the gluten-free options and how carefully my meals are prepared. There's a Brazilian barbecue place downtown where almost every single option on the menu is gluten free, including the pasta and the cheese bread! At the Westfield Mall, the food court offers gluten-free pizza and other options. If I could choose to live anywhere in the world, I would choose Australia.

So...please don't sell yourself short. You have much to offer the business world! You would probably make a wonderful teacher with your skills and natural abilities; however, while you're going to school, I think you may have a great career in some type of customer service position--believe me when I say that exceptional writing and communication skills are very hard to find.

Take some time to recover, regain your confidence, make plans, and then take advantage of the opportunities that I know await you. I have no doubt that you will be successful.

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I'm really sorry about the hard time you had :-(

With regards to not being able to go back to uni, I gather you were "excluded" (for non-Aussies, this is a term they use when you drop out with fails and without following any of the procedures). That doesn't mean you are excluded for life, you just need to explain when you reapply what went wrong and that you're in a better position to be successful with study. I got excluded too when I dropped out suddenly when I was 19 but it was fine later when I reapplied and I was able to complete my degree. Have you considered doing distance education and staying at home? The University of New England are great for distance studies and there are other places too. I really enjoy distance education, I can work full time and fit in my studies. I've actually found it easier to get to know other students too because before we were all commuting and super busy (Australian unis don't tend to have the same community aspect, most students live at home and commute, or in shared flats. Living on campus is pretty rare).

Rose, the situation in Sydney hasn't been as great as it used to be, a lot of people have been laid off and we definitely get more applicants for any advertised positions than we used to. But there's still work available. It is a super expensive place to live as a student though. Paying sydney market rents on the types of jobs students get meant years of soul crushing poverty for me. So I wouldn't recommend a move here unless there was some support network in place.

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Thank you for your detailed responses, but those responses have made me think a bit. You express yourself EXTREMELY well, and you seem patient, understanding, and analytical. These skills are desperately needed in Sydney right now. My daughter lives in North Bondi and works in Sydney (I visit her every year and LOVE Australia), and her company has had a terrible time trying to find employees with your attributes. These are all skills needed for customer service jobs (my daughter works for a type of technology company), and currently the unemployment rate is so low in Australia, her company simply can't find employees to fill positions. I would assume that this is also the case with other Aussie companies.

Thank you so much for your encouraging words!!!

I'm not sure about Sydney (or NSW for that matter) but I know in Queensland there have been some real issues with employment (as of the last couple of months). Many people already with skills are jobless and even my parents and others in our family are half wondering about the stability of their own jobs.

There was argument within our family as to whether I should go through the disability umbrella for employment. Mother thought that there was absolutely no question but others were very much against it. They seemed to not want to acknowledge that I have special needs.

When I've visited Sydney, I've been over-the-top happy about the gluten-free options and how carefully my meals are prepared. There's a Brazilian barbecue place downtown where almost every single option on the menu is gluten free, including the pasta and the cheese bread! At the Westfield Mall, the food court offers gluten-free pizza and other options. If I could choose to live anywhere in the world, I would choose Australia.

Australia really does feel like home for us. Every time we've travelled overseas, gluten free options are always more limited. My mother is American and thus was aware of what was needed in a home program to help with my recovery from autism, and give me a chance for success at life.

I'd love to know of some of the gluten free places in Sydney that you've come across. Our family experiences there weren't that great (but that was some years ago). We found Brisbane to be far superior. Unfortunately, restaurants/cafes that offer gluten free options up north have become more scarce in the last few years.

But... there is a good cafe in on the River if you head up to North Queensland some time. They (currently, anyway) prepare cakes (most of which are gluten free), which are a real treat. Great to have them down the road from the new house we just bought (after moving from the Atherton Tableland region) and now that I'm home, I'll be able to enjoy going there on a regular basis which I missed while at college. :)

Please don't sell yourself short. You have much to offer the business world! You would probably make a wonderful teacher with your skills and natural abilities; however, while you're going to school, I think you may have a great career in some type of customer service position--believe me when I say that exceptional writing and communication skills are very hard to find.

Take some time to recover, regain your confidence, make plans, and then take advantage of the opportunities that I know await you. I have no doubt that you will be successful.

My Mum concurs with your suggestions. I had my interview for the disability support pension and once we hear back on that (which is likely to be several weeks from now), we'll be able to look at next steps.

Meanwhile, I'm at home and recovering well. I'm starting to regain that bit of weight I lost at college, and feeling a lot healthier. Which is what what I've wanted all along. :)

I'm really sorry about the hard time you had :-(

With regards to not being able to go back to uni, I gather you were "excluded" (for non-Aussies, this is a term they use when you drop out with fails and without following any of the procedures). That doesn't mean you are excluded for life, you just need to explain when you reapply what went wrong and that you're in a better position to be successful with study. I got excluded too when I dropped out suddenly when I was 19 but it was fine later when I reapplied and I was able to complete my degree. Have you considered doing distance education and staying at home? The University of New England are great for distance studies and there are other places too. I really enjoy distance education, I can work full time and fit in my studies. I've actually found it easier to get to know other students too because before we were all commuting and super busy (Australian unis don't tend to have the same community aspect, most students live at home and commute, or in shared flats. Living on campus is pretty rare).

Actually, I was one of the less common types of students (as you probably read above) that actually did attend a residential college.

As far my university record went, I began in 2010 and passed most of my first semester courses (followed by me failing most of my second semester courses). In 2011, I passed all of my first semester courses but then failed all of my second semester courses (as I noticed my health deteriorating) and was placed on academic probation. In 2012, I failed all of my first semester courses (with marks like 13 out of 100) and (as you quoted above) was excluded from the University and would have to show cause if I wished to continue my studies in that particular program.

I also gather that, reading between the lines, the admin staff (including sub deans) at my residential college were keen to see me go.

I didn't wish to go down the "self-catered" accommodation route because we worried that buying groceries and cooking meals would hinder my ability to concentrate on my studies. My heart didn't seem to be in it like it should have been and so I decided to "pull the pin" (so to speak) and come home.

I did well in my senior studies at high school, so I'm hoping that this will still count for something (should I wish to attend university in the future). I have no idea how they determine whether one is eligible or not but, given the record above I'm very doubtful. :unsure:

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You express yourself so extremely well, I hope you consider writing a novel while you await your government's decision....and, no, I'm not kidding! Please don't waste your writing talents! I used to teach writing at a private college, so I reocgnize excellent writing when I read it. You're very gifted...and I hope you explore all of the opportunities available to you.

You're still very young, and once you get a handle on your health issues, I imagine that your future will be bright. Thank you for sharing your dilemma with us, and I sincerely hope that you can get back on the right path.

Give your American mum a high-five for me!

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Actually, I was one of the less common types of students (as you probably read above) that actually did attend a residential college.

As far my university record went, I began in 2010 and passed most of my first semester courses (followed by me failing most of my second semester courses). In 2011, I passed all of my first semester courses but then failed all of my second semester courses (as I noticed my health deteriorating) and was placed on academic probation. In 2012, I failed all of my first semester courses (with marks like 13 out of 100) and (as you quoted above) was excluded from the University and would have to show cause if I wished to continue my studies in that particular program.

I also gather that, reading between the lines, the admin staff (including sub deans) at my residential college were keen to see me go.

I didn't wish to go down the "self-catered" accommodation route because we worried that buying groceries and cooking meals would hinder my ability to concentrate on my studies. My heart didn't seem to be in it like it should have been and so I decided to "pull the pin" (so to speak) and come home.

I did well in my senior studies at high school, so I'm hoping that this will still count for something (should I wish to attend university in the future). I have no idea how they determine whether one is eligible or not but, given the record above I'm very doubtful. :unsure:

Yes, I saw that you were in a residential college, that bit of my post was more for general info. I can understand why you'd want to be in one, but the time taken to prep meals isn't too much after you get used to it, perhaps you could practice while you're at home?

It sounds like you've already shown that you can achieve at university and you've just had some big struggles that were beyond your control. Seriously, for the reasons you were excluded they *do not* exclude you for life. It's not like you were thrown out for cheating. You can absolutely go back again when you're ready. You'll just have to do a more detailed application as they will no longer just look at your school records. In my second year I started dropping subjects until eventually I dropped the last two after the cut off and was asked to 'show cause' for my two failures for withdrawing after the cut off. I didn't and I was excluded. I reapplied a few years later (for another course) and was too lazy to do a supporting statement. I didn't get in. When I called the university to ask if that was why they said I would've been admitted if I'd done the statement. Lesson learned and the following year I applied again with a supporting statement explaining what had happened. I included a letter from my doctor (I dropped out because I was depressed, even though I wasn't being treated at the time).

Don't let anyone tell you that you won't be able to go back to university. Don't even tell yourself that. You absolutely can. If you want to stay home, then I highly recommend distance education. You have a supportive family. I was 25 by the time I finished; I'd been incredibly depressed and incredibly broke but I managed it and you can too :)

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ICM,

I've been following your thread...just wanted to stop in and say, I'm proud of you.

Also, have you given any thought to online colleges/universities?

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Thank you all for your support. A lot has happened since I last responded to this thread (including Government decisions, helping out with fixing up our recently bought house), and more.

You express yourself so extremely well, I hope you consider writing a novel while you await your government's decision....and, no, I'm not kidding! Please don't waste your writing talents! I used to teach writing at a private college, so I reocgnize excellent writing when I read it. You're very gifted...and I hope you explore all of the opportunities available to you.

You're still very young, and once you get a handle on your health issues, I imagine that your future will be bright. Thank you for sharing your dilemma with us, and I sincerely hope that you can get back on the right path.

Give your American mum a high-five for me!

My mum was right about my needing to go through disability services, as I actually did qualify for a disability allowance and have just attended my first appointment at the local Disability Employment Services centre. So while I might not redeem *all* that was spent on my studies and catered dorm life, it is definitely a start.

I will be looking into possibly getting some work experience in time. I will also be participating in some work skills sessions run by the DES centre within the next few weeks.

The suggestion about writing a book sounds great. I have a good collection of well over 15 DVDs that contain video recordings of me in my home program (1994-1997) that I just finished editing. They may become useful years from now. I was never a straight A student in English (I excelled in Information Technology and Music) - If I can recall (at this late time of night) my writing skills came from my Mum teaching me during my early home program.

Don't let anyone tell you that you won't be able to go back to university. Don't even tell yourself that. You absolutely can. If you want to stay home, then I highly recommend distance education. You have a supportive family. I was 25 by the time I finished; I'd been incredibly depressed and incredibly broke but I managed it and you can too :)

Thank you so much for sharing your story. I do not plan on returning to my studies at this time but will absolutely keep your suggestion on hand should I someday return to tertiary study.

I've been helping Dad with lots of housework at our new place and we've actually accomplished a lot! Far more within the last few months than probably in years had I stayed down at uni. So it's not all bad after all. :)

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It appears that you have a plan--that's great! Obviously, you possess a number of talents, and you'll have to learn through experience which ones to apply to make your future successful...and to be happy while you're at it.

Your home life sounds very peaceful right now, and I'm sure your parents love having you at home. So glad to hear about your ability to earn a disability income (yay!), which will help ease the adjustments to a new way of life for you. You're at a fork in the road, so to speak, and opportunities abound--good luck to you!

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Earlier today, I received an email from the University.

Dear icm,

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Errr... typically, standing is where you are at now. So basically what your gradepoint adverage for your classes. From my understanding, they reviewed your record up until you started to go down hill.

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Hi

I can't answer questions about uni in Australia, but I can say you will have an excellent chance of successfully returning to studies if and when it is right for you.

I used to be a university lecturer in a place that had about a third of the students 'mature'. I had the total pleasure of teaching many older students, many in their 20s and thirties, but also well beyond that. I think the oldest guy I saw graduate was 76. They came from all sorts of backgrounds, many had disabilities.

There is a level of maturity, determination and insight you can only gain through time and experience. You are clearly gaining that now.

I much prefered working with the older students, in fact I am almost in tears remembering how much I learned from THEM.

You are getting sorted and have fantastic opportunities ahead of you.

Very good luck.

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My 18 yo son who was dx'd with pdd-nos (at age 6) just started classes at the local college. He drives 2 dys a week & works 4 dys a week. So he is considered high functioning obviously but I did not feel he was ready to go to a residential college as his planning , handling ppl on the ph (bureaucracy) & daily living skills still need improvement. He also showed antibodies for celiac last yr so is gluten free.

What I want to ask you tho is this if you don't mind: You said your autism is cured. How do you know you are cured? As far as I know autism is not a curable thing. What were your issues that you no longer have? Is it that you now know how to cope/compensate that convinces you that you are cured? People with autism have a unique way of looking at things & have many talents (some unusual). Why would you even want to cure it as it makes you who YOU are? Certainly I am not speaking of the severely affected low functioning non verbal ppl, but generally for high functioning ppl I don't see anything that is wrong with having autism or that it needs a cure. From what you wrote I can tell you are very high functioning & are independent enough to attend university. Also since you were approved for disability services for autism the Australian gov't doesn't think autism can be cured (to your advantage in your situation) My son receives services from our state govt (FL) even tho he works & goes to school which cannot be said of many 'typical' teens these days. (my nephew is typical & just got outta jail! after 4 yrs!) I would rather have 10 sons with autism than 1 typical one. My son doesn't lie, steal, cheat, call ppl names, stab them in the back, do drugs, or break the law.

I do think you are amazing! I see nothing but good things for you. A few attributes of a person with autism is that they are honest, say what they think, & are not pretentious or flaky & can think out of the box. I am simply curious as to why you say you are cured.

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Errr... typically, standing is where you are at now. So basically what your gradepoint adverage for your classes. From my understanding, they reviewed your record up until you started to go down hill.

That's what I would have thought, too. But when they say 'in particular reference to Semester 1, 2012', I believe that my most recent (which are my worst) results will be taken to account.

Hi

I can't answer questions about uni in Australia, but I can say you will have an excellent chance of successfully returning to studies if and when it is right for you.

I used to be a university lecturer in a place that had about a third of the students 'mature'. I had the total pleasure of teaching many older students, many in their 20s and thirties, but also well beyond that. I think the oldest guy I saw graduate was 76. They came from all sorts of backgrounds, many had disabilities.

There is a level of maturity, determination and insight you can only gain through time and experience. You are clearly gaining that now.

I much prefered working with the older students, in fact I am almost in tears remembering how much I learned from THEM.

You are getting sorted and have fantastic opportunities ahead of you.

Very good luck.

I think you're right about the 'maturity' aspect as I definitely have/had some growing up to do... B)

My 18 yo son who was dx'd with pdd-nos (at age 6) just started classes at the local college. He drives 2 dys a week & works 4 dys a week. So he is considered high functioning obviously but I did not feel he was ready to go to a residential college as his planning , handling ppl on the ph (bureaucracy) & daily living skills still need improvement. He also showed antibodies for celiac last yr so is gluten free.

What I want to ask you tho is this if you don't mind: You said your autism is cured. How do you know you are cured? As far as I know autism is not a curable thing. What were your issues that you no longer have? Is it that you now know how to cope/compensate that convinces you that you are cured? People with autism have a unique way of looking at things & have many talents (some unusual). Why would you even want to cure it as it makes you who YOU are? Certainly I am not speaking of the severely affected low functioning non verbal ppl, but generally for high functioning ppl I don't see anything that is wrong with having autism or that it needs a cure. From what you wrote I can tell you are very high functioning & are independent enough to attend university. Also since you were approved for disability services for autism the Australian gov't doesn't think autism can be cured (to your advantage in your situation) My son receives services from our state govt (FL) even tho he works & goes to school which cannot be said of many 'typical' teens these days. (my nephew is typical & just got outta jail! after 4 yrs!) I would rather have 10 sons with autism than 1 typical one. My son doesn't lie, steal, cheat, call ppl names, stab them in the back, do drugs, or break the law.

I do think you are amazing! I see nothing but good things for you. A few attributes of a person with autism is that they are honest, say what they think, & are not pretentious or flaky & can think out of the box. I am simply curious as to why you say you are cured.

Thank you for your kind words, and sharing your son's experience. There may be a misunderstanding. I suspect you're referring to the following statement that I made in the original post:

I have mostly recovered through a long and tedious home program along with daily supplementation of Kirkman Super Nu Thera caplets

I never use the word "cured" as I know, without a doubt, that I still exhibit very obvious signs and symptoms of my problems from time to time. Some who are around me one-on-one (particularly music teachers and tutors I've had in the past) have complained countless times to my mum that I'm not functioning in a normal manner. "Switching off" is very characteristic of my problem.

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Thank you for your reply. Yeah I think you are right I read it as you are cured. My BAD!

Best of Luck to you!

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I still feel like complaining and publicising what happened. Where do you think I should start. I want to let go of it, but feel it needs to be made known to the public what they did since celiac is a valid condition and needs to be taken more seriously, especially by a top university in our country!

Let me know what you would do if you were to complain about something like this. Any tips on where to start would be appreciated. I saw some other interesting threads over at these links too.

I was thinking about putting a statement up at complaints.com or writing to the editor of the newspaper in the university region. What are your thoughts? :unsure:

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Hello there! I was in a very similar situation when I was working on my undergraduate degree. I wasn't diagnosed at the time but had a horrible year. I moved across the USA (from my parents' home in the West to attend school on the East Coast). I moved into an apartment dorm. I didn't have enough money for a meal plan and my parents refused to buy me one. I got a work study job and had exactly $5 a week for food. This means I ate a ton of pasta and cereal! I also had 3 roommates who would give me beer. Holy gluten, Batman! I fell apart by the end of the semester! I got very sick with pneumonia. The depression and anxiety was insane. The university medical center put me on Paxil. I was a total mess by the end of the semester! My grades were not good. Total mess!

I really cannot speak to your ASD. My niece and nephew have Asperger's and I doubt they will ever be "cured". But what I will give you is some hope regarding school. I had to take a year off from school. I ended up going a lower tier university once I got my health back on track. I ended up graduating Summa Cum Laude. I got into a pretty good graduate program! I earned my MA. Don't give up! You can turn it around. It takes a lot of work but it can be done. When applying to another university, I would absolutely discuss your issues with admissions. Explain what happened. When you get into another university, please talk with dining services or try to find an off campus roommate situation, if you can swing it. Some universities also have graduate student dorms, which are apartment-style. I would investigate if you could get into one of those so you are able to cook on your own.

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Hi there can I ask if u managed to get the pension ? I am also ASD and applied, went with a diagnosis of aspergers, depression, anxiety and bulimia... I've been waiting a long time to hear back..

Also I hope you are doing better. With everything .

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This topic is about eight months old. The original poster no longer participates here.

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    • Hey guys so question. I still am going through some of the motions to finally be diagnosed. I has a really bad case of acid reflux a few days ago and now i feel soo sick. Im still eating gluten because i got a negative biaopsy test but ive been told thag i more than likely still have it because its really hard to detect. Well i drank beer last night and had a poutine today stupid i know and now i feel soooo sick. And only felt really sick after the poutine. Now my question is can your symptoms get worse all of a sudden??  I have many other symptoms thaat read celiac deisease for most of my life. But since all doctors told me you have anxiety ibs and fibro at 28 years old. I just baiscally gave up and figured this was going to be my life feeling like crap for the rest of my life. Any thoughts??? Thanks guys. Sorry for the novel lol
    • A negative result from a biopsy that is. 
    • I have a question. Hey guys so question. I still am going through some of the motions to finally be diagnosed. I has a really bad case of acid reflux a few days ago and now i feel soo sick. Im still eating gluten because i got a negative test but ive been told thag i more than likely still have it because its really hard to detect. Well i drank beer last night and had a poutine today stupid i know and now i feel soooo sick. And only felt really sick after the poutine. Now my question is can your symptoms get worse all of a sudden??  I have many other symptoms thaat read celiac deisease for most of my life. But since all doctors told me you have anxiety ibs and fibro at 28 years old. I just baiscally gave up and figured this was going to be my life feeling like crap for the rest of my life. Any thoughts??? Thanks guys. Sorry for the novel lol
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