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Failed University


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22 replies to this topic

#16 Celiac Mindwarp

 
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Posted 13 September 2012 - 12:18 AM

Hi

I can't answer questions about uni in Australia, but I can say you will have an excellent chance of successfully returning to studies if and when it is right for you.

I used to be a university lecturer in a place that had about a third of the students 'mature'. I had the total pleasure of teaching many older students, many in their 20s and thirties, but also well beyond that. I think the oldest guy I saw graduate was 76. They came from all sorts of backgrounds, many had disabilities.

There is a level of maturity, determination and insight you can only gain through time and experience. You are clearly gaining that now.

I much prefered working with the older students, in fact I am almost in tears remembering how much I learned from THEM.

You are getting sorted and have fantastic opportunities ahead of you.

Very good luck.
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- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

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#17 maximoo

 
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Posted 15 September 2012 - 01:22 PM

My 18 yo son who was dx'd with pdd-nos (at age 6) just started classes at the local college. He drives 2 dys a week & works 4 dys a week. So he is considered high functioning obviously but I did not feel he was ready to go to a residential college as his planning , handling ppl on the ph (bureaucracy) & daily living skills still need improvement. He also showed antibodies for celiac last yr so is gluten free.

What I want to ask you tho is this if you don't mind: You said your autism is cured. How do you know you are cured? As far as I know autism is not a curable thing. What were your issues that you no longer have? Is it that you now know how to cope/compensate that convinces you that you are cured? People with autism have a unique way of looking at things & have many talents (some unusual). Why would you even want to cure it as it makes you who YOU are? Certainly I am not speaking of the severely affected low functioning non verbal ppl, but generally for high functioning ppl I don't see anything that is wrong with having autism or that it needs a cure. From what you wrote I can tell you are very high functioning & are independent enough to attend university. Also since you were approved for disability services for autism the Australian gov't doesn't think autism can be cured (to your advantage in your situation) My son receives services from our state govt (FL) even tho he works & goes to school which cannot be said of many 'typical' teens these days. (my nephew is typical & just got outta jail! after 4 yrs!) I would rather have 10 sons with autism than 1 typical one. My son doesn't lie, steal, cheat, call ppl names, stab them in the back, do drugs, or break the law.
I do think you are amazing! I see nothing but good things for you. A few attributes of a person with autism is that they are honest, say what they think, & are not pretentious or flaky & can think out of the box. I am simply curious as to why you say you are cured.
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#18 icm

 
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Posted 18 September 2012 - 03:37 PM

Errr... typically, standing is where you are at now. So basically what your gradepoint adverage for your classes. From my understanding, they reviewed your record up until you started to go down hill.


That's what I would have thought, too. But when they say 'in particular reference to Semester 1, 2012', I believe that my most recent (which are my worst) results will be taken to account.

Hi

I can't answer questions about uni in Australia, but I can say you will have an excellent chance of successfully returning to studies if and when it is right for you.

I used to be a university lecturer in a place that had about a third of the students 'mature'. I had the total pleasure of teaching many older students, many in their 20s and thirties, but also well beyond that. I think the oldest guy I saw graduate was 76. They came from all sorts of backgrounds, many had disabilities.

There is a level of maturity, determination and insight you can only gain through time and experience. You are clearly gaining that now.

I much prefered working with the older students, in fact I am almost in tears remembering how much I learned from THEM.

You are getting sorted and have fantastic opportunities ahead of you.

Very good luck.


I think you're right about the 'maturity' aspect as I definitely have/had some growing up to do... B)

My 18 yo son who was dx'd with pdd-nos (at age 6) just started classes at the local college. He drives 2 dys a week & works 4 dys a week. So he is considered high functioning obviously but I did not feel he was ready to go to a residential college as his planning , handling ppl on the ph (bureaucracy) & daily living skills still need improvement. He also showed antibodies for celiac last yr so is gluten free.

What I want to ask you tho is this if you don't mind: You said your autism is cured. How do you know you are cured? As far as I know autism is not a curable thing. What were your issues that you no longer have? Is it that you now know how to cope/compensate that convinces you that you are cured? People with autism have a unique way of looking at things & have many talents (some unusual). Why would you even want to cure it as it makes you who YOU are? Certainly I am not speaking of the severely affected low functioning non verbal ppl, but generally for high functioning ppl I don't see anything that is wrong with having autism or that it needs a cure. From what you wrote I can tell you are very high functioning & are independent enough to attend university. Also since you were approved for disability services for autism the Australian gov't doesn't think autism can be cured (to your advantage in your situation) My son receives services from our state govt (FL) even tho he works & goes to school which cannot be said of many 'typical' teens these days. (my nephew is typical & just got outta jail! after 4 yrs!) I would rather have 10 sons with autism than 1 typical one. My son doesn't lie, steal, cheat, call ppl names, stab them in the back, do drugs, or break the law.
I do think you are amazing! I see nothing but good things for you. A few attributes of a person with autism is that they are honest, say what they think, & are not pretentious or flaky & can think out of the box. I am simply curious as to why you say you are cured.


Thank you for your kind words, and sharing your son's experience. There may be a misunderstanding. I suspect you're referring to the following statement that I made in the original post:

I have mostly recovered through a long and tedious home program along with daily supplementation of Kirkman Super Nu Thera caplets


I never use the word "cured" as I know, without a doubt, that I still exhibit very obvious signs and symptoms of my problems from time to time. Some who are around me one-on-one (particularly music teachers and tutors I've had in the past) have complained countless times to my mum that I'm not functioning in a normal manner. "Switching off" is very characteristic of my problem.
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#19 maximoo

 
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Posted 18 September 2012 - 05:07 PM

Thank you for your reply. Yeah I think you are right I read it as you are cured. My BAD!
Best of Luck to you!
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#20 icm

 
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Posted 23 September 2012 - 05:31 PM

I still feel like complaining and publicising what happened. Where do you think I should start. I want to let go of it, but feel it needs to be made known to the public what they did since celiac is a valid condition and needs to be taken more seriously, especially by a top university in our country!

Let me know what you would do if you were to complain about something like this. Any tips on where to start would be appreciated. I saw some other interesting threads over at these links too.

http://www.celiac.co...-accommodating/
http://www.celiac.co...ing-in-college/

I was thinking about putting a statement up at complaints.com or writing to the editor of the newspaper in the university region. What are your thoughts? :unsure:
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#21 BitterGrad

 
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Posted 23 September 2012 - 06:19 PM

Hello there! I was in a very similar situation when I was working on my undergraduate degree. I wasn't diagnosed at the time but had a horrible year. I moved across the USA (from my parents' home in the West to attend school on the East Coast). I moved into an apartment dorm. I didn't have enough money for a meal plan and my parents refused to buy me one. I got a work study job and had exactly $5 a week for food. This means I ate a ton of pasta and cereal! I also had 3 roommates who would give me beer. Holy gluten, Batman! I fell apart by the end of the semester! I got very sick with pneumonia. The depression and anxiety was insane. The university medical center put me on Paxil. I was a total mess by the end of the semester! My grades were not good. Total mess!

I really cannot speak to your ASD. My niece and nephew have Asperger's and I doubt they will ever be "cured". But what I will give you is some hope regarding school. I had to take a year off from school. I ended up going a lower tier university once I got my health back on track. I ended up graduating Summa Cum Laude. I got into a pretty good graduate program! I earned my MA. Don't give up! You can turn it around. It takes a lot of work but it can be done. When applying to another university, I would absolutely discuss your issues with admissions. Explain what happened. When you get into another university, please talk with dining services or try to find an off campus roommate situation, if you can swing it. Some universities also have graduate student dorms, which are apartment-style. I would investigate if you could get into one of those so you are able to cook on your own.
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#22 jules81

 
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Posted 11 May 2013 - 02:54 AM

Hi there can I ask if u managed to get the pension ? I am also ASD and applied, went with a diagnosis of aspergers, depression, anxiety and bulimia... I've been waiting a long time to hear back..

Also I hope you are doing better. With everything .
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#23 psawyer

 
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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:49 AM

This topic is about eight months old. The original poster no longer participates here.


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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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