Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Sharing A Kitchen
0

5 posts in this topic

Sharing a kitchen with gluten eaters has been a big source of anxiety for me. I do it at home, and I'm quick to yell at my parents when they contaminate something. But I know that's not going to fly with my friends who I'll be living with this school year.

I know that I'm going to keep all of my cookware separate and foods labeled and separated as best as possible. Unfortunately we have limited kitchen space and I'm not quite sure how I'm going to pull this off.

Beyond that, how do I inform them, remind them, etc, without being a huge pain in the butt? With my parents, it's always, "Did you use a new utensil?" "Did you scoop instead of spread?" etc, and they roll their eyes at me.... I don't want to create this type of tension with my friends.

Anyone who shares a kitchen have tips? I'd so much rather be proactive than learn the hard way by getting glutened...or worse my friends being fed up with me!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I agree with you that it could strain relationships to be asking questions after every meal and educating endlessly. You want to be comfortable in your kitchen and you want them to be comfortable in theirs. But you have to be careful. I have thought that if I had to share a kitchen, like say, with my sister and her kids on vacation or something that my tactic would be to make it a little harder on them to use my stuff. For example, I think if you get in a habit of putting your things in ziplock bags it will be less convenient for them to use them. People grab other people's condiments and dishes and silverware out of convenience not to be mean or disrespect you. So what I would do is always wash your dishes after you eat and put them in Ziplock bags in the most inconvenient corner of the kitchen, say the bottom shelf of the furthest cupboard. Do the same thing with silverware and cooking utensils. Make it harder on yourself so you don't have to repeatedly discuss it with them. If you also ziplock each jar of condiments in the fridge it will be less convenient for them and it will also be obvious if they use your stuff because they won't be able to put if back like you left it. Maybe your pots and pans can be stored somewhere else. Anyway, people may mean well, but they aren't likely to take this as seriously as we have to. The hassle will be mostly on you if you do this. You will have to reach down to lowest cupboard in the back to get your utensils out of a ziplock to make a meal. But it will make it less likely for them to grab your stuff. Depends on how you want to handle it. I love my sister but I don't trust her. With kids to feed she will grab anything close by. So this is my strategy for sharing a kitchen. Of course you might be able to think of other ways to make it highly inconvenient for them to use your stuff and if you do...pass your ideas on to me. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

are you in a college dorm/apt? Celiac is covered under the disabilities act so you should have requested a private room with a fridge, that way there would be no way to get CC....or only have one room mate who gets it....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mawmaw- It's an off campus apartment so it's unaffiliated with the school.

eatmeat4good- I agree with you about making things inconvenient. I was brainstorming with my mom: we have a living room closet where I can keep my stuff tucked away in a bin. (We don't have a pantry in the kitchen, just cabinets.) My mom was annoyed, "WHY SHOULD YOU HAVE TO GO INTO THE LIVING ROOM TO GET YOUR STUFF?" ...she has a real issue with me being treated differently/losing convenience.

So now I'm looking into getting a pantry on wheels like this That way I can store my stuff out of sight and just wheel 'er in when I'm cooking.

Also, I don't plan on segregating my glass dishes and silverware since we have a dish washer.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a wonderful idea! The pantry on wheels! And...I have that little cart and it is amazing if you are looking for a reveiw. :)

I thought other posters here might agree with your mom...and I "get" the losing convenience factor is somewhat unfair. But it's a fair trade for me and well worth the peace of mind knowing that I am safe. You can try to teach your roommates and of course they should be educated about your disease, but in the end, it is you who gets sick and not them. So if keeping your stuff separate will help you, I say it's well worth it.

I was thinking though, that you do need separate condiments and not try to teach them the drop method and think that it is ok. If you think about how easy it is to stick your knife back in mayo because you need a little more, it is just the most difficult little habit to break.

I worked for a woman who agreed to keep her stuff gluten free and was interested in learning about gluten free and cross contamination and she learned the drop method to keep me safe. But she noted that each time she wanted a bit more mayo it meant getting another knife or spoon to dip it out. She said people would have to be really dedicated to you to want to do this for you. Haha! So I let her go back to using her condiments the way she was used to and I brought my own! In a situation with roommates I wouldn't expect them to remember to do this. Your mom-yes~ but roommates um no...just the way to be safer.

I love your idea of the pantry on wheels!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      102,707
    • Total Posts
      914,509
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • 3 months gluten-free still feeling cramps
      Glad to help!   Never stop advocating for your health.  Be patient (that's the really hard part), but it is possible to feel well and recover from celiac disease.  Of course, you'll always have to avoid gluten as if it were rat poisoning, but there are worst things to worry about!    It is nice to have a resource like Celiac.com.  It is anonymous, so you don't have to be embarrassed about asking what you may think are dumb questions.   Hang in there!  
    • Ghirardelli Chocolate Chips
      Well, that is just wheat. Their bars/squares might be wheat free, as well, but the culprit there is barley.    Also I just got this reply: For legal reasons the information that has been provided is the only information we are authorized to provide you with.  To reiterate, our products are not certified as being gluten free. FDA requires products to be tested to confirm that gluten level is below 20ppm. Currently, Ghirardelli products have not been tested to this requirement and therefore, we do not make any gluten free claims for our products. Sincerely,  Ghirardelli Consumer Services
    • Ghirardelli Chocolate Chips
      They seem to be good about saying things may contain wheat when their products are made on shared equipment, for example their ground chocolate which I no longer use.   This is the reply I got a year ago (March 2015) when asking about their 60% cacao chips. "Dear Consumer, There is no wheat in our 60% chips and no wheat in our chips facility, as such, no wheat is run on the same line as any of our chips. Sincerely, Consumer Affairs Response Team"  
    • 3 months gluten-free still feeling cramps
      Thank you so much for the info, I did replace all my cooking wares and I did just recently stop dairy (about 3 weeks ago). I guess I have to keep it going, thank you once again, this give me more courage to continue my quest in feeling better.
    • Ghirardelli Chocolate Chips
      Hey guys,  I emailed Ghirardelli to ask about their updated allergen information because I had heard that people stopped recommending most of their products. I was specifically asking about their chocolate chips because my understanding is that they are free of gluten and not made on the same lines as that one bar/square that contains barley. This is what I received back:
      "Thank you for contacting Ghirardelli Chocolate Company.  We appreciate your interest in finding out about the ingredients in our products and your interest in a gluten free product.

      At this time we do not offer any "gluten free" products, but appreciate your interest in seeing whether Ghirardelli offers one.  Our products are not certified as being gluten free. FDA requires products to be tested to confirm that gluten level is below 20ppm. Currently, Ghirardelli products have not been tested to this requirement and therefore, we do not make any gluten free claims for our products. Please reference the ingredient information, on our packaging for any Ghirardelli product that you are interested in, to determine if it is suitable for you.

      Please know you are a valued consumer and we do appreciate your interest in our products.

      Sincerely,

      Consumer Affairs Response Team"   I asked them to please clarify - are your products testing over 20ppm? Or you don't test them at all? I also asked about the lines that the chocolate chips are made on because the ingredients do not indicated any problems. The customer service rep sent me the exact same message back with one of the lines underlined. I emailed again, and they don't seem to want to disclose any more information.   Has anyone else had any luck talking with them lately? Insights on the chocolate chips?
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      59,749
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    rockymountainhigh
    Joined