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Cross Contamination Question?
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I'm severely allergic to wheat and milk. I accidentally consumed a granola bar with oats and milk in it and I had to be taken to the ER cause of anaphylactic shock. This just happened.

I don't know what to do about cc. If a product doesn't have wheat or milk listed in its ingredients, but says "produced in a facility where wheat and milk products are also prepared" can i still eat it?

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I wouldn't take the chance if I were you. For most of us, CC gives us a few days of misery. But because you get anaphylactic reactions, the next CC incident might just kill you. My Dad had asthma, and one night even the epipen didn't work. He died. PLEASE, don't take any chances!!

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That warning is there in part so people with anaphylactic reactions will be made aware and will know NOT to eat it. There is no way it is worth the risk of dying. Do not eat anything with that label. I believe it is voluntary for them to put Made in a facility that also processes wheat, so just because it isn't on the package does not mean that it was not processed in a facility that processes wheat.

I think your reaction is as severe as it can get, so you might want to consider just eating Certified Gluten Free Products, and stay away from everything else.

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That warning is there in part so people with anaphylactic reactions will be made aware and will know NOT to eat it. There is no way it is worth the risk of dying. Do not eat anything with that label. I believe it is voluntary for them to put Made in a facility that also processes wheat, so just because it isn't on the package does not mean that it was not processed in a facility that processes wheat.

I think your reaction is as severe as it can get, so you might want to consider just eating Certified Gluten Free Products, and stay away from everything else.

Grrr ok thanks. If its to keep me alive, I'll do it

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Oh and does anyone have a list of dedicated gluten free facilities?

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Oh and does anyone have a list of dedicated gluten free facilities?

Of course, in your case, they would also need to be dairy-free.

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Oh and does anyone have a list of dedicated gluten free facilities?

Try this website: http://www.gfco.org/

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I read an article a few years back on the chances we take when we see certain warnings on a supposedly gluten-free product. The article stated that tests have shown that 70% of the products processed on equipment on which wheat products are also processed turn out to be cross-contaminated with gluten, and 30% of the products processed in a facility that also processes wheat products are cross-contaminated with gluten. In other words, you'd be taking a huge chance by eating any such products.

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And Sage, b/c you have anaphylactic reactions this needs to be talked about. You are 14 & at that age where soon you will think about kissing & I don't mean kissing on the cheek right? You need to know that is not okay. That person is going to need to brush their teeth WELL & maybe even use mouthwash. This is to save your life dear. Anyone who is not willing to do that for you is not worthy of YOU.

My hubs nephew has anaphylactic reactions to --- everything --- wheat, dairy, eggs, nuts, bee stings, wasp stings ---- I think he lives on soy & I know that if someone has eggs for breakfast & then kisses him on the cheek his cheek breaks out big time. They have to brush their teeth & wash their face (food gets all around your mouth area) before they can safely kiss him on the cheek.

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I read an article a few years back on the chances we take when we see certain warnings on a supposedly gluten-free product. The article stated that tests have shown that 70% of the products processed on equipment on which wheat products are also processed turn out to be cross-contaminated with gluten, and 30% of the products processed in a facility that also processes wheat products are cross-contaminated with gluten. In other words, you'd be taking a huge chance by eating any such products

Wow That's crazy!!! Didn't know that so thanks so so much for telling me. I'm scared now :( does anyone else here have severe allergies besides gluten/wheat?? How do you cope??

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Wow That's crazy!!! Didn't know that so thanks so so much for telling me. I'm scared now :( does anyone else here have severe allergies besides gluten/wheat?? How do you cope??

Sage, start a new thread on that subject. You're likely to get much better responses as those who have these kind of reactions are more apt to see it.

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Wow That's crazy!!! Didn't know that so thanks so so much for telling me. I'm scared now :( does anyone else here have severe allergies besides gluten/wheat?? How do you cope??

First, take a deep breath. You can do this. :-)

You don't have to be terrified, but a little fear is normal. Who wouldn't be afraid when they have something like this come into their lives? It's scary to think that just getting something in your mouth can be that dangerous.

What you don't have to do is let it cripple you. It's there, yes. But...so is the danger of being hit by a car, or getting food poisoning, or falling off a cliff. We take precautions to avoid those risks, right? Like look both ways before you cross the street, keep food in the fridge, don't get too close to the edge of the cliff. That's all you have to do now: learn what precautions you need to take for THIS new risk in your life, and do that. The more you learn about what precautions you need to take, the better chance you have of being healthy and happy.

The main change you make when you develop a reaction that can kill is that you have to be much more aware of your actions and the world around you now. It feels scarier at first, when you're not used to it, but - well, pardon yet another analogy - I kind of think of living with an allergy like learning to walk on the balance beam.

First time, you might be scared you'll fall off. But after a while you get used to it, get better at paying attention to your balance, and you can do it smoothly and you stop being afraid you're going to fall. But you'll never be able to do it without a part of you concentrating, because you will never be able to get off this balance beam. The risk of falling will always be there.

Second change you'll need to make, now that you've done some breathing ;-), is start thinking differently about how you interact with the world.

There is a habit you will need to consciously develop now: nothing touches the mouth. You don't touch your mouth with your hand, or chew on your nail, or lick your finger if you prick it on something or bite a pen or pencil, none of that, unless the item in question has been washed with soap that you know it is safe.

And you also don't touch your mouth to anything else, like kissing someone's cheek or their hair, unless they have washed it with something safe for you. They can have hair products, lotions, after shave, all sorts of things that you'll need to be aware of.

It is hard to do this, because we normally touch our face and mouth constantly, even when we're not aware that we're doing it. But it's possible. It'll just take work. My daughter was a couple years younger than you when she started having issues and after numerous reactions, she decided to wear cotton gloves for a couple months - the feeling of the cotton on her face would remind her what she was doing so that she was more aware of it until she didn't do it anymore.

I have a reaction to an inhaled substance, too, so when we went out I wore a mask like a dental hygienist, which helped me become more aware of attempts to touch my mouth/face.

You may want to talk to your folks and see about getting wheat and dairy free lotion, soap, shampoo and so on for the family. For yourself, at the very least. Even if you are not eating your conditioner, say, it's nice to know that your own hair is not posing a risk to your life if you accidentally get it in your mouth.

I'm sorry you have to cope with this; always better when we don't have to. But you can do this. Take support from your family, ask for help researching where wheat and dairy may be in your food and other supplies, and you can totally do this. :-)

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First, take a deep breath. You can do this. :-)

You don't have to be terrified, but a little fear is normal. Who wouldn't be afraid when they have something like this come into their lives? It's scary to think that just getting something in your mouth can be that dangerous.

What you don't have to do is let it cripple you. It's there, yes. But...so is the danger of being hit by a car, or getting food poisoning, or falling off a cliff. We take precautions to avoid those risks, right? Like look both ways before you cross the street, keep food in the fridge, don't get too close to the edge of the cliff. That's all you have to do now: learn what precautions you need to take for THIS new risk in your life, and do that. The more you learn about what precautions you need to take, the better chance you have of being healthy and happy.

The main change you make when you develop a reaction that can kill is that you have to be much more aware of your actions and the world around you now. It feels scarier at first, when you're not used to it, but - well, pardon yet another analogy - I kind of think of living with an allergy like learning to walk on the balance beam.

First time, you might be scared you'll fall off. But after a while you get used to it, get better at paying attention to your balance, and you can do it smoothly and you stop being afraid you're going to fall. But you'll never be able to do it without a part of you concentrating, because you will never be able to get off this balance beam. The risk of falling will always be there.

Second change you'll need to make, now that you've done some breathing ;-), is start thinking differently about how you interact with the world.

There is a habit you will need to consciously develop now: nothing touches the mouth. You don't touch your mouth with your hand, or chew on your nail, or lick your finger if you prick it on something or bite a pen or pencil, none of that, unless the item in question has been washed with soap that you know it is safe.

And you also don't touch your mouth to anything else, like kissing someone's cheek or their hair, unless they have washed it with something safe for you. They can have hair products, lotions, after shave, all sorts of things that you'll need to be aware of.

It is hard to do this, because we normally touch our face and mouth constantly, even when we're not aware that we're doing it. But it's possible. It'll just take work. My daughter was a couple years younger than you when she started having issues and after numerous reactions, she decided to wear cotton gloves for a couple months - the feeling of the cotton on her face would remind her what she was doing so that she was more aware of it until she didn't do it anymore.

I have a reaction to an inhaled substance, too, so when we went out I wore a mask like a dental hygienist, which helped me become more aware of attempts to touch my mouth/face.

You may want to talk to your folks and see about getting wheat and dairy free lotion, soap, shampoo and so on for the family. For yourself, at the very least. Even if you are not eating your conditioner, say, it's nice to know that your own hair is not posing a risk to your life if you accidentally get it in your mouth.

I'm sorry you have to cope with this; always better when we don't have to. But you can do this. Take support from your family, ask for help researching where wheat and dairy may be in your food and other supplies, and you can totally do this. :-)

Thanks :)

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