Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Does A Gluten Free Diet Actually Cure Celiacs Disease?
0

18 posts in this topic

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Jerick and I was diagnosed with celiacs disease when I was 16yrs old ( I am currently 22 - Also I haven't seen a digestive dr, or gastrologist in 5 years for follow up for my celiac condition. However I have decided to take control of my health and have scheduled an appointment at a local digestive disease dr in the area).

I haven't been dedicated to my diet and therefore my health has taken a poor turn. I've gained and lost a great deal of weight, I suffer from depression and constipation. In the past I have followed my dietary restrictions by not eating wheat but I haven't been as careful with cross-contamination and hidden gluten ingredients.

I have decided to research my disease and see what steps are necessary for hopefully curing my intestine and living a long life. However since I've taken the time to study up on my condition I have been met with nothing but uncertainty and fear. My question today has to do with an article from chicago medical center for celiacs disease found here. I am particularly upset by the following statement; " While healing may take up to 2 years for many older adults, new research shows that the small intestines of up to 60% of adults never completely heal, especially when adherence to the diet is less than optimal."

From what I understand and have read from various sources celiac's can heal by adhering to a gluten free lifestyle. However studies still show that 60% of people never completely heal therefore the leaky gut condition, and inflammation is still prevalent leading to early death and other autoimmune disorders. So does this mean that the gluten free diet isn't working? Is there anything else that could be done to cure my condition?

The Select Carbohydrate diet states that our bodies are unable to due to the ingredients found in "gluten free foods" based on Corn, Rice, and Tapioca. The listed ingredients are harder for the body to break down therefore causing bacteria to grow which causes the intestines to inflame, leading to negative consequences in Celiacs.

I am writing to everyone today in hopes there is anyone or group of individuals that could help clarify and lend some advice as to how I should approach a gluten free diet. I feel so pulled and frustrated I would just like some peace of mind.

I am willing to adhere to the SCD lifestyle diet however I do not have the funds to purchase all the food processors and blenders necessary.

Thank you for your time!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

First - you hardly qualify as an "older adult". :D

Second - It does say when adherence to the diet is not followed

Go to the GI. Maybe get another endoscopy to see where you are. Follow a strict gluten-free diet. That is the only "cure". You could get a repeat endoscopy in 2 years and see if you healed.

The other thing is that you really aren't cured. You will still have Celiac, even if your intestines have healed. You cannot go back to eating gluten after healed. You will just get a damaged intestine again.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Karen regarding seeing a GI doctor right away and getting serious about your gluten-free diet.

You should understand that Celiac, which is an autoimmune disease, means there is no "cure" (you will always have celiac disease), but there is a treatment (the strict gluten-free diet) which will put the symptoms into remission.

You feel lousy because you are not following the diet, hon --and risking serious complications.

You do not necessarily need to follow the SCD diet to adhere to a safe gluten-free diet.

Just follow a gluten-free diet, which includes NO RYE, BARLEY or any wheat derivatives. Oats MUST BE certified gluten-free. I notice you said you just avoid wheat.

You need some guidance from a GI doctor, some follow up blood work and a better understanding of what a true gluten-free diet is.

You are in the right place!

I suggest you learn about cross contamination and hidden sources of gluten so you can see what steps you need to take.

All this information is in this thread:

I hope this will help you get started. Best wishes!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Jerick and I was diagnosed with celiacs disease when I was 16yrs old ( I am currently 22 - Also I haven't seen a digestive dr, or gastrologist in 5 years for follow up for my celiac condition. However I have decided to take control of my health and have scheduled an appointment at a local digestive disease dr in the area).

I haven't been dedicated to my diet and therefore my health has taken a poor turn. I've gained and lost a great deal of weight, I suffer from depression and constipation. In the past I have followed my dietary restrictions by not eating wheat but I haven't been as careful with cross-contamination and hidden gluten ingredients.

I have decided to research my disease and see what steps are necessary for hopefully curing my intestine and living a long life. However since I've taken the time to study up on my condition I have been met with nothing but uncertainty and fear. My question today has to do with an article from chicago medical center for celiacs disease found here. I am particularly upset by the following statement; " While healing may take up to 2 years for many older adults, new research shows that the small intestines of up to 60% of adults never completely heal, especially when adherence to the diet is less than optimal."

From what I understand and have read from various sources celiac's can heal by adhering to a gluten free lifestyle. However studies still show that 60% of people never completely heal therefore the leaky gut condition, and inflammation is still prevalent leading to early death and other autoimmune disorders. So does this mean that the gluten free diet isn't working? Is there anything else that could be done to cure my condition?

The Select Carbohydrate diet states that our bodies are unable to due to the ingredients found in "gluten free foods" based on Corn, Rice, and Tapioca. The listed ingredients are harder for the body to break down therefore causing bacteria to grow which causes the intestines to inflame, leading to negative consequences in Celiacs.

I am writing to everyone today in hopes there is anyone or group of individuals that could help clarify and lend some advice as to how I should approach a gluten free diet. I feel so pulled and frustrated I would just like some peace of mind.

I am willing to adhere to the SCD lifestyle diet however I do not have the funds to purchase all the food processors and blenders necessary.

Thank you for your time!

In my opinion, there are too many factors for one to say "just eat a 100% gluten free diet and you will be fine". New studies have shown that corn gluten is absolutely unsafe for gluten sensitive people. Two years ago, i went "gluten-free". Fast forward to the present, i still have many food intolerances, most likely linked to having a leaky gut. And along with my leaky gut, i have an overgrowth of candida. I've been where you are at, looking to this forum for a simple answer. But here lately i've realized there is no simple answer because everyone's situation is different. I've noticed a lot of people with celiac disease will not accept that the studies on this disease are still evolving, and they continue to eat nothing but processed "gluten-free" foods on a daily basis. Ignorance is bliss, and i especially can vouch for that. I lived it.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The corn question is far from absolute. I have been diagnosed for 12 years, and have been eating corn for all that time. I have been retested via biopsy, and found to have normal, undamaged villi. If corn is the same as other gluten, how did I possibly heal? Why am I still very healthy, and symptom-free, after 12 years of eating gluten-free, but consuming corn and rice?

Some people with celiac disease are also intolerant to corn (and other foods), but I seem to prove that this is not universal.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




First of all, neither Karen nor I suggested "nothing but processed gluten free foods on a daily basis".

In fact, I often suggest a whole foods diet to people, until they learn what they can and cannot tolerate.

Your leaky gut, candida overgrowth and other food intolerances are not necessarily what the OP is dealing with.

And not every celiac has issues with corn.

Corn gluten is not harmful to celiacs ---as far as we know.

You are correct in that we do not know all there is to know about this disease process and recovery, but the majority of celiacs do just fine still consuming grains.

This young man has not even followed a true gluten free diet yet, so he has not even begun to heal.

A visit to the GI doctor will reveal what is happening in his gut. He can have a test for SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth) after he finds out if his gut if even healing.

Let's not get him worried about candida or other food intolerances until he knows where he stands.

He's already pretty worried right now.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, neither Karen nor I suggested "nothing but processed gluten free foods on a daily basis".

I did not mention Karen or you at all.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The corn question is far from absolute. I have been diagnosed for 12 years, and have been eating corn for all that time. I have been retested via biopsy, and found to have normal, undamaged villi. If corn is the same as other gluten, how did I possibly heal? Why am I still very healthy, and symptom-free, after 12 years of eating gluten-free, but consuming corn and rice?

Some people with celiac disease are also intolerant to corn (and other foods), but I seem to prove that this is not universal.

I stand corrected. Thank you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your input and advise. I will wait for further diagnosis. I've decided to go ahead and just stick to a gluten free/SCD. I just hope I haven't caused too much damage. I am pretty ashamed of my lack of knowledge and general care for my health. I have begun to taking L-glutamine for villi health, probiotics as an anti-inflammatory, and a daily vitamin supplement to cover the rest of my bases

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome!

No need to be so hard on yourself - you have acknowledged the need to learn about Celiac Disease and are now dedicated to living gluten-free. While this disease can make anyone feel much older than they are, you are still a very young adult. To me, it sounds like you are set to succeed, heal and start feeling young again.

Happy healing to you :)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not mention Karen or you at all.

Nope, you didn't--you were very general, but since we both had just said "follow a strict gluten free diet" because he admitted he hadn't been--I just wanted it to be clear.

It's all good. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your input and advise. I will wait for further diagnosis. I've decided to go ahead and just stick to a gluten free/SCD. I just hope I haven't caused too much damage. I am pretty ashamed of my lack of knowledge and general care for my health. I have begun to taking L-glutamine for villi health, probiotics as an anti-inflammatory, and a daily vitamin supplement to cover the rest of my bases

You're doing all you can, hon! Get yourself a celiac-savvy GI to help you with proper care. Sounds like you're on the right path.

Best wishes, welcome to the forum and I hope you start to feel better soon!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While this disease can make anyone feel much older than they are,

true, true.

oh man, sometimes I have felt 103..... and other days, my perky self of 22 (in my head anyway....) :lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Richterface,

Well neat, I have a neighbor named Richter. He is in the Coat Guard though and older.

It's good you are taking the gluten-free diet and celiac disease seriously now. The damage builds up over time and can suddenly become much worse also. Sometimes people develop other autoimmune disease if they go untreated. But you can avoid all that by sticking to the gluten-free diet. Can you cook your own food? That is a big help in avoiding gluten. Eating out in restraunts is risky. Cooking your own whole foods is a big help in avoiding gluten. It doesn't have to be fancy food, simple whole foods are safer and are good tasting too. I added a bunch of links below that may help you get started.

@BridgeofSighs,

HI,

Corn is definitely a problem for some of us. The whole leaky gut thing does tend to cause various food intolerances in people. There is quite a range of food intolerances among the forum posters. Nightshades, corn, eggs, sals, soy, oats, grapes, carrots and some others too. Basically we can become intolerant to any food. corn doesn't bother me except for corn on the cob, but ground or flour is fine. BuI I have plenty of other intolerances to make up for corn. :) I hope you are feeling better and doing well with your diet. This is all a learning process for us.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

FAQ Celiac com

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101

What's For Breakfast Today?

What Did You Have For Lunch Today?

What Are You Cooking Tonight?

Dessert thread

Easy yummy bread in minutes

How bad is cheating?

Short temper thread

Non celiac wheat sensitivity article

http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ajg2012236a.html

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey! Let's not overwhelm the poor guy (?) with all the foods that he could, maybe, find a problem with. Let's get him started being gluten-free for a few months,first! Then, if he is still having problems, go for it! :)

cm

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

true, true.

oh man, sometimes I have felt 103..... and other days, my perky self of 22 (in my head anyway....) :lol:

Amazing the difference - I've felt over 90 more often then my real age throughout my 30s and 40s - but felt better than I did at 18 for eight whole months last year....gotta get that magic back - never knew how sick I'd been my entire life before I had that window of health - 'tis amazing what a body can tolerate before causing a real fuss ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The corn question is far from absolute. I have been diagnosed for 12 years, and have been eating corn for all that time. I have been retested via biopsy, and found to have normal, undamaged villi. If corn is the same as other gluten, how did I possibly heal? Why am I still very healthy, and symptom-free, after 12 years of eating gluten-free, but consuming corn and rice?

Some people with celiac disease are also intolerant to corn (and other foods), but I seem to prove that this is not universal.

You should take note that being intolerant of corn or rice is different to gluten intolerance, celiac disease. You seem to be on the right track.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should take note that being intolerant of corn or rice is different to gluten intolerance, celiac disease. You seem to be on the right track.

I think he was 'taking note" of that

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,689
    • Total Posts
      921,759
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes like a protein powder. I visit a local store there is so many brands and on every brand have write gluten free.that's way I confused which one is best any suggestions ! 
    • Do you mean something like a protein powder you could mix up?  A lot of them in the US seem to be gluten free.  Maybe just go to your local store and read all the labels?
    • Yeah I ended up allergic to corn, olives, sesame, whey, and peanuts and intolerant to dairy, soy, yeast, enzyme issues with breaking down meats, and egg yolks, along with extreme bloat with any kind of carbs/sugars in moderate amounts. And very adverse reactions to certain artificial sweeteners. So your not alone in all the other issues cropping up, it happens as our bodies adjust.  I eat a bunch of stir frys with veggies, egg whites, plenty of  avocados, and toasted and raw forms of almonds, coconut, cashews, walnuts, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds, sancha inchi seeds, chia seeds, and sunflower seeds in all forms including making them into butters, spreads, and incorporating them into sauces.   Most meals are forms of soups, omelettes, and stir frys. I do the seeds and nuts on rotation same with my veggies and snack on fruits in small amounts along with some homemade baked goods I make for markets. I do suggest a rotation of foods, my dietician said I need to rotate my foods to prevent more issues, making sure I am off one one for at least 7-14 days at a time completely. I find changing up the spices and rotating my cuisine base works well. I also make puddings, and protein shakes along with nut/seed milks, and different bases and extract flavorings to get my random cravings Taken care of. Guess take what you can from this and and see how it can help you,    As to the tinging, I ended up with both B vitamin and magnesium deficiency issues, the magnesium one caused a fire like tingling in my arms, legs and back, along with muscle pain. Ended up on a doctors best powder form of it so I can dose it out right, and found epsom salt bathes helped.  
    • GLUTEN-FREE CERTIFICATION · FOOD SERVICES ... Celiac disease is an inherited condition, meaning that genetics do play a role. The chances ... View the full article
    • Hi, I've gained so much knowledge on this forum over the past few months, which I am so thankful for. I can see how much hell people are going through with this disease and it's so lovely to see how much support and advice people give to others on here. I'd like a little bit of reassurance and advice myself from anyone that can help. I've been gluten free for six months. Two weeks after going gluten free I realised I also had a problem with corn so cut out processed food. Over the following weeks and months I continually had problems with food; fruit, dairy, a lot of vegetables, nuts, soya....it's basically dwindled down to just eating potatoes (not white potatoes), cucumber, lettuce, small amounts of red onion, spring onion, sprouts and beetroot. There may be more things I could be okay with but to be honest I'm too scared to try.  Is this all normal? Am I an extreme case? I've been taking some digestive enzymes and probiotics for about six weeks, my acid reflux has dramatically decreased but I always have a lot of loud noises going on in my guts, I'm guessing this is the probiotics working.  I've lost nearly 3st in weight since this started - which I'm not complaining about as I was overweight due to thyroid problems. I've had loads of blood tests done recently, all organs are working 'great' according to my doctor, the only thing they've picked up on is ketones, I seem to be having a glucose problem, which might explain my exhaustion and weight loss. I also have permanent numbness and sometimes tingling in one of my legs and sometimes hands and one shoulder, I thought it could have vitamin B12 deficiency but that's okay according to blood tests. I would be greatful for any replies. Thanks for reading.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,692
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    EllianaEthan
    Joined