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Oops, Read The Label Even On Liquid Stevia


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#1 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 08:33 AM

I have been using flavored liquid stevia on occassion. I was having company and thought perhaps that I would use up some I don't eat anymore that has vanilla. I poured in the 1/2 tsp. Just after I did so I realized that in the 4 or so months since going gluten free I had never read the label. But it was after all just stevia, but stevia is a leaf and this is a liquid. There must be something else in it. I read it. Discovery time: There were natural flavorings in it. = wheat.

I checked the clear stevia which I have been using for my shakes and buckwheat cereal. Gasp the same. Then my husband discovered another brand in the refrigerater. Once again "natural flavorings".

If someone knows of stevia that does not include natural flavorings let me know. I do like the liquids best. It never seems to give me the bitter flavor.

Always read the label.

Diana
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#2 kareng

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 08:38 AM

Natural flavorings does not mean wheat. In the US, they must declare wheat if that is an ingredient.
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#3 bartfull

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 09:11 AM

"Natural flavoring" is USUALLY carried on corn. That's why Stevia is no good for folks with corn intolerance.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#4 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:28 AM

Corn is a not for me (and many) too. I will check up on natural flavoring, because I was told it has gluten. Oh, I guess that is the difference. For me I am not to have any grain. I know corn has gluten, because we have used corn gluten to keep the weeds down in the garden.

Bartful, please explain "Carried on Corn."

Please also explain. that Stevia is not good for Celiacs. I can grow stevia plant out in my garden, grind it, and consume it. Were you, by chance thinking of xylitol?

Diana
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#5 bartfull

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:49 AM

OK, picture pure "flavoring". It doesn't take much. In order to put it into a food you must have enough of it to "spread around" evenly in that food. If you just put a drop into each item it will be concentrated in the area you dropped it in and won't be evenly distributed. So they usually put it in corn starch and those now flavored grains of corn starch CAN be evenly mixed into whatever food they are flavoring.

Xylitol is a no-no for corn intolerant people too, but because Stevia does have "natural flavoring", and because natural flavoring usually IS carried on corn, most corn intolerant folks avoid it.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#6 kareng

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:58 AM

I know corn has gluten, because we have used corn gluten to keep the weeds down in the garden.




All grains have "gluten". Celiacs misuse that term when we are only referring to wheat, rye & barley. Corn gluten, rice gluten, etc are all safe for someone with Celiac. It is possible to have an issue with another food like corn or even bananas, that doesn't not mean they have the gluten that causes a Celiac reaction.

Please read the safe and unsafe food lists on this site. That might help you understand what has gluten and what doesn't.

http://www.celiac.co...-&-Ingredients/
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#7 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:14 PM

I have used PURE stevia in baking. I am a celiac who gets sick rapidly and for weeks if gluten is involved in any way.

"natural flavoring" does NOT necessarily mean wheat, corn, soy.

Pure Stevia--does not contain gluten.

Pure Stevia---is not made from corn.


It is an herb.

http://www.stevia.co...stions_FAQ/2269
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#8 bartfull

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:33 PM

SOME Stevia does have corn in it. The stuff in packets at coffee shops has corn to keep it from clumping. And SOME stevia has corn from ethanol which is used in extracting it from the leaf.

From Wiki: Rebaudioside A has the least bitterness of all the steviol glycosides in the stevia plant. To produce rebaudioside A commercially, stevia plants are dried and subjected to a water extraction process. This crude extract contains about 50% rebaudioside A; its various glycoside molecules are separated via crystallization techniques, typically using ethanol or methanol as solvent. This allows the manufacturer to isolate pure rebaudioside A

Granted, it won't bother most people, but those who are sensitive to corn really should avoid it unless like Diana, they grow their own.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#9 Takala

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:37 PM

Some, no, a lot of the stevia brands I have seen for sale are carrying a "gluten free" label somewhere. I think some of the manufacturers are aware of the coincidence that the sugar avoiding people can also be the gluten avoiding people. You can go to their websites or contact them, and see what the carrier liquid or powdered fiber is made out of. (if I was trying to avoid corn, I'd think I'd just tear my hair out at this point :rolleyes: ) I've seen plain stevia in the health food stores, also, in the form of this powder you are supposed to serve in itty bitty measures.

Since I am the person who keeps pointing out that there is a labeling loophole with these natural flavorings labels, USDA vs. FDA, just be aware that you still can have gluten free AND natural flavorings in the same item, if the manufacturer is on the up and up. We who are more sensitive to mystery ingredients just have to be more careful and do a bit more research on some items.

An example of natural flavorings labels gone awry lately, was with those Starbucks strawberry- flavored fancy drinks not really being vegan, because they used cochineal, which is red dye made from insects, which upset some people, so they are phasing it out. Of course, cochineal is also used in a lot of cosmetics, and to some people, this matters, and they prefer to use vegan cosmetics, others probably don't really want to know what is in that blush. I just don't want my lipstick or balm to have gluten. :P
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#10 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:21 AM

OK, picture pure "flavoring". It doesn't take much. In order to put it into a food you must have enough of it to "spread around" evenly in that food. If you just put a drop into each item it will be concentrated in the area you dropped it in and won't be evenly distributed. So they usually put it in corn starch and those now flavored grains of corn starch CAN be evenly mixed into whatever food they are flavoring.

Xylitol is a no-no for corn intolerant people too, but because Stevia does have "natural flavoring", and because natural flavoring usually IS carried on corn, most corn intolerant folks avoid it.


Thank you.
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#11 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:26 AM

I only "Cook from scratch". I always thought that Salt, and other simple items would only have what is in the bold print. Hopefully, I woke up to this now.

Karen, I will have a look, or print of the lists of watch out fors.

DIana
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#12 BethM55

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 12:55 PM

I use packets of "Stevia in the Raw", a powdered stevia. It contains dextrose and stevia leaf extract. Each little packet states "Naturally Gluten Free Food". This product also comes in bulk form, which I think is also gluten free, although I have not used it nor looked at the package in awhile. I believe instead of dextrose it contains maltodextrin, which is also gluten free.
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Self diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten free since 12/09.
Diagnosed with fibromyalgia about 15 years ago. Fibro symptoms have improved but not gone away with gluten free living.
Osteoarthritis, mostly in hands and neck and lumbar spine. Not sure if going gluten-free has helped that problem, but it certainly can't hurt. (Am very grateful that so far no sign of the RA that is devastating my mother lately.)
Considering a dairy free trial. Considering.

#13 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 24 October 2012 - 04:26 AM

I use packets of "Stevia in the Raw", a powdered stevia. It contains dextrose and stevia leaf extract. Each little packet states "Naturally Gluten Free Food". This product also comes in bulk form, which I think is also gluten free, although I have not used it nor looked at the package in awhile. I believe instead of dextrose it contains maltodextrin, which is also gluten free.


Thanks,

I have purchased the green form of stevia. Perhaps next year I can plant it in the garden. I have made other attempts at that. Anyway, since I purchased the green form I very rarely use it. Maybe I can do without?
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#14 shadowicewolf

 
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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:01 AM

starbucks is now using tomato extract for the coloring... <_<
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