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Spouse May Have Celiac
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My significant other has been gluten sensitive most of his life to varying degrees. Somedays he can eat an entire pizza without getting sick, other days the slightest thing can make him sick. His mother and grandfather are also celiacs- she can't even touch it without getting sick for days. He has finally chosen to go gluten free, after a few days of feeling very sick. I am a very picky eater and dearly love my pastas, breads and baked goods. I dearly want to show my support for him. What is the best way to do this? It seems most of those in this forum with spouses with Celiac have chosen to also go gluten-free. Is this the most common choice for spouses of Celiacs? I do understand how it can make cooking much easier, but if I choose to also go gluten free, I do not want to become sensitive to it myself. What is the best way to deal?

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Not eating something will not make you sensitive to it. For example, People usually only eat watermelon 2 months of the year. They aren't sensitive to it when they start eating it again. You could find that you had a sensitivity to something and didn't know it until you deleted it.

You could certainly eat anything when not at home.

For a person starting a gluten-free diet, it can be hard to see others eating things they like in front of them. So, I would think, if you care about him, you would try to keep those foods away from him - at least until he gets used to the diet.

I'm curious why he doesn't want to get an official diagnosis? For many people it helps them to stick to the diet. It also helps thier relatives believe gluten is a real problem and be more supportive.

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Thank You, for the loving support of your family member this way. Your sharing in this will help immensly. You can find substitutes that are good tssting for both of you. I agree that eating the same thing at the same time is the very best for families. Eating together helps to bond us together. Being a willing participant in the diet also helps you to understand what the other is going through.

If you enjoy food now, you can still enjoy it. You may actually increase the variety of what you eat. You may increase the nutrients in what you eat. :P

I got the idea that you do the cooking. There are many recipes for gluten free online. If any allergies arise there are also substitutes available.

Listen to and help through the withdrawl and health effects of the gluten diet. It is simply amazing what the body begins to do.

Diana

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Well, he should stop in here and do some reading. It can be hard to eliminate all the sources of gluten in your diet. It is present in many, many processed foods and not always obvious. If you do go gluten-free it will probalby help him,. Kissing is not a safe activity if you haven't brushed and gargled after eating gluten. Shampoos and vitamins and meds need to be gluten-free also. Sharing pots and pans and condiments like peanut butter and mayo or even a toaster are not ok. It only takes a trace amount of gluten to get the autoimmune process started and it doesn't stop for a couple weeks at least. Baking with regular gluteny flour is not a good idea. There are gluten-free flour mixes available.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take gluten-free vitamins.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

FAQ Celiac com

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101

What's For Breakfast Today?

What Did You Have For Lunch Today?

What Are You Cooking Tonight?

Dessert thread

Easy yummy bread in minutes

How bad is cheating?

Short temper thread

Non celiac wheat sensitivity article

http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ajg2012236a.html

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My significant other has been gluten sensitive most of his life to varying degrees. Somedays he can eat an entire pizza without getting sick, other days the slightest thing can make him sick. His mother and grandfather are also celiacs- she can't even touch it without getting sick for days. He has finally chosen to go gluten free, after a few days of feeling very sick. I am a very picky eater and dearly love my pastas, breads and baked goods. I dearly want to show my support for him. What is the best way to do this? It seems most of those in this forum with spouses with Celiac have chosen to also go gluten-free. Is this the most common choice for spouses of Celiacs? I do understand how it can make cooking much easier, but if I choose to also go gluten free, I do not want to become sensitive to it myself. What is the best way to deal?

Aside from what was said above, if your favorites all involve wheat flour, and assuming you bake and cook with wheat flour in the house, he can have a big problem.

Flour flies and goes airborne, covers everything. You'll find a lot if people who live in split households (one gluten-free, others not) draw the line at having glutenous flours in the house. It's simply too difficult to control and the Celiac gets glutened by getting into minute particles around the kitchen.

So, how you decide to do it is up to you. But I'd bring glutenous baked goods in, not bake them in your house.

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What my spouse did was go gluten free at home. He eats whatever he wants during business travel, sometimes he will get a burger with a regular bun when dining out, but not usually, as he tends to order off the gluten free menu with me so as to lessen problems with cross contamination and leftovers if we get the leftovers bagged for takeout.

If you are not gluten intolerant or celiac, you will not become more sensitive to it over time after omitting it from the diet for a while.

At home, for carbs, he eats his gluten free cereals, rice cakes, rice pasta, corn tortillas, potatoes, beans, and any thing I bake gluten free. Sometimes we get some kinnickinick bagels to keep in the freezer, once in a while a loaf of Udi's bread for him (I don't eat that because it has something else in it that disagrees with me.) If we want pizza, we either make it at home, using either a tortilla (rice) for ultra thin crust, or a home made crust, like from a Chebe mix. There are also a lot of pre- made, frozen gluten free crusts available in health food stores now, but the home-made is better. We also keep a stash of Lara bars around, some gluten free crackers sometimes, along with some gluten free gelato, and he has pre sweetened yogurts that are gluten free - I eat the plain, to which I add whatever I want, as I am more sensitive and cannot do much sugar or corn syrup in foods.

When we travel, even for short trips during the day, we almost always carry a lunch cooler with emergency snacks, so as to be prepared if we get delayed or hungry.

The main difference between normal and gluten free households is that the latter is likely taking a bit more thought and planning to provide food, as opposed to our modern society's reliance on take out and mass production.

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    • I figured I would update those who were wondering.  I have gotten the appt. so far moved up to August 30. I am waiting to have gene testing done via swab for all 3 of my kiddos tomorrow. My daughters celiac antibodies came up negative but her IgA is low which the ped said could cause false negative antibodies for celiac so she will need to see a GI dr. also. The pediatrician is going to call the GI to try to get them in sooner. I am keeping them all on a gluten diet until the GI dr. decides what to do. I am on the cancellation list already for my son, however I am not going to be persistent with my phone calls to them until I have the results of the gene test. I really want that result in my hand before going to the GI dr if I can. Maybe if he is positive, along with his bloodwork and my history they can forgo the endoscopy. But he will eat gluten till then.  My husband and I have been very honest and upfront with him as to what is going on and the possibility of the endoscopy and what that entails and although scared in general he seems ok after assuring him that since I have it he has me to help him every step of the way.  Going through his current diet with him I realized that he is truly on such a low gluten diet that I am actually surprised his bloodwork shows antibodies at all!  So I told him to make a list of allllll the gluten he could possibly think of eating and he needs to pound it until the GI visit or endoscopy. Funny thing is everything he keeps thinking of to want to eat...is already gluten free!  The other night we were at a friends and he asked if he could be done with his hotdog. I made him finish just the bread 😂 Thanks for your help and advise and I will keep y'all posted on both kids!  My oldest is a ok as far as all his antibodies. Just actually had a follow up for other immune issues and all his levels are now normal!
    • I like your plan Cara, I may have to include it in my sons.    Poor little guy is still very very sick. I think he is resisting and cheating, despite having the support of two other siblings and a 100% gluten-free home. 
    • Despite it being a nightmare, I did wait for my kids to get biopsies. At one point I had one severely ill child gluten-free and two more waiting having to eat it. It was worth the wait though and I think long term a biopsy may be worthwhile, especially for school. I have already had issues with schools and camps so having a firm diagnosis has been helpful. 
    • Knowing that the reaction to gluten in celiacs is an uncalled for immune system reaction, I was thinking of how a cure would be possible. Maybe a medicine that somehow turns off the immune system. The only thing that i've heard do that... HIV.  obviously that's way worse than celiac. Just some food for thought.
    • Well, you can probably get an apple or something.  You might be able to get someone to boil you some eggs.  But be careful of things like nuts that should be naturally gluten free.  They have almost always been soaked in a flavor solution that usually containes caramel coloring, "soy" (wheat) sauce and other aditives.  If I am really hungry and must eat in a Chinese restaurant, I order plain white rice and steamed vegetables.  But even so, you must monitor it carefully.  The rice sometimes has other substances added to give it a better texture, and very often the vegetables have in fact had "just a little bit" of soy sauce added.  To be fair, celiac disease is hardly ever found in East Asians, so understandably people are not tuned it to it.  Also, culturally, with the exception of fruits, it is generally thought that the flavor of foods needs to be enhanced, so it is had to find anything natural even in the "western" gorceries. Even in the western restaurants, be careful.  Fish and meat and often vegetables are usually pre-marinated. I will not even attempt to address the issue of cross-comtamination, since that is a whole higher order of things. I do know what I am talking about; I have celiac and have worked here for nearly 7 years.  
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