Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Kid Friendly Dinner Ideas
0

11 posts in this topic

Hi -

I feel like I'm in a rut - giving my 4 y.o. the same things over and over. Can you tell me some things that you give your child for dinner? I (well, he) has a couple of issues. He's autistic and sensitive to texture, so he won't really do meat except hotdogs. We're working on it, but he won't do veggies right now unless they are pureed (i.e. in a smoothie, mashed sweet potatoes, etc.). We give him dairy sometimes but he has been having some odd behaviors over the last week, so we want to eliminate it for a few days to see if that makes a difference. I think the no dairy thing is stumping me the most. He will do beans, eggs, nuts, and tofu.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi -

I feel like I'm in a rut - giving my 4 y.o. the same things over and over. Can you tell me some things that you give your child for dinner? I (well, he) has a couple of issues. He's autistic and sensitive to texture, so he won't really do meat except hotdogs. We're working on it, but he won't do veggies right now unless they are pureed (i.e. in a smoothie, mashed sweet potatoes, etc.). We give him dairy sometimes but he has been having some odd behaviors over the last week, so we want to eliminate it for a few days to see if that makes a difference. I think the no dairy thing is stumping me the most. He will do beans, eggs, nuts, and tofu.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

My kids are 5 and 9. Here are some things they like:

Tacos, with beans and rice

Make your own sushi rolls with whatever he will eat inside (if he'll eat nori)

Black beans and rice (we cook up a bunch of veggies, add a little OJ, and then mash it all up with about 1/2 of the beans. The other beans stay whole. The veggies are therefore pureed.)

Omelets or just plain scrambled eggs or hard-boiled eggs

Does he like potatoes? (mashed, fried, baked, etc.)

Lentils & rice (lentils, V8, rice, really finely chopped veggies, cumin, salt)

Hummus & something to dip in it or gluten-free bread to spread it on.

Pesto (you can make it w/o parmesan to be dairy-free) & gluten-free pasta or spread on gluten-free toast

Plain tofu (my 9 yr old takes this for lunch)

Peanut butter and pretzels

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter has Autism too. We are also vegan. Some of her favourites are:

Cottage pie made with lentils and whatever veg we have, topped with mashed potato

Creamy pasta using coconut cream, roasted veg and gluten-free fettucini

Stir-fry with tofu and heaps of veg

Pasta with tomatoes, lentils, mushrooms, spinach, garlic, chives and black olives

There are more but I can't think just at the moment :(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a book called Special Diets for Special Kids (II) which is casein and gluten-free tips and recipes aimed at kids on the spectrum. I looked at it a few years back and can't remember what it all has. It might have some good ideas for you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




my kids favourite is chicken noodle soup- don't need to add chicken. veggies, flat rice noodles, chicken stock (or veggie stock), sesame oil, oyster sauce, tamari and a bit of sugar.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:) One of my favorite "tricks" is to make things into fun shapes. Michaels and Williams-Sonoma have cookie cutters which are tiny (the size of a quarter or less) in neat shapes--flowers, hearts, geometric shapes. I have "shaped" everything from ham/turkey/cheese/bread/pancakes/zucchini/etc, etc. with those. Somehow shapes/fun decor at dinner or any meal has helped us.

On the shape note, I also bought a pancake frying pan that has 6 little circles to make mini-pancakes. I've also made mini-circle fried eggs in it. The same company makes the same pan with various smiley faces, holiday ones, etc. Could provide some fun!

My kids had a very narrow palate until 6 months AFTER going gluten free. Now the girls are MUCH more adventuresome eaters. I have some concern that one of my girls needs to be casein free also, but I haven't tackled that yet.

Age may also have something to do with what's going on...for us from 3-5.75 yrs was the "narrowest" eating we've seen. Our girls turn 6 in a month.

Oh, and we have one night we call "messy Mondays" where noone has to use utensiles and can be ill-mannered just for fun (within reason). It sort of lifts the spirits too. Maybe there is something goofy your little guy wants to do at dinner?

:) Thinking of you!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Organ have a pastry mix out, I have made the pastry shapes with the cookie cutters and made lentil pies then topped them with a pastry shape. For St Pat's Day, I add green food colouring (Hullaballoo I think it's called, they have vegan, gluten free colours) to the mash on the cottage pie and to the shape on the top of the pies. The other thing is to make lentil patties then serve with mash, peas, corn, etc.

If you have eggs, one of the kids I look after has zucchini slice which is basically made using just eggs, cheese (you can get vegan cheese, we use it for Nachos, Cheezely is the one we use), grated zucchini, diced onion and grated carrot. No flour or anything. He has it in his lunch box every Friday. He has Autism and I have told all my parents that this house is a gluten free environment. If they have their own snacks (I provide meals) they need to be gluten free. The parents are awesome at that, but even still, if kids have their own food, they eat from the "special" plates just for daycare kids and use the "special" utensils, and eat at the "special" table just for daycare kids that's outside and is thoroughly cleaned, just in case there are any traces of gluten in what they have. Most of them send lunch in a container suitable to eat out of if the kids have their own food though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a book called Special Diets for Special Kids (II) which is casein and gluten-free tips and recipes aimed at kids on the spectrum. I looked at it a few years back and can't remember what it all has. It might have some good ideas for you.

I have that book but haven't tried anything out of it yet. I need to. You made me remember another book I have - the ADHD&Autism Cookbook. Made a lentil recipe out of it today (the previous poster gave me the idea to try lentils). It was a huge pain to make - I hope his highness likes it!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[

If you have eggs, one of the kids I look after has zucchini slice which is basically made using just eggs, cheese (you can get vegan cheese, we use it for Nachos, Cheezely is the one we use), grated zucchini, diced onion and grated carrot. No flour or anything. He has it in his lunch box every Friday. He has Autism and I have told all my parents that this house is a gluten free environment. If they have their own snacks (I provide meals) they need to be gluten free. The parents are awesome at that, but even still, if kids have their own food, they eat from the "special" plates just for daycare kids and use the "special" utensils, and eat at the "special" table just for daycare kids that's outside and is thoroughly cleaned, just in case there are any traces of gluten in what they have. Most of them send lunch in a container suitable to eat out of if the kids have their own food though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zucchini slice is baked in the oven.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,338
    • Total Posts
      920,471
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • They didn't suggest any probiotic support. Ultimately the side-effects of this drug stabilized approaching the end of the course of treatment, though after it was finished, I was perhaps a bit improved, but no profound symptom resolution for me. Darn! The search goes on.
    • Thankyou I have found that I became intolerant of dairy and having cut it out feeling better but if I come into accidental consumption the symptoms are similar to that of gluten but not as severe .. Patience ay ?
    • I checked the Gluten Free Watchdog (I subscribe) and did not find this  particular product, but found the company's oat bran flakes which did not list any gluten ingrediants, but barley was found in testing well over 20 parts per million.  I would stick with certified gluten-free cereals, personally.  I think it is "hit or miss" on grain products.    
    • It is normal for other intolerances to become apparent once you remove gluten. I don't know why, perhaps as the immune system is free'd from chasing gluten it finds new targets? A lot of coeliacs find they have to cut out dairy as well for example. It's certainly my number one culprit for skin issues.  It also can take time for removing gluten to have its full effect, as antibodies will remain in the body for up to 6 months. So the reaction could still be to gluten in a way. 
    • I did not re-test my antibodies for a full year after diagnosis but I think your daughter should be checked again in 6 months.  If she does have celiac, and I really am sure she does regardless of what this doc seems to think, they should decrease in 6 months.  If she is fast healer, they could potentially be in the normal range but it varies from person to person. She did show damage in her small intestine but at 4 years of age, damage would not have progressed to the point where this doctor could be convinced it is Celiac.  They set the bar way too high. Kind of silly to require you to damage her insides further to prove it to the AMA. I think she should go gluten-free, as you have stated, and re-scope her in 6 months to see how the original damage looks then. If it is gone, then maybe that would convince them. The 4 out 5 criteria is not done in kids because, I am convinced, of liability issues. They just do not want to get sued if by some small chance, they diagnosed someone who did not have Celiac.  I think the odds of that are pretty slim, when you think about it. Even with a misdiagnosis, eating gluten free will never harm anyone. But as children are minors and cannot legally make medical decisions on their own like adults can, that rule is out for them.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,407
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Poppyann
    Joined