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Gi Or Nutritionist/allergist? Which Would Be Better?


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#1 Pegleg84

 
Pegleg84

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 08:25 AM

Hi all

So, while I have so far avoided any real testing aside from initial screening for Celiac a few years ago (I'm technically self-diagnosed, with clear evidence), I think it's time I was properly tested/screened for the other food intolerances that are popping up. I seem to be intolerant to casein, soy, and possibly eggs, quinoa, and who knows what else.

For those who have gone through this, would you recommend I see a GI to checking things out from the gut angle, or to see an allergist/immunologist/nutritionist/naturalist (they all seem to blend together these days) to test/figure out what I'm actually sensitive to and what to be done from a diet angle.

Also, any advice on reliable testing for intolerances?

I live in Toronto, Canada, have pretty good health insurance. A GI would likely be covered by medicare if I was referred. I'd have to look into whether my insurance will cover allergist/etc.

FYI, I have never had an endoscopy done to test for Celiac (vili damage). I didn't want to wait for the test when I went on the gluten-free diet. Now, the last thing I want to do is ruin 3 years of healing by doing a gluten challenge to get proper testing done.
I am willing to go back on milk/soy/etc for testing purposes.

Thank you!
Peggy
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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.


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#2 mushroom

 
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Posted 13 September 2012 - 09:46 AM

There are no medical tests for food intolerances that I am aware of.

If you can limit your diet initially to things you know are safe foods for you (plain, whole foods, not processed), and then add additional foods one at a time while keeping a food and symptom diary, you should be able to identify the suspects. Of course you drop everything you react to. You might try testing the major food allergens first before moving on to the other lesser known problem foods. This is the only sure-fire way I know. An allergist can only test for allergies, and food intolerances and allergies are most often not co-existent (although they may be - i.e., some celiacs are also allergic to wheat, for example).

Celiacs often show a response to many foods in allergy testing that they are not actually allergic to, just reactive, Some posters have used this testing as a basis for what foods to test first on their elimination diet. If you are not able to eat a food currently, it does not mean you will never be able to eat it.

When you first went gluten free, did you use probiotics/digestive enzymes/L-glutamine or other means to heal up your leaky gut. If new intolerances are still popping up it might be a sign that your gut is not properly healed and additional foods are leaking into your blood stream in a partially digested state. The place to start is with the gut when it comes to preventing food intolerances. (from personal experience :rolleyes: ).
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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