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Sweet Smelling Urine


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27 replies to this topic

#16 psawyer

 
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Posted 22 September 2005 - 06:33 PM

If I understand the US scale, 106 is a good reading. How soon after eating did you test? The timings we worry about are just before eating and two hours after eating. It takes at least half an hour to see the effect of most foods.

Type 1 diabetes (which I have) is an autoimmune disease like celiac disease. A reaction is triggered in the immune system which attacks the islet cells in the pancreas. Unlike celiac, the islet cells do not regenerate: the loss is permanent. In celiac disease, the villi do usually grow back, although it may take a considerable amount of time (weeks or even months).

Type 2 diabetes happens when the pancreas still produces insulin, but the body resists it and needs help. Type 2 is usually, but not exclusively, found in adults whose body mass index is high, and whose life style is sedentary (OK, forget politically correct, overweight people who don't exercise enough).

Very recently, doctors are observing some cases of diabetes where the pancreas is out of action (type 1) and due to weight and lifestyle factors the body is resistant to insulin (type 2). "Double Diabetes" is a scary thought, considering that the gluten-free diet tends to be higher in fat and carbs than a "normal" diet at the best of times.

But keep this in mind: high blood sugar is bad, but for a celiac, gluten is MUCH WORSE. If you have to choose, the celiac rule (gluten-free) must take priority over any other dietary rule, including the diabetiic diet.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#17 BRCoats

 
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Posted 22 September 2005 - 08:48 PM

LOL, Peter! I don't like wading through all the poltically correct jargon either. :) No offense to those of you that do. <_<

Anyway, I think it was only about 20 minutes after I ate...and I didn't eat all that much. But I never do, nor can I with the gastroparesis. It seems like I eat all the time, all throughout the day. I don't really have much of a set schedule, although that has gotten a little better lately.

I will test it tomorrow before eating, and two hours after. Thanks for that info. Guess I should have checked that out before so eagerly poking myself. :lol:

OK. Type 2 is what I think I would have. I have the polycystic ovarian syndrome, and insulin resistance very often goes along with that. But who knows....I could be wrong. Type 2 is what my grandmother has also.

I'm not really all that sedentary. I have my days where I will sit a lot (I homeschool my kids), but I do take about a half mile walk every night, and I do housework too. My BMI is fine. I'm 5'3" and about 117, give or take a few pounds, depending on what time of the month it is. (Sorry if that's TMI). But I've always thought I was thin because of not being able to eat very much at a time. Not because I don't have blood sugar problems.

Thanks for the info, once again!! Can't wait until tomorrow when I get to poke myself again!!! :unsure:

~Brenda, who has now stopped bleeding but has a very sore finger (insert violin music here) :blink:
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~Brenda

Celiac, gastroparesis, PCOD, heart problems, pacemaker.

Diagnosed 7-12-04 via bloodwork. Never had a biopsy, doc didn't think it was necessary (said I would know just by going gluten-free).

gluten-free two weeks after diagnosis (and my last bag of Oreos). :-)

#18 skbird

 
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Posted 23 September 2005 - 10:11 AM

Brenda -

You scored on the Freestyle! In the US the normal range is about 75 - 115. I was always getting results in the 70's and 60's though and thought my meter was broken so I tested my husband and he came back at 140. Then the next time, after he'd had beer and some pasta I tested him and he was 180! I got freaked - that's not horrible but it's on the high side. He usually (used to, at least) drinks about 3-4 beers a night. (BTW since then when I've randomly tested him he's been no higher than 130. I think it was a fluke!)

Look online for test strips. I ordered from this place last time, they had the best price:
http://hocks.com/Mer...roduct_Count=17

Probably a good strategy for now is to test first thing in the morning (fasting) and then before a meal and then 30 mins to an hour after meals. It gets easier and yeah, I've been to the point where I wonder if I'm ever going to stop bleeding.

Hopefully it will turn out you are fine and your other symptoms are just curious wonders in your life... :)

Stephanie
  • 0
Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#19 julie5914

 
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Posted 23 September 2005 - 10:42 AM

Hi, my mom was diagnosed with gestational diabetes that stuck around - they thought it was type 2. They never tested her Insulin LEVEL! I reality, every time her body had a stress, i.e., getting pregnant or sick, her immune system attacked her pancreas and her blood sugar would shoot up even more, eventually to where she couldn't regulate with diet.

So what she actually has is type 1 - autoimmune. She is not insulin resistant. If you are checked for insulin resistance, be sure your insulin levels are also checked. Your glucose leves sound good though. Have you had your kidneys checked? Other autoimmune problems can go for your kidneys.
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Blood work positive
Dx with IBS 5 years ago
Dx with Celiac and gluten-free since 6/17/05

#20 BRCoats

 
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Posted 23 September 2005 - 02:39 PM

Thanks for the link, Stephanie. I'll be sure to check it out, because I'm already almost out of strips. I only had ten, and messed up a few times. :-(

This morning, my fasting blood sugar was 82. Not bad, eh? But then, I ate breakfast, and I usually feel junky about an hour after I eat breakfast, so....I tested it, and it was only an 89. I thought I would be higher than that...aren't you suppose to go higher than six points? Then...I tested two hours after eating breakfast, and it was clear down to 69. So I am really confused. Shouldn't I be higher than that? With my symptoms, I can feel either like my blood sugar is too high, or too low. This morning, I felt like it was really low, and I was shaky, anxious, etc. This is nothing new....happens a lot. For lunch, I tested right before I ate, and was an 88. Again, didn't look too bad. Then I tested two hours later, and I was an 86. So again, I'm not going up much. But at least I didn't lose twenty points either....and I did, by that time, feel a little more stable - not shaky, etc.

So are those numbers good, or bad?

~Brenda
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~Brenda

Celiac, gastroparesis, PCOD, heart problems, pacemaker.

Diagnosed 7-12-04 via bloodwork. Never had a biopsy, doc didn't think it was necessary (said I would know just by going gluten-free).

gluten-free two weeks after diagnosis (and my last bag of Oreos). :-)

#21 psawyer

 
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Posted 23 September 2005 - 03:22 PM

Brenda, with those levels, you don't sound like you have diabetes. 82 fasting is well within the normal range. 69 is a bit low for two hours after eating, buit not alarming. None of your readings are high enough to indicate diabetes to me. But, I am not a doctor, just somebody with two decades of experience with my own type 1 diabetes.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#22 BRCoats

 
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Posted 23 September 2005 - 07:36 PM

Brenda, with those levels, you don't sound like you have diabetes. 82 fasting is well within the normal range. 69 is a bit low for two hours after eating, buit not alarming. None of your readings are high enough to indicate diabetes to me. But, I am not a doctor, just somebody with two decades of experience with my own type 1 diabetes.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


No...I know they're not too high. I definitely felt a low all day. I never did get in the 90's today with my readings. That's what I thought was odd. The reading that was two hours after I ate (the 69) should have been a lot higher, shouldn't it? I found it odd that I dropped so much lower when it should have been higher.

Keep in mind, that since I felt low all day, the reading pretty much indicated that. I am interested to test it on the days where I feel it's too high. Those are the days where I don't feel like eating a thing. Today, since it was low, I ate a lot more than usual. But diabetics don't usually flip-flop like that, do they? They run high all the time??

Sorry I'm so confused and asking so many questions. You guys and gals are jewels for being so patient with me. :)

~Brenda
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~Brenda

Celiac, gastroparesis, PCOD, heart problems, pacemaker.

Diagnosed 7-12-04 via bloodwork. Never had a biopsy, doc didn't think it was necessary (said I would know just by going gluten-free).

gluten-free two weeks after diagnosis (and my last bag of Oreos). :-)

#23 psawyer

 
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Posted 24 September 2005 - 03:17 PM

Sugar levels in diabetics who are taking oral medication or who inject insulin are subject to flip flops Especially for those of use taking insulin (which covers all type 1 and a significant number of type 2 diabetics), there is an equation with four variables to consider:
1. What is my current sugar level?
2. What am I eating (in terms of carbohydrate primarily)?
3. How much fuel do I need (how much exercise in the next few hours)?
4. How many units of insulin am I taking?
Generally, we know #1 for sure from our meter, we should know #2 pretty accurately, #3 is a guess, and so if we miscalculate #4, we can end up too high or too low. More exercise, not enough food, too much insulin (or, for me at least, gluten ingestion) can lead to sudden low blood sugar. Diabetics who are controlled by diet only do not have this worry.
Hope this helps. Brenda, since you are not taking any medication to lower blood sugar, the low readings you see should be a clear sign that you do NOT have diabetes.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#24 BRCoats

 
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Posted 25 September 2005 - 12:00 PM

Brenda, since you are not taking any medication to lower blood sugar, the low readings you see should be a clear sign that you do NOT have diabetes.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

[/quote]

Right. That's what I THOUGHT, but I wanted to make sure. My daughter went to school with a diabetic (who they later found out has celiac!), and he would flip-flop. So he had to take his blood a lot. Sometimes he was too low, so he had to eat something. Sometimes he was too high. So I was confused as to whether diabetics do that a lot.

:)
~Brenda
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~Brenda

Celiac, gastroparesis, PCOD, heart problems, pacemaker.

Diagnosed 7-12-04 via bloodwork. Never had a biopsy, doc didn't think it was necessary (said I would know just by going gluten-free).

gluten-free two weeks after diagnosis (and my last bag of Oreos). :-)

#25 skbird

 
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Posted 26 September 2005 - 07:56 AM

Brenda - your readings sound similar to mine. While 69 on it's own isn't particularly low, if it was 90 15 mins before or something (I'm hypothesizing) then you would feel the effects. A lot of the time when people have hypoglycemic episodes, they don't see that in their blood sugar results, because they test when they feel bad (which is usually when your adrenal system kicks in and gets your blood sugar back up to reasonable levels, which also makes you feel kind of crummy) or because the change in blood sugar levels was rapid, but the new lower number isn't as low as what is considered too low. Generally, at least for my well being, when I see myself falling in the 60's I start paying a lot of attention to my diet. Formerly, one of my favorite things to bring my blood sugar up to normal range when it wasn't doing that on it's own, I would eat a sandwich with sprouted grain bread. That seemed to hold me in the right range for 2-3 hours, like nothing else would. Of course I can't eat that now. What I try to do is eat a complex carb with a fat, like brown rice toast with peanut butter. Peanut butter is my saving grace. Also, a glass of milk (I drink goat milk) is good, has a good combo of fat, sugar and protein. But if you can't have dairy, something else would have to be used.

It does sound like you might have some blood sugar issues. It might be worth your while to order some more strips to just see how you do over a longer period of time, in case you fluctuate. Keep a journal of how you feel, what you eat, and what your blood sugars are. This stuff can be pretty convincing to doctors who might be skeptical of claims of blood sugar issues.

Take care

Stephanie
  • 0
Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#26 BRCoats

 
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Posted 26 September 2005 - 01:49 PM

Brenda - your readings sound similar to mine. While 69 on it's own isn't particularly low, if it was 90 15 mins before or something (I'm hypothesizing) then you would feel the effects. A lot of the time when people have hypoglycemic episodes, they don't see that in their blood sugar results, because they test when they feel bad (which is usually when your adrenal system kicks in and gets your blood sugar back up to reasonable levels, which also makes you feel kind of crummy) or because the change in blood sugar levels was rapid, but the new lower number isn't as low as what is considered too low. Generally, at least for my well being, when I see myself falling in the 60's I start paying a lot of attention to my diet. Formerly, one of my favorite things to bring my blood sugar up to normal range when it wasn't doing that on it's own, I would eat a sandwich with sprouted grain bread. That seemed to hold me in the right range for 2-3 hours, like nothing else would. Of course I can't eat that now. What I try to do is eat a complex carb with a fat, like brown rice toast with peanut butter. Peanut butter is my saving grace. Also, a glass of milk (I drink goat milk) is good, has a good combo of fat, sugar and protein. But if you can't have dairy, something else would have to be used.

It does sound like you might have some blood sugar issues. It might be worth your while to order some more strips to just see how you do over a longer period of time, in case you fluctuate. Keep a journal of how you feel, what you eat, and what your blood sugars are. This stuff can be pretty convincing to doctors who might be skeptical of claims of blood sugar issues.

Take care

Stephanie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Stephanie,

I am going to order some more test strips, because I want to see what the readings are when I "think" my blood sugar is too high. I really do think I fluctuate, and it all depends on where I am in my cycle. The closer I get to my period, the more I struggle with the high end. After my period, I feel like I battle the low, until I start ovulating again. Unfortunately, all my cravings come when I'm ovulating. :angry: And after I start, my blood sugar is low, but so is my appetite. :angry: Ugh....

I don't think my doc would be skeptical at all if I just showed him the numbers. He's not one that convincing is like pulling teeth. :)

Thanks again for that site that sells the strips. That price seems a LOT more reasonable than even Wal-Mart!!

~Brenda
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~Brenda

Celiac, gastroparesis, PCOD, heart problems, pacemaker.

Diagnosed 7-12-04 via bloodwork. Never had a biopsy, doc didn't think it was necessary (said I would know just by going gluten-free).

gluten-free two weeks after diagnosis (and my last bag of Oreos). :-)

#27 skbird

 
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Posted 26 September 2005 - 03:42 PM

That's interesting, because for me, whenever I take supplements that supplement estrogen, I have blood sugar crashes. When I supplement with progesterone, I have fewer crashes, if any. Progesterone is supposed to dominate from ovulation on, with estrogen building before that. So that would fit with your symptoms, too.

Sometimes it seems like everything in my life revolves around my freakin' cycle. Ugh! Only 20 more years until I hit menopause... sigh....

Stephanie
  • 0
Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#28 BRCoats

 
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Posted 26 September 2005 - 05:09 PM

That's interesting, because for me, whenever I take supplements that supplement estrogen, I have blood sugar crashes. When I supplement with progesterone, I have fewer crashes, if any. Progesterone is supposed to dominate from ovulation on, with estrogen building before that. So that would fit with your symptoms, too.

Sometimes it seems like everything in my life revolves around my freakin' cycle. Ugh! Only 20 more years until I hit menopause... sigh....

Stephanie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Stephanie,

When my doc tested my estrogen/progesterone, he found that my estrogen was a bit low, and my progesterone was TEN TIMES higher than it should be. :o So maybe there's something weird going on there...it's probably due to the polycystic ovarian disease....which is linked to insulin resistance. I know there's a link. I just don't know what to do about it. :( And I don't know that the progesterone is that high anymore. That was a while back.

Yup...looking forward to menopause myself. Well, not menopause, but AFTER menopause. :lol:

~Brenda
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~Brenda

Celiac, gastroparesis, PCOD, heart problems, pacemaker.

Diagnosed 7-12-04 via bloodwork. Never had a biopsy, doc didn't think it was necessary (said I would know just by going gluten-free).

gluten-free two weeks after diagnosis (and my last bag of Oreos). :-)




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