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Profession Change?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 intolerant baker

 
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Posted 22 September 2012 - 04:02 PM

Hi all,I am new to this forum and not sure where to post. I have been gluten free for a little over a month and am still feeling poorly. I am wondering if my profession is contributing; I am a cook who scratch bakes at least twice daily and most often three times. I am very diligent about not tasting what I am cooking but I am still getting the horribly itchy bumpy rash on my arms and hands. I have not done anything career-wise except cook and I am worried that I might need to change what I do. The itching is unbearable. Has anyone else found that skin contact causes problems?
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#2 deb445

 
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Posted 22 September 2012 - 04:41 PM

Hi all,I am new to this forum and not sure where to post. I have been gluten free for a little over a month and am still feeling poorly. I am wondering if my profession is contributing; I am a cook who scratch bakes at least twice daily and most often three times. I am very diligent about not tasting what I am cooking but I am still getting the horribly itchy bumpy rash on my arms and hands. I have not done anything career-wise except cook and I am worried that I might need to change what I do. The itching is unbearable. Has anyone else found that skin contact causes problems?


Hmmm. Wondering if there might be a new post for you at an up-and-coming gluten free restaurant?!
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Gluten free for 5 years. Dairy free for years, but now OK with grassfed dairy.

Grain free for 2 years and now pain free.

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#3 ciamarie

 
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Posted 22 September 2012 - 06:26 PM

Yes, those of us with DH (which it sounds like you may have?), generally want to avoid topical gluten. For most of us that means no shampoo or hand lotion with wheat, gluten or oats, but having your hands in it all day would qualify. Is it possible to wear rubber gloves, and perhaps look for work some place that does gluten-free baking?
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#4 cavernio

 
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Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:03 PM

I would never take up a job where I would be baking with glutinous flours, and I don't have a topical reaction to gluten.
Topical reactions, as mentioned above, are definitely a thing.
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diagnosed Jan 2012, bloodwork only
June 2012 positive visual of celiac disease from gastroscopy

#5 intolerant baker

 
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Posted 22 September 2012 - 08:11 PM

Yes, those of us with DH (which it sounds like you may have?), generally want to avoid topical gluten. For most of us that means no shampoo or hand lotion with wheat, gluten or oats, but having your hands in it all day would qualify. Is it possible to wear rubber gloves, and perhaps look for work some place that does gluten-free baking?

Thank you for your response. I thought I was losing it when I noticed I was breaking out again. I don't have a definitive diagnosis of anything, although my GP said I had a gluten rash. The rash coupled with several nutritional deficiencies and anemia made her think it was a gluten issue. I am a little worried about looking for a new job as I have the all too rare in cooking world health insurance where I am at. I will try the glove approach and see what happens.
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#6 kristenloeh

 
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Posted 22 September 2012 - 09:27 PM

I was going to go to school for culinary and baking until I was diagnosed. I was working in a bakery which triggered my Celiac in the first place. I have decided to teach myself what I need to know and go take some gluten free courses and start up my own gluten free bar :} More than likely it is what is messing with you, don't give up your career, just adjust it to work at a gluten free place instead!
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Diagnosed Celiac 04.2012
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Maybe one day I will feel "normal" again. <3


#7 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 23 September 2012 - 03:46 AM

The biggest concern with baking isn't topical exposure it is breathing in the flour dust. Unfortunately yes a change in workplace is going to be needed. You may still be able to cook but you shouldn't bake unless the flours you are using are gluten free. Perhaps you could use your talents freelancing for different restaurants in your area by coming in on off hours and baking gluten free goodies that they can keep on hand for us.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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