Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Arsenic In Rice?
0

29 posts in this topic

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/arsenic1112.htm

As a gluten free family, we do rice chexs, rice crispy cereal to make rice crispy treats, rice cakes, brown rice in recipes like meatloaf, rice as a side, and also I grind our brown rice to make rice flour!!!!! What in the world are we suppose to do???

Rachel

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

My husband and I were just talking about this today :( I am unsure. I haven't read the report because part of me doesn't want to know. I have three kids who all eat gluten-free at home, one being just a year old.

DH suggested testing them for arsenic. Not sure what I think of that...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't actually read the article either because what else can I feed them? my husband read it and said He has no idea what to do. We are very healthy normally and eat all organic and so now that we KNOW we are giving the kids something with this, how can I let them eat it? I have a 7, 5, 3, 1 all on a gluten free diet. The three year old as well as myself are the only ones with *known* gluten issues. Haven't tested the one year old at all. older two girls are just gluten free because our house is gluten free. I don't know what to do.....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This points out arsenic levels in rice grown where cotton used to be grown. Pesticides used to combat the boll weevil contained arsenic.

Chemical pesticides have been used on all sorts of crops for the last century. They are everywhere. You can be "certified organic" if you have not used any chemical pesticides for five years--how long does it take for them to completely leach out of the soil and wash away. Where do they wash away to, anyway?

The point is valid, but is out of context.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband and I have actually been discussing the healthy benefits of organics a lot lately. I know that even with "certified organic" there are still "gray areas". We know the only way to truly know what we are putting in our mouth, is to grown it our self. So we are trying to find a nice middle ground on all of this. Then all the rice stuff comes out and we just know as much rice as we consume, it is significant if it has arsenic. The question is, does the rice we use have it? How can we know? We are trying to use as much almond flour/ qunioa flour for now until we can figure this out.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




By the way we use "rice selects" Organic Texmati Brown rice. I can't find anything on it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way we use "rice selects" Organic Texmati Brown rice. I can't find anything on it.

It's listed in the lower range, but again, what is safe? :( We use the same thing. Plus rice crackers rice cakes, rice cracker breading for chicken, rice flour for pancakes in the morning, Rice Chex, rich crispy cereal...

:(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's listed in the lower range, but again, what is safe? :( We use the same thing. Plus rice crackers rice cakes, rice cracker breading for chicken, rice flour for pancakes in the morning, Rice Chex, rich crispy cereal...

:(

EXACTLY!! WHAT IS SAFE , and is 20 PPB vs 500 PPB really that different ? I have no clue !!! This could be something to be really concerned about OR not !! Anyone have KNOWLEDGE in this area ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's listed in the lower range, but again, what is safe? :( We use the same thing. Plus rice crackers rice cakes, rice cracker breading for chicken, rice flour for pancakes in the morning, Rice Chex, rich crispy cereal...

:(

Agree, What is safe??? To me, it is like saying, well we are only giving our gluten intolerant child a little gluten....what's bad is BAD...period....No matter how "low" the number.....BUT what do we do from here??? Can't very well go back to wheat flour pancakes can we?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the article:

So what's a parent to do? To reduce arsenic risks, we recommend that babies eat no more than 1 serving of infant rice cereal per day on average. And their diets should include cereals made of wheat, oatmeal, or corn grits, which contain significantly lower levels of arsenic, according to federal information.

Well, corn grits or oatmeal sound safer than rice. The article says the brown rice has higher levels of arsenic than the white rice. So quinoa or white rice might be better choices. I guess the oats and corn are options too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a few additional articles on this topic because I am freaking out about the dramatic amount of rice we consume in our gluten-free diet. An article our pediatrician posted recommends rinsing rice before cooking and then cooking it with extra water and then draining off the extra water once it is cooked (cook it like you would make pasta, basically). The article also suggested avoiding rice from the southeastern U.S. because the farm land there contains higher levels of arsenic because of the pesticides that were once used when cotton was being grown there. They suggest rice from California or (even better) from outside the U.S. like India, Thailand etc.

I wish there was more definitive information out there. I am the only known Celiac in the house, but my kids eat 100% gluten-free too because they both inherited the genetics for it from me and my husband, which makes them more likely to eventually develop Celiac, although there is no guarantee they ever will. I thought I was doing a good thing by keeping them gluten-free as a precaution, but now I wonder if I am actually doing damage because of all the rice they consume. There is really no obvious answer to my quandary, at least at this time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, it looks like part of our government is working against us. The article says that arsenic lowers rice yields, so the "Department of Agriculture has invested in research to breed types of rice that can withstand arsenic." Isn't that lovely?

I haven't finished the article, but I'll be switching to white rice only for a while, and testing other things like quinoa asap. I also very much appreciated the Lundberg attitude:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing is... Rice is just what they pointed out to us. How many other things is arsenic in? Well, water. This I know. It's everywhere. But how much is safe to consume? This, we do not know.

I was just reading something yesterday. It was called mono eating. And it said that it was a bad thing to do. Basically it was eating the same thing every day. Which I am very much guilty of. The reasoning behind that is that if they *do* find a problem with that one food, such as the arenic, then if you are eating it every day, you are exposing yourself to a lot of it. Or you could be.

I do know that it is hard to eat a varied diet if you have multiple food intolerances like we do. There was a week recently where my daughter had chicken and a sweet potato for dinner every night. The only thing that varied was the additional vegetable. And she doesn't like a lot of vegetables. So she alternated between green beans, salad and raw baby carrots. Also, now it is just the two of us. I can not have chicken. So if I cook chicken, I am cooking at least 4 half breasts because that is how it comes. Perhaps the better thing for me to do would be to keep two of them out, feed her one, then the other one two or three days later and put the other two in the freezer.

As for pasta, there are other kinds. We used to eat a lot of the corn/quinoa mix until daughter devloped a quinoa allergy. There is plain corn pasta. There is bean pasta although we didn't care for it. I have seen some made of potatoes. Perhaps it would be best to alternate those if you can. Try to find something else to eat some nights instead of the pasta or rice. Perhaps work potatoes or sweet potatoes in once or twice a week. Or the old standard that my mom relied on when she was short on time or money. A pot of soup and popcorn. We are trying to work more beans into our diet. I bought tons. All kinds. We were also trying to eat more brown rice. Until I saw this! I have stomach issues myself and at times (like last night) I don't digest things well. So I turn to white rice. I used to eat instant mashed potatoes but they don't set well with me any more. So now I have to find a new food. The next time my stomach acts up, I will try applesauce.

As for bread... There are many types of gluten-free bread. My daughter likes the Ener-G, but she might be the odd one out. One of her favorites is the corn. I do not think there is any rice flour in it. I used to be able to buy a super good cornbread mix that was just cornmeal. Sadly they quit making it. I know there is other gluten-free cornbread mix on the market but I don't know if it is free of rice flour and we didn't really like what we tried. Ener-G also makes a flax bread and I think (but am not positive) that it was free of rice flour.

I wonder if imported rice would be as bad? I think I read that it was mainly rice from a few states that was the worst.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a few additional articles on this topic because I am freaking out about the dramatic amount of rice we consume in our gluten-free diet. An article our pediatrician posted recommends rinsing rice before cooking and then cooking it with extra water and then draining off the extra water once it is cooked (cook it like you would make pasta, basically). The article also suggested avoiding rice from the southeastern U.S. because the farm land there contains higher levels of arsenic because of the pesticides that were once used when cotton was being grown there. They suggest rice from California or (even better) from outside the U.S. like India, Thailand etc.

I wish there was more definitive information out there. I am the only known Celiac in the house, but my kids eat 100% gluten-free too because they both inherited the genetics for it from me and my husband, which makes them more likely to eventually develop Celiac, although there is no guarantee they ever will. I thought I was doing a good thing by keeping them gluten-free as a precaution, but now I wonder if I am actually doing damage because of all the rice they consume. There is really no obvious answer to my quandary, at least at this time.

But if you think about it... People who eat gluten-free are not the only ones who eat a lot of rice. It is common in a lot of countries! Mexico, Asian countries, India, Africa, even parts of Italy! Some of those people are eating it not only daily but several times a day!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband and I have actually been discussing the healthy benefits of organics a lot lately. I know that even with "certified organic" there are still "gray areas". We know the only way to truly know what we are putting in our mouth, is to grown it our self. So we are trying to find a nice middle ground on all of this. Then all the rice stuff comes out and we just know as much rice as we consume, it is significant if it has arsenic. The question is, does the rice we use have it? How can we know? We are trying to use as much almond flour/ qunioa flour for now until we can figure this out.

I was trying to buy organic foods as much as possible. Unlike some people, I didn't think it was higher in nutrients. Did anyone really think that? I can't see how. But the news and various articles I have read on the subject would make us think so. I just didn't want to be consuming all of those chemicals in my food! But then our finances got tight and I couldn't afford much in the way of organic stuff. I do still prefer the grass fed organic ground beef. I think it tastes better. But as for the other stuff? I don't notice a difference in the way it tastes. I don't seem to be any healthier when I eat organic stuff. Heck I haven't really been sick (aside from things related to medical conditions I already have) in about two years. And I am saving money. So is it any better to buy organic? I don't know.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's listed in the lower range, but again, what is safe? :( We use the same thing. Plus rice crackers rice cakes, rice cracker breading for chicken, rice flour for pancakes in the morning, Rice Chex, rich crispy cereal...

:(

I guess overall we didn't really eat a lot of rice. Me being diabetic, I have to watch my carb intake. Daughter had to give up refined things when she went on the South Beach diet. So I switched to brown rice. I bought a huge bag of it at Coscto but we haven't eaten it yet. I have several smaller bags of various brands to eat up first.

We never were big cereal eaters. Her typical breakfast is sliced apples, baby carrots and maybe a piece of cheese or some nut or seed butter.

Her lunch is similar with maybe some hummus or beef jerky thrown in. She also likes lettuce wraps which I will sometimes make her at home. And she LOVES popcorn! For a time, she was eating that for breakfast. I would pop some for me (always in a pan, never the microwave kind) and make extra for her. I was born in Wichita and there it is commonly eaten like cereal. You put it in a bowl and pour milk on it. I don't happen to like it that way but my mom loves it!

I also made her some breakfast "muffins" using a South Beach recipe. They are basically some egg product (like Egg Beaters), or you can use real eggs that have been whisked up. Then you add whatever cooked chopped meat you want (if in fact you want meat), plenty of cut up veggies like onions, peppers, broccoli, spinach, whatever you like, and some grated cheese (you can leave this out). Pour the mixture into greased muffin tins and bake until the egg is cooked through. Sorry I can't remember the exact time on them. Turns out that she didn't really like these. She's not a big egg eater. But apparently they are quite popular. You can also add some ground flax seed to this mix if you want.

Because we have other food intolerance, we have to think outside of the box, perhaps more than other people would. It is not necessary to eat a starchy carb with every meal. Fruit is a carb too and will provide energy. And then there are beans. They can be used in a variety of ways and they provide protein as well.

Smoothies can make a good breakfast. My daughter was making her own using a ton of spinach, some frozen berries and a little milk. When she could not use dairy she was using rice milk, but you could also use soy milk, hemp milk, almond milk, or if you can handle the carbs, even fruit juice to thin it down.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are great ideas but we have a long list of actual allergies on top of Celiac so most of those won't work for us. I know all about thinking outside the box! lol

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way we use "rice selects" Organic Texmati Brown rice. I can't find anything on it.

Rice Selects Organic Texmati has a high level. Here is the chart from the article which shows the various levels by brand(scroll down):

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm#chart

I eat a lot of rice products as well including the Tinkyada pasta which does not fair well in the list. I feed the Lundeberg short grain brown rice to my chickens every single day and sell their eggs at a farmers' market. I can't sell eggs that are tainted with arsenic with a clear conscious.

Right above the Brands chart in the link above, is a chart which shows you what you and your kids can safely eat each week by product, e.g. rice cakes, rice, rice milk, etc..

It's in a box that says Limit Your Exposure

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, I think it is decided. Going on a more grain-free diet like a low carb diet except we will keep potatoes and stuff. I just can't keep letting my kids have the rice products!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In all honesty, i'm not going to worry about it. Why? Well, were all gonna die of something be it arsnic in the water or food or something else.

I personally cannot afford to not eat rice. beans are a no go for me as i get the worst stomach aches form them. I don't overly eat rice persay, but generally i'll make up about 3 cups a week and spread it out over that week.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will continue to eat rice from India (not u.s.)and wash it well before hand. Which is good practice anyway. Sigh !! nothing is ever, easy is it !!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More info here: http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2012/09/waiter-theres-arsenic-my-rice

As someone pointed out earlier and according to this article, the problem isn't rice in general, but rice in the USA that's the problem. It's basically grown in the South and California.

You might want to check/email/call where manufacturers get their rice from (and then post here!)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked at the chart with the brands and I noticed there was no instant rice listed. I'm wondering if it might be because instant rice is pre-cooked so maybe the water they cook it in rinses off some of the arsenic?

And then I read in the Mother Jones article that there is arsenic in chicken! Guess what I mostly eat? Chicken and rice! And on top of that there is a naturally high level of arsenic in the water in this area.

I can eat potatoes instead of rice but I can't ditch the chicken. The pork here is often inedible. So may times I have bought pork and cooked it only to find it has that nasty, gamey taste, and I end up throwing it away. And I won't eat beef anymore because of all the crap they inject the cattle with. I love bison and I know it is "clean", but at nine dollars a pound I can't afford to eat it every day.

It sure seems that the world (or at least the world of agribusiness) is against us. :(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You think that's alarming? Wait until GMO's - dominantly -make their way into our food supply. DO NOT buy anything produced through genetic modification.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just cleaned out the garage freezer and defrosted it. So next week for me it will be potato products. Sweet potato products for daughter. And meat patties or chicken that she didn't like too much. I am hoping she will forget that she didn't like it. Heh.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,641
    • Total Posts
      921,558
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • They are big on selling books -. They try to spam a lot forums and FB groups. why can't you eat nuts, nut flours, quinoa, hummus and beans? I think I missed that. Those are a good source of protein.  If you can't digest lactose look for a lactose free cheese - like one made from yogurt. at first,I thought life was over.  But with a few years of experience, I have found it isn't that big of a deal. It helps to have an attitude of "I am not here for the food.  I am here for the wine ( or the company . ). Also helps to not care what people think - "I don't care if you think it's odd that I brought my own lunch to the funeral luncheon. "( And it helps that my lunch looks better than theirs lol.)
    • Gracey, It am a mother and I am going to give you some  valuable advice.  You need to keep and document everything related to your health.  Every lab test result, notes from your doctor's visits, etc.  Why?  Because only you are your best health advocate (except for your mom).  Doctors come and go, but it is up to you to manage your health.   When I changed insurance and doctors, I had copies of all my medical records in hand.  My new PCP was impressed.  There was no doubt that I had celiac disease, fractures, Hashimoto's and diabetes, anemia, etc.  I had physical proof.  As an result, she was quick to refer me to a new GI  and order tests to measure my progress  (e.g bone scans).  My family health history chart helped not just me, but other family members.   So, find out if biopsies were taken during your endoscopy.  Get the pathologist's report.  See if your doctor checked for other issues besides celiac disease.   Hugs!  
    • I don't do grieving, bad enough for something that's been taken away in the past but to know my future is pretty much gone now just feels too much. The only time I've forgot about the unfolding nightmare was during my hour or so of sport so need to cling onto that at the moment or I fear going to a very dark place indeed. Yup that SCD site is terrifying, still can't make up my mind if they're giving out useful information to genuinely help people or using scare tactics to sell their books etc. 
    • I agree with all the advice you have been given.  It is excellent!   I just want to add that things will get better.  There is a huge grieving process to go through.  Do not fight it.  You have a right to grieve as your health and lifestyle will change, but you will adapt!  Exercise gently until you feel a bit better.  There is plenty of time to exercise hard later.  Taken this advice from a gal who just rode 40 miles (no biggie you say) this morning  on her bike through the Santa Ana winds (better known as the Devil's winds!).  But I am three years into my recovery.  I took it easy the first six months because I was anemic.  I teach few exercise classes, bike, swim and run and I am in my 50's.   The SCD website?  It can scare the (bleep) out of you.  There was one point that I took from the site and that was to stick to whole nourishing foods.  No rocket science -- just common sense.    
    • Thanks for the replies so far everyone, much appreciated Great, another doctor gets it wrong, how many more times can they make a mess of this diagnosis process?! Bloating had gone down a bit in these first few days of cutting the gluten so I guess expect that to come back. It's one way to have a farewell tour of the gluten foods I guess - if a little or a lot makes no difference may as well go all-in... The doctors didn't diagnose this at all, Google did. If I trusted in the health professionals I'd be blaming the symptoms all on stress and having counselling for it whilst the fire raged on inside me due to a clinical condition they'd missed. Just glad one of doctors agreed to run the test on second time of asking to keep me quiet as much as anything. Believe me I've read that newbie thread multiple times, as well as numerous others around the web. Been doing nothing but since Tuesday when the blood test results came back and each time I go into the comments sections a little bit more of me gives up inside. Seems so many don't ever heal and so many associated complications too. The reality looks bleak apart from a lucky few it seems. In the nicest possible way the vegetarian choice is non-negotiable, it's a core part of what I believe and the thought of eating any form of animal \ fish flesh would make me physically sick (sorry meat eaters) so will have to find some way around it, how I don't know yet. Perhaps lots of this... http://www.pulsin.co.uk/pea-protein-isolate.html The cooking bit is a concern as it's something none of us do well at home, adds to the feeling of being completely lost right now. I kick myself for the decision that lead to the stress as I could've avoided all this. The only thing I can cling onto there is that I was having some pains in the side before that time which I blamed on a muscle strain... maybe that was the early stages, in which case I could feel a bit better knowing it had just come on gradually. With the biopsy and gluten from what I read the villi take a long time to heal up so they'd still see that. With the blood test result as definitive as it was surely the disease is pretty much confirmed? How can it heal enough for non eating gluten to throw a biopsy result yet on the flip side take over a year to heal (that sounds like the best case scenario time-wise from what I've read). Not suggesting anyone is wrong for one second but need to understand how that works with what's going on inside to make any sense of this situation.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,644
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Jross69
    Joined