Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

An Aussie G'day!
0

11 posts in this topic

Hi all, I am a 23 year old female from Geraldton, Western Australia. I have had positive blood work, am awaiting my biopsy results and have had a positive reaction to my new gluten-free diet. I have been gluten-free for only two weeks!!! I am working on creating new eating habits, being very careful and not being tempted (as yet). But I am feeling healthier everyday, so I don't feel I could be tempted. Still have a lot to learn, so if anyone has any advice they would like to offer that they maybe wish they receive when starting this diet that would be great! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Don't be in a hurry to eat at restaurants until you have mastered the nuances of the diet.

Don't go running out right away and buying substitute gluten free foods for everything you are used to eating. Eat a mostly whole foods diet to start, along with a good gluten free bread and some gluten free pasta. Save the scrutiny of supermarket labels for a later time :)

Buy a crockpot and put it to good use (along with a crockpot cookbook - if necessary - although you can throw a bunch of things in a crockpot and it will usually come out good if you are at all used to cooking.

Develop a thick hide and don't be offended at how people react to your diet. Don't make a big deal of it either - just a simple "no thank you" when refusing food will often work, or "I don't feel well when I eat that". It is not necessary to educate the whole world to gluten free although in some circumstances it will be appropriate. The exception to this is when you start eating in restaurants and then you must tell them you are celiac or they will think you are following the fad, trendy, gluten free way of eating and won't take enough care with your food. They must know that gluten will make you sick, that you have celiac disease and will take you seriously.

So glad you are feeling better gluten free. Keep up the good work, and welcome to the board. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't be in a hurry to eat at restaurants until you have mastered the nuances of the diet.

Don't go running out right away and buying substitute gluten free foods for everything you are used to eating. Eat a mostly whole foods diet to start, along with a good gluten free bread and some gluten free pasta. Save the scrutiny of supermarket labels for a later time smile.gif

Buy a crockpot and put it to good use (along with a crockpot cookbook - if necessary - although you can throw a bunch of things in a crockpot and it will usually come out good if you are at all used to cooking.

Develop a thick hide and don't be offended at how people react to your diet. Don't make a big deal of it either - just a simple "no thank you" when refusing food will often work, or "I don't feel well when I eat that". It is not necessary to educate the whole world to gluten free although in some circumstances it will be appropriate. The exception to this is when you start eating in restaurants and then you must tell them you are celiac or they will think you are following the fad, trendy, gluten free way of eating and won't take enough care with your food. They must know that gluten will make you sick, that you have celiac disease and will take you seriously.

So glad you are feeling better gluten free. Keep up the good work, and welcome to the board. smile.gif

I was def in too much of a hurry to eat out I think..and taking too many 'risks'. I am not being careful enough and paying the price! especially experiencing bad 'brain fog' atm. But at least I am realising and know now that I have a LOT to improve on.

I think it is good advice to just say "no thanks" to food.. cos I feel like coeliac is all I talk about lately (I must sound annoying as).

I am struggling to find more wholegrains in my diet and squirm at paying $7 for a loaf of gluten-free bread or for a small box of gluten-free cereal. Why does it have to be so expensive.

Oh and I have been using my slow cooker heaps lately! Heaps easy.

Thanks for your comments and advice.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Join the WA Coeliac Society ..

New members are provided with a resource kit that includes:

•Coeliac Australia's Handbook

•Coeliac Australia's Recipe Book

•Coeliac Australia's Ingredient List for label reading

•Information on gluten free foods and eating out in WA

•A back issue of The Australian Coeliac

They also run workshops and supermarket tours ....

Yes I will need to do this. I really need the extra support!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello from Perth! It took a bit for us to understand how important an unprocessed foods diet was for us. We were living in the States and recently moved to Australia, in part because living gluten free is proving to be much easier for us here. We really enjoy going to all the farmer markets that are available here. If you do get cravings, just go for some of the gluten free stuff made in Australia. They make some very nice gluten free foods here. I would love to hear more about gluten free in Geraldton, as we want to head up that way. We are planning a trip to Esperance soon, and we have had no trouble travelling throughout the Southwest. Of course, we primarily go to markets and make our food, but we often stumble on some really great gluten free eats here. We love Australia's awareness of gluten free!

Welcome to gluten free living!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah yes, Aus, home of the gluten-free corn thins! I get corn thins at a local organic market near DC. They make a nice sub for rice cakes. Corn tortillas are a nice sub for bread and generally much cheaper than a gluten-free bread. You can rinse them in water and nuke them or warm them in covered skillet to soften.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take gluten-free vitamins.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello from Perth! It took a bit for us to understand how important an unprocessed foods diet was for us. We were living in the States and recently moved to Australia, in part because living gluten free is proving to be much easier for us here. We really enjoy going to all the farmer markets that are available here. If you do get cravings, just go for some of the gluten free stuff made in Australia. They make some very nice gluten free foods here. I would love to hear more about gluten free in Geraldton, as we want to head up that way. We are planning a trip to Esperance soon, and we have had no trouble travelling throughout the Southwest. Of course, we primarily go to markets and make our food, but we often stumble on some really great gluten free eats here. We love Australia's awareness of gluten free!

Welcome to gluten free living!

WOW that is a big move! Glad to hear you are enjoying it. I think I am lucky to be in Australia as I have been discovering great gluten free foods... sometimes I think it would be a bit easier to live in the city (as there are more options).

But Geraldton isn't too bad.. there are quite a few restaurants that cater Gluten-free that are great! And Woolworths, Coles and most IGA supermarkets here have vast gluten-free sections. There is also the farmer's markets.

Some restaurants you may want to visit in Geraldton are, (Geraldton restaurants are more expensive than Perth)

L'Italliano's - has amazing gluten pasta, they also occassionally have gluten-free pizza bases but never had them the two times I wanted it!! So yet to try. But if you called in advanced and booked I am sure they could ensure they have it.

Salt Dish - has the freshest and most flavoursome food. Only open for breakfast and lunch, Tues-Sat. Although, a bit expensive - it is probably my favourite treat! Has gluten-free items marked on the menu, and there is a few.

Tide's Restaurant - Overlooking the City (good way to see surroundings), yet to try but have heard only good things. My dietician, who is coeliac recommends it.

Also, a cute place to visit is Culinary HQ, they sell gourmet foods but you can buy pre-made meals to dine-in or takeaway but you can actually buy the sauces, toppings, and some of the ingredients to make the meals yourself. The staff can tell you what is gluten-free. And they also sell delicious macarons (naturally gluten-free).

But I am a bit of a foodie myself so I feel lucky I enjoy making (and eating) whole foods which helps. I also buy my veg from a vegie stall from a local.. tastes so much better.

Hope that helps with your Geraldton visit!! If you want help with more info about geraldton, I'd be happy to help.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah yes, Aus, home of the gluten-free corn thins! I get corn thins at a local organic market near DC. They make a nice sub for rice cakes. Corn tortillas are a nice sub for bread and generally much cheaper than a gluten-free bread. You can rinse them in water and nuke them or warm them in covered skillet to soften.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take gluten-free vitamins.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

My biopsy results did come back positive so I have been gluten-free for about 2-3 months (not long).

Yes, I love corn thins.. I acutally have them for lunch today. They are great because they are high in fibre and can replace bread! I normally top mine with hommus, ham and tomatoes.. mmm. I am yet to find a corn tortilla that I like, do you know any good brands? I found a gluten-free wrap (a bit similar to lebanese bread), I plan to make a pizza with it!!

In the new year, I will cut out dairy and alcohol for a while I think and see if that helps as I am still experiencing some sickness :(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My biopsy results did come back positive so I have been gluten-free for about 2-3 months (not long).

Yes, I love corn thins.. I acutally have them for lunch today. They are great because they are high in fibre and can replace bread! I normally top mine with hommus, ham and tomatoes.. mmm. I am yet to find a corn tortilla that I like, do you know any good brands? I found a gluten-free wrap (a bit similar to lebanese bread), I plan to make a pizza with it!!

In the new year, I will cut out dairy and alcohol for a while I think and see if that helps as I am still experiencing some sickness :(

HI Brownie

Mission brand corn tortillas are what I like. They have white corn and yellow corn varieties. I like the yellow corn versions better. The yellow are thinner and more flexible. Corn Thins with peanut butter are a great snack! Or with guacamole. I get them in Maryland in Hyattsville a the Yes Organic Market. Just in case someone local is looking for them, I know you are near the source of them though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,634
    • Total Posts
      921,526
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I've been diagnosed with celiac a few months ago I thought that I had it for a while now it runs in the family.  I found out I had it a few months back when I ate chick fi a sandwich and had to go to the ER because I couldn't stop throwing up. They didn't know what it was and it took a few more months for anyone to take me seriously and find out what's wrong   Anyways I've gone gluten free now and I still have pains whenever I eat ANYTHING. It's cramping and burning and feels like my stomach is on fire.  I also have pains...below which I'm not sure what it is.  I ate a salad today, and now i'm in pain the salad had cheese, onion on it no dressing or any breading... Maybe I should stay away from cheese, I think it may be lactose and can't eat soy.   I ate some gluten free chex the other day with rice milk and ended up in pain.. I don't know maybe it's more than just celiac. I don't know if this is normal for people just going gluten free...maybe there was some hidden gluten in those foods. I don't know.   All i know is that this pain is hurting me and I'm tired. Thanks for reading...this is my first post.
    • I found my gas issues were caused by carbs, and sugars, something about how the bacteria in my gut changed and started making me gassy and extremely bloated when they got a hold of any thing more then a tbsp of grains, beans, fruit, or starch carbs. And no amount of medicine helped. Changed to 1/4 servings of those and mostly protein, fat diet. As for vitamin supplements I found I have to take B vitamin supplements 3 times a day to not go zombie mode. I personally found Liquid Vitamins Energy & Stress and the Nero-logic from them helps along with the occasional 1/2 bottle of 5 hour. As to carbonated water I avoided it when bloated cause it made me feel worse.
    • Butterbean, do go have a read of the dermatitis herpetiformis section.  See if anyone's story sound familiar to what you're experiencing.
    • Hi all. Well, it's been around twenty days since I've been taking Gas-X like meds (with simethicone), but no relief. Maybe I should drink bigger dose... Currently, I'm taking 80 mg four times per day.
      I'm so exhausted, both mentally and physically... Anyway, I have two questions:
      First, is it good or bad to drink mineral/carbonated water if you have severe trapped gas like me?
      Second: Is it possible to regain some physical strength/relieve fatigue with vitamin supplements? Thanks in advance.
    • I have had so many issues with my teeth--I keep getting decay and I have had filling after filling.  This past week, my dentist told me I may need a crown, which is pricey. I also have two missing teeth, which was a genetic thing that runs in my family. I am sick of hygienists telling me I am not doing enough brushing, flossing rinsing.  I do all three religiously (can't even imagine how bad my mouth would be if I didn't...)  Thankfully, last time I had my teeth cleaned, the hygienist said that my mouth was the cleanest one she had seen in years. And, she said, "something happened to your teeth developmentally." I explained how I had undiagnosed celiac disease many years. I am only 31... It is really disheartening.   What do you guys do to afford all this dental care?  My insurance doesn't cover a whole lot.  Thankfully, my dentist has felt bad and gives me discounts here and there.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,639
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    NickyW_UK
    Joined