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Sleepovers?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 rami

 
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Posted 27 September 2012 - 11:29 AM

So my newly diagnosed 8-year old would like to spend the night at his friend's house this weekend and I don't know how to feel about it. I hate to deprive him of some of the things I loved the most as a kid but I am terrified about this. I figured I could prepare his dinner and breakfast so there are no concerns but don't want to scare his friend's parents. Any thoughts for those with experience?
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#2 Mizzo

 
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Posted 27 September 2012 - 11:42 AM

I would emphasize hand washing , no sharing of foods or anything that goes in the mouth ie: lip gloss, instruments , lollipops .

Provide all the food , and don't stress about it. (although we all did and do still ) LOL
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#3 Roda

 
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Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:07 PM

Ditto what Mizzo said. Both my boys spend the night with their friends and I send them their dinner and breakfast. I also send snacks that they can share. They both are pretty good at knowing what they can and can't eat. If offered they are allowed to eat fresh fruits/raw veggies, cheese sticks and known safe yogurts/fruit snacks/candy. I have explained the CC risk and the need to wash the fruits/veggies and hands before they are given to them.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#4 Darn210

 
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Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:31 PM

My daughter usually eats supper before she goes. Takes dry cereal (chex) that she can add milk to for breakfast. She takes a snack to share (microwave popcorn and sometimes fruit chew snacks). She knows she can eat prepackaged safe items (string cheese sticks, yogurts, etc) but if your son isn't ready for that yet, tell him to only eat what he brings.

Whenever it is a "new" friend, I tell the parents what my daughter's reaction is (she gets nauseous and if really bad, vomits) so they don't freak out about the possibility of an anaphylaxis type event.
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#5 kvanrens1

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 08:26 AM

My daughter has a sleep over tonight. I checked with the Mom and they are having pizza and doughnuts (her daughter did not want birthday cake) so I made a gluten free pizza last night and pulled a gluten free doughnut out of the freezer and will send them with my daughter. I will also send lots of snacks and gluten free cereal bar for the morning (they are having monkey bread). Have not tried to make a gluten free version of monkey bread so the cereal bar will have to do :)

My daughter already feels "different" because of her diet. For her, it is important to have the gluten free version of the food they are having. Extra work and planning for me but so worth it for her health and happiness.
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Daughter, age 9, is gluten sensitive, growth hormone deficient, pancreatic insufficient (now resolved), severe lactose intolerance, and other food sensitivities
Blood test/biopsy negative for celiac disease
Enterolab positive for gluten sensitivity
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Gluten Free since March 2012


#6 MitziG

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 05:14 PM

My kids stay over all the time, they know the drill. They take a cooler full of snacks (I include extra for the other kid) and I usually make something kid friendly that can be microwaved- mac and cheese, pancakes, spaghetti..etc) I send a loaf of bread, some PB&J, gluten-free cereal and a bunch of fruit. Make sure to send the hot food in a micro safe dish so you don't have to worry about cc. Yes, its a pain, but the good friends' mmoms get used to it and understand. They appreciate not having to worry about poisoning my kid, and my kid loves all the gluten-free goodies that I don't usually buy (like expensive gluten-free chicken nuggets or ravioli!)
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#7 GwenO

 
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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:05 PM

My daughter goes on sleepovers. She takes food with her and shares it with her friend No problems so far.
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#8 Juliebove

 
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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:34 AM

My daughter usually eats supper before she goes. Takes dry cereal (chex) that she can add milk to for breakfast. She takes a snack to share (microwave popcorn and sometimes fruit chew snacks). She knows she can eat prepackaged safe items (string cheese sticks, yogurts, etc) but if your son isn't ready for that yet, tell him to only eat what he brings.

Whenever it is a "new" friend, I tell the parents what my daughter's reaction is (she gets nauseous and if really bad, vomits) so they don't freak out about the possibility of an anaphylaxis type event.


That is pretty much what we do too. If she does eat dinner there, I usually send something for her. She used to have one friend whose household was not only gluten-free but she and her dad shared many of their food intolerances. That mom and I had no problems with the other person preparing food because we didn't even keep stuff in the house that could be a problem. But other people don't always get it. One person was going to serve taco salads for dinner which would have been fine, but the corn tortilla bowls she was going to serve them in, also had wheat. People who don't have to avoid this stuff don't always get it. In the end, she opted for something else. I can't remember what. But I made the same thing for my daughter and sent it over.

One thing that my daughter has always been careful about is food that would be safe but it shared. She got upset at a party because they put out a lovely vegetable tray but there were also wheaty things that people were eating with their hands. So she couldn't eat the baby carrots and olives that she really wanted.
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