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How Do You Decide?


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19 replies to this topic

#16 Persei V.

 
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Posted 01 October 2012 - 05:02 AM

My way is kind of unsafe to do. Since I am fairly tolerant to gluten (and I have been improving recently, 6 slices of gluteny cake and my stomach only yawned for half of a day), I just eat things without much control. Sometimes I feel something is not right soon, sometimes I will only realize when I am full-blown glutened and the damage is done.

I don't think this is a safe method for Celiacs or people too sensitive... I have non-celiac gluten intolerance and even so, it is really mild because I didn't take long to figure it out.
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Lactose free: 8/6/2006
Gluten and dairy free: 5/2/2012
Grain free: 11/12/2012

I am able to eat somre processed foods again (chocolate, lollipops, soysauce).

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#17 mushroom

 
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Posted 01 October 2012 - 08:28 AM

The way I did it, not necessarily recommended, was not at all methodical, and the sequence is set out in my signature block.

I had GI problems (cramping and pain) as a child from breakfast cereals (wheat), but outgrew them as a teenager (and also stopped eating cereals, albeit unconsciously, after leaving home.) Up until 1969 I had pretty much a cast iron stomach and had a friend who commented she loved to go out to eat with me because I could eat ANYTHING.

In 1969 I started working with a group who ate a lot of Mexican food, my first introduction to it -- I know, I lived a sheltered life -- and began having digestive troubles. I tried to avoid Mexican restaurants but hubs loved Mexican food. I didn't give any thought to food intolerances.

I had to quit caffeine in 1973 because I had spent too much time working second jobs in espresso bars and sampling too much of the owner's product -- sensitization! :P Racing heart and insomnia, and I mean big time!!!.

Gradually over the years I began having more and more digestive issues, not just Mexican food. Hard to pinpoint what it was.

In approx. 1990 I worked across the street from a frozen yogurt place and often mid-afternoon someone would go across the street and get some. I was always running for the bathroom about half an hour after eating it. One of my workmates was lactose intolerant and she diagnosed me. Eliminated milk, ice cream, frozen yogurt, cream. Other dairy didn't bother me.

During the 90's discovered that I always felt bad when I ate pasta so slowly dropped that from my diet. Could still eat a whole baguette of french bread with no problem, or so I thought.

During the 90's started having episodes of extreme bloating and gas, especially after eating things like corn chips, potato chips, popcorn, all the party snack-type things. Bloating was so bad I would faint. Bit embarrassing really.. :o Finally began to suspect food, but was sit corn, wheat, potatoes.....???

Life continued on, with the fainting (slow learner here) until I developed rheumatoid arthritis, ultimately diagnosed as psoriatic arthritis. Rheumatologist knew nothing about celiac or autoimmune diseases. I knew someone with ankylosing spondylitis (autoimmune rheumatoid disease) who had dropped gluten from his diet to treat his AS. I decided to give it a trial for my PsA. Was amazed when my GI symptoms improved but not my arthritis.

However, after dropping gluten, I developed lots of rashes, itches, hives and discovered I was sensitive to soy (and corn, of course -- still fainted from that one -- so dropped both of those. Then my bloating problem transitioned into a manifestation of atrial fibrillation (both that and the fainting coming from the vagus nerve) and it was being precipitated by something else I was eating. I knew that nightshades were bad for arthritis, and discovered that baked potatoes gave me hives. Dropped potatoes, had problems with tomatoes so dropped all nightshades. Next food to lose was legumes. When I had rid my pantry of gluten I had found lots of beans, lentils, split peas, but for some subconscious reason I was not really using them. I had stopped eating refried beans. Then I started having reactions to green beans and green peas, so there went the legumes.

Without zingy tomato sauces and salsas my taste buds cried out for stimulation and I apparently overdid lemon and lime juice - those were the last foods I have had to drop because I was breaking out in hives again.

Like GottaSki, discovered lectins and realized that all the foods I did not tolerate were high in lectins. Luckily I seem to tolerate dairy lectins okay. I can also now tolerate potato starch, corn starch, and of course lactose. I believe the reason I tolerate the starches is because they are highly refined, and the lectins are contained in the outer coverings of the plants as a protective layer for the plant against birds and insects - hence baked potatoes and any corn where the whole kernel is ground into the product are things I cannot eat.

So that's what happens when you are a slow learner and in denial. :rolleyes:
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#18 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 01 October 2012 - 09:11 AM

Listening to others doesn't work well for me. I react to lots of things which others don't and sometimes I don't react when others say that they do.

If I am experiencing symptoms, I eliminate one food at a time for a week and see if I feel any better. Then I reintroduce it to see if I get better or worse. I read all I can to help me to decide what to eliminate first, as I want to get better as soon as possible. This is a tedious, slow process, but it is worth it in terms of gains in health which have been remarkable.

If I am not experiencing symptoms, I add one food at a time and don't add anything else new for a week. I start with a small amount so that if I do get a reaction from that, I don't give myself a bad reaction. I gradually increase the amount I try over the week. Again, I read all I can and ask lots of questions to decide what to try.

I hope that helps. I am in the super sensitive category.
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#19 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 01 October 2012 - 10:59 AM

The way I did it, not necessarily recommended, was not at all methodical, and the sequence is set out in my signature block.

I had GI problems (cramping and pain) as a child from breakfast cereals (wheat), but outgrew them as a teenager (and also stopped eating cereals, albeit unconsciously, after leaving home.) Up until 1969 I had pretty much a cast iron stomach and had a friend who commented she loved to go out to eat with me because I could eat ANYTHING.

In 1969 I started working with a group who ate a lot of Mexican food, my first introduction to it -- I know, I lived a sheltered life -- and began having digestive troubles. I tried to avoid Mexican restaurants but hubs loved Mexican food. I didn't give any thought to food intolerances.

I had to quit caffeine in 1973 because I had spent too much time working second jobs in espresso bars and sampling too much of the owner's product -- sensitization! :P Racing heart and insomnia, and I mean big time!!!.

Gradually over the years I began having more and more digestive issues, not just Mexican food. Hard to pinpoint what it was.

In approx. 1990 I worked across the street from a frozen yogurt place and often mid-afternoon someone would go across the street and get some. I was always running for the bathroom about half an hour after eating it. One of my workmates was lactose intolerant and she diagnosed me. Eliminated milk, ice cream, frozen yogurt, cream. Other dairy didn't bother me.

During the 90's discovered that I always felt bad when I ate pasta so slowly dropped that from my diet. Could still eat a whole baguette of french bread with no problem, or so I thought.

During the 90's started having episodes of extreme bloating and gas, especially after eating things like corn chips, potato chips, popcorn, all the party snack-type things. Bloating was so bad I would faint. Bit embarrassing really.. :o Finally began to suspect food, but was sit corn, wheat, potatoes.....???

Life continued on, with the fainting (slow learner here) until I developed rheumatoid arthritis, ultimately diagnosed as psoriatic arthritis. Rheumatologist knew nothing about celiac or autoimmune diseases. I knew someone with ankylosing spondylitis (autoimmune rheumatoid disease) who had dropped gluten from his diet to treat his AS. I decided to give it a trial for my PsA. Was amazed when my GI symptoms improved but not my arthritis.

However, after dropping gluten, I developed lots of rashes, itches, hives and discovered I was sensitive to soy (and corn, of course -- still fainted from that one -- so dropped both of those. Then my bloating problem transitioned into a manifestation of atrial fibrillation (both that and the fainting coming from the vagus nerve) and it was being precipitated by something else I was eating. I knew that nightshades were bad for arthritis, and discovered that baked potatoes gave me hives. Dropped potatoes, had problems with tomatoes so dropped all nightshades. Next food to lose was legumes. When I had rid my pantry of gluten I had found lots of beans, lentils, split peas, but for some subconscious reason I was not really using them. I had stopped eating refried beans. Then I started having reactions to green beans and green peas, so there went the legumes.

Without zingy tomato sauces and salsas my taste buds cried out for stimulation and I apparently overdid lemon and lime juice - those were the last foods I have had to drop because I was breaking out in hives again.

Like GottaSki, discovered lectins and realized that all the foods I did not tolerate were high in lectins. Luckily I seem to tolerate dairy lectins okay. I can also now tolerate potato starch, corn starch, and of course lactose. I believe the reason I tolerate the starches is because they are highly refined, and the lectins are contained in the outer coverings of the plants as a protective layer for the plant against birds and insects - hence baked potatoes and any corn where the whole kernel is ground into the product are things I cannot eat.

So that's what happens when you are a slow learner and in denial. :rolleyes:


That sounds sort of where I have been the last 20 or so years. Finding out by unstructured means. I have occassionaly forgot that I had problems with certain things only to figure it out the next time.

Diana
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#20 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 01 October 2012 - 11:03 AM

My way is kind of unsafe to do. Since I am fairly tolerant to gluten (and I have been improving recently, 6 slices of gluteny cake and my stomach only yawned for half of a day), I just eat things without much control. Sometimes I feel something is not right soon, sometimes I will only realize when I am full-blown glutened and the damage is done.

I don't think this is a safe method for Celiacs or people too sensitive... I have non-celiac gluten intolerance and even so, it is really mild because I didn't take long to figure it out.


I just remembered that when I used to bake delicious homemade wheat bread that I would bloat. My belly looked really big, but it caused no pain. It is just cosmetic, though.
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