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Gluten-Free Bakeries - Bit Of A Long Shot!
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Hi there, only just joined but have noticed a mainly USA biased emphasis, so.....

it's a long shot but just wanted to know if anyone in the Bristol (UK) area knows of any gluten-free bakeries OR decent gluten-free bread? I've tried a few supermarket sliced bread options and they're not great. Perhaps my only option is to make my own??? Thanks....

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More often than not, it is better to make your own :) and less expensive.

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Hi there, only just joined but have noticed a mainly USA biased emphasis, so.....

it's a long shot but just wanted to know if anyone in the Bristol (UK) area knows of any gluten-free bakeries OR decent gluten-free bread? I've tried a few supermarket sliced bread options and they're not great. Perhaps my only option is to make my own??? Thanks....

I am in the US but have traveled to Britain quite often. I find the Genius bread is quite good for a store bought bread but, as others have said, fresh baked bread is always the best. Have you tried Genius yet? I like their brown bread.

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Hi

I quite liked the Genius brown. Warburtons have started doing one recently too which is reasonable.

I cant handle much processed gluten-free stuff personally.

I would recommend Doves Farm products if you have not tried. They do a great flour range (make sure you dont get their wheat one accidently). We make great cakes with their self raising gluten-free flour, just used in standard recipes.

The breakfast cereals are pretty good, and I am in love with the 100% Brown rice pasta and spaghetti at the moment.

I have found their stuff in most supermarkets and health food shops.

Welcome!

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I am in the US but have traveled to Britain quite often. I find the Genius bread is quite good for a store bought bread but, as others have said, fresh baked bread is always the best. Have you tried Genius yet? I like their brown bread.

Yeah I'm coming to the end of a loaf of Genius white bread now. It is indeed the best one I've tasted in my limited time of trying gluten-free breads. I've also tried a brown one called 'Yes You Can' from Roberts Bakeries. That one wasn't as tasty. Another thing I've noticed is I'm more mindful of getting fibre now I'm not eating normal wholemeal bread and wholegrain cereal, and the gluten-free white breads seem to have MORE fibre than the brown ones. Seems nonsensical to me. Also, why on earth are the loaves of bread so small? Such a rip-off.

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2 reasons the loaves are small -

Historically bread in the uk had to be in standard 400 or 800 g loaves, and it only changed a couple of years ago and most manufacturers haven't changed.

Second, its damn hard to make a large loaf which doesn't collapse or end up full of holes!

We have Mr Mindwarp to thank for these gems of wisdom.

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Gosh, I've just got back from the UK (British living in NZ) and I was really impressed by the gluten free bread in the supermarket. Tescos had ciabatta rolls which were really nice and I think there was a brand called genius which was yummy, could eat it for sandwiches - all the supermarket gluten free bread here has to be toasted. Also your supermarket gluten-free pasta is heaps better than ours

So be grateful, haha!

I'm sure there will be gluten-free bakeries locally. We have two in Auckland, up until last week I only knew of one - the others been there for years apparently. Just a case of knowing. Somtimes major digging and venturing into new areas is needed.

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Oh and while it can seem like nirvana, the bread from the gluten free bakeries can be hit and miss. And just as, if not more expensive.

(I have currently got some foil wrapped gluten-free pizza bread in my freezer from the gluten-free bakery - can't wait to see what it's like, it feels like french bread, I'm sure I will be disappointed!)

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I was in Birmingham recently for a meeting, and for lunch I got sandwiches on Genius rolls, and was pleasantly surprised at how good they were. Lots of interesting gluten-free stuff in Tesco as well.

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Glutafin fresh sliced bread is now the best I've found. Their long-life bread isn't quite as good ;-)

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