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Amy's Burrito's
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I know this topic is ongoing. Has anyone gotten info from the company as to what the parts per million are? I have eaten the gluten-free burrito's lately and have noticed some extra trips to the loo.

I usually stay away from her stuff due to bad things I have heard, but I guess now that I am feeling much better I got a little lazy having to cook for lunch.

I will switch to gluten freeda's burritos, but they are a little smaller than Amy's, but worth it if they are in a dedicated facility...

thanks everyone!!

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Did you ask the company? This is from thier website:

. I have several food allergies. Is there a possibility of cross contamination in your facility?

A. Amy's Kitchen recognizes the needs of our customers who have allergies or sensitivities to nuts, gluten, certain spices, etc. Amy's always fully discloses all ingredients (except for specific spices used in the product) on the ingredient statement and will answer any questions that will help consumers decide what products they can safely consume.

A wide range of activities and cross-checks are completed to ensure that cross-contamination and/or inadvertent use of the wrong ingredient does not occur in our facilities. Examples include:

-Full shift manufacture of products with complete clean-up of all food contact surfaces between products. Pieces of equipment that come in contact with food are cleaned, sanitized and inspected prior to the manufacture of the next product.

-Inspection of all incoming raw materials to assure they are free from contamination.

-Separate item numbers for all ingredients and packaging materials; these are checked by two individuals on receipt of the ingredient and three people on use of the ingredient to confirm the correct item is used.

-Use of colored tags, papers and containers in production as an addition visual check to ensure intermediate components are not interchanged.

-Designated areas for flour and nonfat dry milk use to control airborne allergens and minimize spread.

-Bar code readers at packaging lines to ensure correct package is used with each product.

-Analysis for gluten in our in-house allergen lab:Each manufacturing run of a Gluten Free product is tested to ensure it complies with the FDA definition of Gluten Free (<20 ppm).

-Potentially problematic ingredients are screened in

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Did you ask the company? This is from thier website:

. I have several food allergies. Is there a possibility of cross contamination in your facility?

A. Amy's Kitchen recognizes the needs of our customers who have allergies or sensitivities to nuts, gluten, certain spices, etc. Amy's always fully discloses all ingredients (except for specific spices used in the product) on the ingredient statement and will answer any questions that will help consumers decide what products they can safely consume.

A wide range of activities and cross-checks are completed to ensure that cross-contamination and/or inadvertent use of the wrong ingredient does not occur in our facilities. Examples include:

-Full shift manufacture of products with complete clean-up of all food contact surfaces between products. Pieces of equipment that come in contact with food are cleaned, sanitized and inspected prior to the manufacture of the next product.

-Inspection of all incoming raw materials to assure they are free from contamination.

-Separate item numbers for all ingredients and packaging materials; these are checked by two individuals on receipt of the ingredient and three people on use of the ingredient to confirm the correct item is used.

-Use of colored tags, papers and containers in production as an addition visual check to ensure intermediate components are not interchanged.

-Designated areas for flour and nonfat dry milk use to control airborne allergens and minimize spread.

-Bar code readers at packaging lines to ensure correct package is used with each product.

-Analysis for gluten in our in-house allergen lab:Each manufacturing run of a Gluten Free product is tested to ensure it complies with the FDA definition of Gluten Free (<20 ppm).

-Potentially problematic ingredients are screened in

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If you are concerned about a specific batch, that it might have been contaminated or something? Amy's is actually pretty good about checking it for you. A couple years back I called the company up after my daughter had reacted to their food (turned out to be a different allergen, that time), gave them the batch number, and they had that batch tested at the lab to double check gluten content. They keep some of each batch, I'm told.

I even got mailed the test results a few weeks later.

I don't know that this is still something they will do, but they were very nice about it at the time, at least.

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I have had difficulty with Amy's products, especially the burritos. I couldn't understand why, until I read the "processed in a facility with wheat..." statement hidden in the seam of the package. My symptoms were bumps on my scalp. I find that I get DH-type flares on my head when I don't get strong GI symptoms.

I wrote the company, and I got the usual "we test our products and meet the FDA threshold for calling our products gluten-free" blah blah blah

I know what I know when I eat something. It doesn't happen every time I eat a burrito, but it's happened enough that I now just stay away from them completely.

After much trial and error, I've learned three major things: 1) I only eat certified gluten-free packaged foods. If it says "gluten-free,: but doesn't have the handy black and white gluten-free with a circle around it (In the US), I stay away and 2) I cannot tolerate gluten-free oats 3) I feel my best when the only things I eat are cooked from scratch at home.

Glad I am not alone with the Amy's products; my advice to others would be to stay away.

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After much trial and error, I've learned three major things: 1) I only eat certified gluten-free packaged foods. If it says "gluten-free,: but doesn't have the handy black and white gluten-free with a circle around it (In the US), I stay away and 2) I cannot tolerate gluten-free oats 3) I feel my best when the only things I eat are cooked from scratch at home.

Glad I am not alone with the Amy's products; my advice to others would be to stay away.

At this point, we're pretty much eating about that way, too. My kids were able to have Amy's for a year or two, but now we just stick to certified gluten-free foods too, but rarely even that because we make most things from scratch at home. I wonder if those of us with oat issues tend to drift that way? Hmmm...

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