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Bright Red Skin


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5 replies to this topic

#1 intolerant baker

 
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Posted 08 October 2012 - 03:37 PM

I have been diligently not eating gluten for about two months now, although I am sure I am getting glutened from my job. One thing I have been experiencing is patches of bright red skin that are sometimes raised and sometimes flat. It itches and burns something terrible, but I don't always get blisters with that particular rash. I get this rash a lot on my hands and arms, but also on the front of my knees and on my rear-end. Has anyone else had this reaction when not eating gluten, but still being exposed?
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#2 bartfull

 
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Posted 08 October 2012 - 04:10 PM

Erythroderma? Cherry angioma? Look them up on the internet and see if your symptoms match.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#3 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 08 October 2012 - 05:07 PM

intolerant baker, I went back & read your posts so I could see what your history was to better give you advice. I really hate saying this to you but others said it when you first posted on here ---- you are glutening yourself every day in your job. Wearing gloves is not enough. You are inhaling gluten every time you scratch bake which according to your posts is 2-3 times every day. I know the economy sucks right now & I understand you have health ins. in a job that rarely offers such but you are KILLING yourself a little bit every day. IMHO what you are experiencing is celiac rash trying to emerge. And it may not be long before you have a full fledged outbreak. You have GOT to either find a job in a gluten free restaurant or bakery or start your own business maybe out of your home baking gluten free goods for celiacs.
We don't always have to put gluten down our mouth for it to get into our stomach --- we can inhale gluten which goes down our throat into our stomach ESPECIALLY in a job like yours.
The dh rash presents in may ways & blisters is only one of those ways so just because you aren't getting blisters doesn't mean it isn't dh.

I know you don't want to hear this right now but I have to tell you the truth. You have the hallmarks of celiac disease. And believe me, you DON'T want to get to the stage where you DO get dh blisters!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Do you know all the horrible things untreated celiac disease can do to your body & mind? And you are untreated because you are getting glutened every day at work even though your actual diet is gluten free.

I'm not up on exactly what unemployment considers these days but you might check into that as you have to be in a gluten free cooking environment for your health. Your doctor can write a letter stating such. If you could get the unemployment while you look for a job at a gluten free place..... Are you in a big city? If so, you should be able to find a lovely niche in a gluten-free bakery or such.
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Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 


#4 intolerant baker

 
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Posted 08 October 2012 - 05:26 PM

Thank you both for your replies.
I do have to admit I am pretty certain it is a different manifestation of DH. I was diagnosed with a "gluten rash" (blisters and all) by my primary care doctor after I had removed gluten from my diet and re-introduced it. I did a six week gluten challenge and she did what I now know to be an incomplete celiac panel. The allergy tests to multiple foods were neg. as was the celiac work. Because I have wonky blood work ups, positive GI response to gluten-free diet, and multiple first degree relatives with auto-immune disorders I do consider myself to have unconfirmed celiac.
I am in the process of considering all options work wise. I have thought of going back to school for a nutrition degree, but the economy is where it's at right now and I am my family's only support at this point. I think for now I will also look into getting those masks folks wear to mow lawns...
Thanks again for your thoughtful responses. It still feels pretty overwhelming at times.
Jenn
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#5 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 08 October 2012 - 05:45 PM

Dear Jenn, I totally understand. And this sucks big time that it all comes down on you & affects your profession & then for you to be the sole breadwinner right now. Talk about one blow after another! You need some huge hugs! ((((JENN)))))

Okay, you need more than the mask those guys wear to mow lawns. You need one of those weird looking "breather" thingys to keep the flour particles out. AND you need to wear it all the time at work because gluten particles float around in the air for hours after making doughs etc....
Go to the hardware store & tell them you need like a painter's type breather mask.

If you get any lesions then you could go have them biopsied for dh. A dx of dh is a dx of celiac.
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Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 


#6 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 09 October 2012 - 04:21 AM

Even the respirator mask may not help. Your eyes will still be exposed and the dust will be getting into them. Plus those masks are quite heavy and uncomfortable and wearing one all day will be difficult. Your clothes and hair will also be getting coated so in the long run it is going to be hard not to get some degree of contamination.
You may be able to talk to your doctor, since he has recognized that this is a gluten related rash, and be able to get either unemployment or even temporary disability. You would be able to get student loans to supplement those payments to help the budget. There are also some professions where you can get paid while you train. Nurses Aide is the one that comes to mind. If that is a job that you can do you may want to check with your local hospital and see if there are any training opportunities in your locality. You could also check and see if there are any restaurants or other facilities that are hiring. Not all food establishments bake and you may be able to transition to a position in one where you won't be exposed to gluten all day. Many restaurants are also starting to cater to people on the gluten-free diet. You might be able to find some that will utilize your baking talents for the gluten free items they want on their menus.
You are in a tough position but you really need to find a job that will not kill you.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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