Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

New To Celiac Disease And Scared
0

18 posts in this topic

Hello I have been just diagnosed three days ago with Celiac Disease. All I can say is that I am scared and very confused. The information is very overwhelming and hard to understand. From what I have read here I have to go out and buy all new baking sheets and pots and utensils and etc. I cant afford this disease! :angry:

And the prices of the items that are gluten free are sometimes insane. I am so sick right now and just dont know what to do. I cant really even eat the gluten free stuff at this point. Does this get better :(

Thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Eat whole foods, avoid anything proccessed is one way to keep prices down.

Pots and pans, as long as they are not scratched should be fine.

Backing sheets can be covered with foil.

Colenders should be replaced, as should wooden spoons and plastic utenciles; stainless steal is fine.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does this get better :(

Yes. Absolutely.

Give yourself time. This is all very new to you. Shadow already answered a few of your concerns very well - ask as many questions as you need - you are not alone - we've all gone through the transition and are here to help.

Hang in there!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, it gets easier. Eating whole foods is a good way to start gluten-free. There are no labels to read and you know what you are eating. Try some corn tortillas instead of gluten-free bread. Most stores have their gluten-free items in the freezer section, altho Trader Joe's keeps some out on the bread shelf. Chex makes gluten-free cereals, and Betty Crocker has some gluten-free cake mixes that are not expensive

By the way, it was an emergency and I had to run the light! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Lisa said...give yourself some time. Take some time to educate yourself and read, read and read from this site. :)

But,the most important thing you need NOT to do is too get overwhelmed, as hard as it may be.

Begin you diet with "simple"...meats, fish, seafood, veggies, potatoes and rice - season with salt and pepper until you learn more. Water, tea(unflavored), Pepsi, Sprite and Coke are gluten free.

Stay away from processed gluten free foods. You won't like them, until you crave them a year later. :P The only thing I buy that is gluten free is an occasional bread product and pasta and waffles.

I guarantee you, that after some time, you will find that a gluten free life, is a FULL ONE. There is not too much that you will miss.

Welcome to the Club! :D

How can we held you replace some of your foods?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




The transition is overwhelming, but it can be done. Your body is working on recovery very hard. You may feel extra run down and even new symptoms. I always consider that any reaction is a good one. Do some studying, decide what to eat each meal, and get extra rest when you can.

Get well, Get well, ***** That is the best I can do for flowers.

Diana

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't buy many gluten Free products at all. I have a loaf of gluten-free white bread and a loaf of gluten-free Cinn Raisin bread in the freezer. Once in a while, I will buy a box of gluten-free cookies, or some gluten-free mix to make cookies for when I feel like having one. Once in a GREAT while, i will buy Udi's gluten-free Chocolate chip muffins but those are like 8 dollars for 4 so it is rare (they are SOOOO good though!)

I haven't bought new pots/pans, mostly because most of mine are stainless steel anyway. I have one teflon one that needs to be replaced because its all scratched up but I have been lazy, I just dont use that for my food.I have 2 colanders/strainers and honestly, just buy one at the dollar store or something, same for utensils, that's what I did.

I was really nervous at first about washing things. we dont have a dishwasher...if you search my posts you will see one from me a few months back panicking about how I was going to get everything clean, etc. Relax.

It does not have to be expensive. Just buy foods that don't have gluten in it. Rice..vegetables..meats, etc. Add in some "products" here and there if you want so you don't feel deprived. Gluten Free products are not a necessity, they are there so you don't feel like you lost something, imo.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all very much for your help...the whole pots and pan thing was really bothering me...what about coffee I have heard several different opinions about it? Gfindc...thanks for the moment of laughter :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as coffee is concerned, ive only heard that the flavored ones may have it. Always double check.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coffee is fine as Shadow said, as long as it's not flavored. You may want to drink it black for a while (it's better that way anyway, imo). Some of us have trouble with dairy at first, but even if dairy doesn't bother you, milk or cream in coffee might. It makes the coffee very acidic which might be rough on your damaged digestive system.

If you are a coffee fanatic like me, you might just want to get yourself some special coffee as a treat. Costa Rican beans perhaps (my favorite) or maybe even some Dunkin Dounuts Coffee. Seeing you can't have other treats you used to enjoy, a special cup of coffee might ease the sting a bit. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello I have been just diagnosed three days ago with Celiac Disease. All I can say is that I am scared and very confused. The information is very overwhelming and hard to understand. From what I have read here I have to go out and buy all new baking sheets and pots and utensils and etc. I cant afford this disease! :angry:

And the prices of the items that are gluten free are sometimes insane. I am so sick right now and just dont know what to do. I cant really even eat the gluten free stuff at this point. Does this get better :(

Thanks

I was dx in May and I completely understand your sentiment. It IS really overwhelming and scary at first, but I promise that it gets easier as time goes on. You do NOT have to go out and buy all new foods... you can still eat some processed foods too. You are going to have to spend a lot of time reading labels and making lists before going to grocery stores, but you will get the hang of it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When was the last time you came home from the grocery store with ONLY whole foods? It's actually cheaper than "the old" way of shopping. Cheaper by a LOT!

Go to the store & rediscover food! Go through the produce section & really look at all those fruits & veggies you have been whizzing past for years & years. Apples, pears, oranges, tangerines, avocados, mangos, pomegranates, plums, grapes & the list goes on. Snap beans, pole beans, chayote, winter squashes, summer squashes, cauliflower, leeks, tomatillos, tens of kinds of lettuce, fresh spinach, swiss chard, rhubarb, snow peas & on & on.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When was the last time you came home from the grocery store with ONLY whole foods? It's actually cheaper than "the old" way of shopping. Cheaper by a LOT!

Go to the store & rediscover food! Go through the produce section & really look at all those fruits & veggies you have been whizzing past for years & years. Apples, pears, oranges, tangerines, avocados, mangos, pomegranates, plums, grapes & the list goes on. Snap beans, pole beans, chayote, winter squashes, summer squashes, cauliflower, leeks, tomatillos, tens of kinds of lettuce, fresh spinach, swiss chard, rhubarb, snow peas & on & on.

Oh indeed, i can go spend about $60 and have more food then i did when i was on gluteny stuffs. So much easier.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Copgirl,

Here's some tips that might help. Starting out on the gluten-free diet can be upsetting, but there really are lots of foods to eat that don't have gluten in them. After a while eating whole foods you may find your tastes for things has changed and you are as interested in processed foods anymore. While you are healing your digestion can be kind of crazy and unpredictable. There lots of changes going on as you heal, including changes in the bacteria that inhabit your gut. Probiotics can help stabilize that change. Limiting sugar and starchy foods can ease the gas as those things feed the bacteria and cause gas.

It's good to do your own cooking whenever possible and make extra so you can freeze some. Rice is good but quinoa and teff and amaranth and buckwheat are also good alternative grain like foods you can use. They have more nutritional value than rice. Make sure to wash quinoa (or all of these really) well before cooking tho.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take gluten-free vitamins.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you again for the advice. The only things Im having problems with is hamburgers and pizza which I dont eat much of but do so much love. I know I can eat a hamburger without a bun but its just not the same thing ya know. And also its football time and we are a football family...how can I have a beer with the rest of our gang :angry:. I realize its for my health but its still upsetting sometimes. Not a very good person who does as she is told :P

Laura

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hamburgers - we use Udi's hamburger buns or the two end's of normal udi's bread. We take them with us if we will be grabbing a burger on the road.

Pizza - you can make your own - not the same convenience as take out, but does satisfy the craving very nicely without making you ill.

Beer - there are more and more gluten-free beers everyday. Use the search feature at the top right of your page to find numerous threads regarding options and opinions on their taste.

There is nothing that helps the frustration caused by removing spontaneity from our dining choices - except being prepared and giving it time. Even this gets much better with time.

Hang in there - it does get better :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 months into being gluten and dairy free and I still get angry at times. It does get easier though.

To keep costs down, shop the perimeter of the grocery store. Try to stay away from the processed foods. I will admit that it is sometimes easier said than done. I spend a lot of time in the kitchen, which also drives me nuts at times.

Once you're feeling a little adventurous try baking your own gluten free hamburger buns and breads. For now, concentrate on learning as much as you can and feeling better.

Great big {{{{{HUGS}}}}}}} to you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my experience, at least with the brands I have tried so far, when it comes to gluten-free rolls and breads, you need to toast or grill them really well. Maybe I just haven't gotten used to the texture, but thats what I need to do.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,118
    • Total Posts
      919,458
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Good luck with all the testing.  You are doing the right thing by telling your son to gluten up!  Buy him one of those gluteny cakes at a bakery...if that doesn't spike his numbers, nothing will. 
    • Thank you for this response! You are right, I'm sure. My sed rate was normal. My c reactive protein was 6, which is high. My platelets were a bit elevated and I was slightly anemic. I am going tomorrow for another endoscopy. I know that these things could be related to other things... but I'm thinking there is a change they are all still related to celiac (I'm hoping). What other autoimmune disease do you have, if you don't mind me asking?
    • HIV doesn't turn off the immune system, it destroys it to the point where most people die from complications that arise from having no immune system.  Some end up with pneumonia or cancer, which takes their life. It is pretty amazing the treatments they have developed for it, to slow it down and give people longer, quality time. I am perfectly content with the gluten free diet as my treatment and honestly, if they developed a pill that they claimed would make it possible for people to eat gluten again, I doubt I would. I could not bring myself to eat a food that I am genetically programmed to not be able to digest and that totally pisses off my immune system.  However, if they succeed with some of the meds they are working on now, one of which I posted about earlier this summer, I would take those.  They are working on things that modulate the immune system down so inflammation can be tamed down further.  Even with a strict gluten-free diet, there will always be more inflammation for us than for those who don't have AI diseases.  I do everything possible to tame it down myself but it isn't in the normal range.....yet. Long term inflammation can kill you so something along those lines would be welcome.  You would still have to eat gluten-free but the disease activity would be calmed down.  This is a drug that targets those with lupus and maybe Sjogren's....which I have.  There are possibilities for other AI diseases from that!
    • Hi Anns and welcome   Do you think that I am on the right course to see if I possibly have Celiac?   Yes, it was smart of you to consider the possibility and its good that you've had the tests. Both the aneamia and bloating are symptoms, although of course they may be unrelated. Best way to find out is to check as you are doing.   Can this develope later in life ( I'm 46)?   Yes, I think its most common discovered later rather than sooner.   I ate a meal last night that was gluten free and did not feel like nearly as bloated after eating, would I notice a change that quickly?  Thanksort for your input.   Yes, I noticed far less of a heavy feeling after eating very soon after diet changes. However you would be better off not trying gluten free just yet. I collected some links and other stuff here, it may be of use: Your best bet is to eat as normal and wait for the test results. If your doctors eliminate celiac there's nothing to stop you excluding gluten at that point to see if it helps. But before then you need to keep eating it to ensure an accurate diagnosis.  All the best  
    • Well HIV undermines the entire immune system as I understand it, so that would be akin to using dynamite to put out a kitchen fire! There is some work going on to try and retrain the immune system to not see gluten as a threat though: http://www.immusant.com/docs/ImmusanT DDW Data Release FINAL 5.24.16.pdf  I'm laughing as I write this imagining the conversations you could have with people as you tell them you'd like to contract HIV so that you can eat a decent sandwich        
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,159
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Anns
    Joined