Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Behavior Is The Biggest Manifestation Of My Disease: Anxiety, Trichotillomania, Collecting/hoarding
0

2 posts in this topic

I just want to put this out here for other people who may be struggling with these issues: You are not alone.

I have been a hair-puller (trichotillomania) for all my adult life. I get intense itching and feel that the only relief I can find is to remove the hair at the source of itching. When I first went gluten-free, I noticed that the intensity of the itching and the urge to pull went away. Then I learned about DH. When I'm accidentally glutened, the bumps on my head come back, and the urge to scratch/itch/pull is uncontrollable. I don't get any relief, and by the time I'm done ravaging my hair, I've got a bald spot.

Glutening also makes me a demon-possessed acquirer of things. I will go on shopping binges. It doesn't matter what it is...shoes, scarves, pens, whatever comes up as a need at the moment turns into a day-long mission to find as many of that thing as I can come up with. A couple days later, I look back, and I'm like "what was I thinking?" When I don't have gluten, I'm fine, and can easily use "executive decision making" to determine what is really needed and what is not.

My dad, who also had undiagnosed celiac disease, was the same way. When he died, and we cleaned out his drawers of things, we found collections of watches, pens, eraser refills, tie tacks...You name it...there wasn't just one, two, or three of things...but dozens. And we also heard that his brother did the same thing, but his penchant was for coffee. He had chest freezers full of coffee imported from Costa Rica.

My anxiety levels pre-diagnosis of gluten sensitivity were off the charts. I would stress at everything, My heart rate would accelerate to 180bpm for no apparent reason. I was diagnosed with dysautonomia, but Ativan would bring my heart rate down and my thinking more clear. I had an overwhelming sense of dread at everything.

Depression? Don't even get me started...No amount of Lexapro or Amitriptyline could lift me up....

Migraines were the worst. It was as if my brain was dying one quadrant at a time. The fact that low cerebellar volume has been associated with celiac disease is not surprising to me. I can actually feel my brain being killed when I'm glutened.

I would get dizzy, unable to walk a straight line.

Fibromyalgia? Intense. Everything hurt. All the time.

After being 6 months gluten-free, I am a new person. I can exercise again. I don't go in the the blank stare/anti-able-to-concentrate state. But even the slightest amount of cross-contamination sends me into hell. Bumps on my head, a feeling of worthlessness and hopelessness, I start packing things away like a squirrel saves nuts, I can't focus, and I get migraine more intensely than I have before.

I don't think there is enough research being done on the neurological impacts of gluten. I believe in my heart of hearts that the damage is just as severe, if not worse, than damage done to the gut in celiacs. I am convinced that so many of the behavioral problems we see in society today are gluten-related. ADHD, autism, insatiable appetite (hence obesity), OCD, chronic pain, Alzheimer's etc etc....

So if you are suffering, know that you are not alone. Stay away from gluten, eat lots of green leafy veg, fruits, and you will be fine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

The Costa Rican coffee, I can understand. It is SOOOOO GOOOOOOOOD! :)

I have noticed with myself that when I get glutened I get REALLY grumpy. I don't think the grumps are because I don't feel good either. A lot of times I just get a minor psoriasis outbreak which isn't that bad. But oh, you don't want to be around me then. If I drop something on the floor, instead of "Oops" and picking it up, I am more likely to use some of those words that always help mechanics when they are working on a car, while I kick the item across the floor. When I'm behind the wheel I am likely to be screaming, "Get out of my WAY!" at the driver in front of me. And when the neighbor's dog is barking incessantly, rather than saying, "Knock it off" I am more likely to point my finger at it and say, "DIE!"

I can't stand being around MYSELF when I'm like that, but I am helpless to stop it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,147
    • Total Posts
      919,590
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi Sarah, I agree with cyclinglady, your doctor doesn't seem to understand celiac disease.   Maybe you can check on Google for a local celiac support group.  Ask them if they know of any good celiac doctors in your area. The usual testing process for celiac is 12 weeks of eating gluten and then a blood test followed by an endoscopy later.  You are right, if you weren't eating gluten before the test it was not reliable. Welcome to the forum!  
    • Hi lolobaggins, Yes, it is not unusual to have symptoms that come and go after going gluten-free.  Edema (swelling) can also be a symptom of an allergic reaction.  Fatigue is not fun but remember your body is trying to heal a major organ, your gut.  So some rest might be a good idea.  The immune system response is going to keep going for several weeks to several months.  Each little bit of gluten kicks the immune response off again and extends the healing time.  So it's helpful to be very careful with your diet. Meats, vegetable, and nuts are good foods to eat at the beginning.  And whole foods rather than processed foods.  Dairy is often a problem until the villi are healed.  After a few weeks if things are going well you can try to add one new food a week and see how things go.  But take it slow and easy.  The fewer foods/ingredients we are eating the easier it is to identify problem foods. Welcome to the forum!
    • Welcome to the club that you never wanted to join!  (I plagiarized that from someone else here but can't recall who so I can't give credit to them.) Anyway, there is a steep learning curve to being gluten free.  It takes time to learn to read labels.  It takes time to heal (like months to YEARS).  Symptoms can wax or wane.  You just have to keep moving forward.  Give yourself time to heal and do not worry about the gym right now.  It will come back later, I promise (from a gal who cycles, swims, and runs).   Read our Newbie 101 section pinned at the top of the "Coping" section.  It contains valuable tips about cross contamination and hidden sources of gluten.  Read, read, read, the internet from reliable sources (not crazy bloggers).   You will feel better soon.  
    • Ha!    That happens to me all the time!!!!!  It drives me crazy!
    • "Accidentally marked them soy free".  Are you kidding?  That's fraud!  Consumer Reports just issued a huge report this month on supplements.   Yes, everyone thinks they are all "natural" and therefore safe.  Doctors and nurses recommend them all the time, but they can do a lot of damage.  Anyone can start making them in their bathroom and there's literally no regulation.   Geez, it is safer to buy food products (no gluten ingredients listed) from companies like Kraft and ConAgra because they are regulated more!  http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2016/09/index.htm What about the probiotics?  Columbia University tested about 20 of them and found that over half had gluten in them.....enough to make celiacs  remain sick. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150515083232.htm Think twice about taking supplements.  Make sure you really medically need supplements.  I prefer certified gluten-free if I need to take them and I take nothing right now because all my labs are okay!  You have been on the gluten-free bandwagon for many years (member here for years).  Your doctors should be looking at other things that might be making you sick still.  Something is wrong!   That's my two cents!    
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,181
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Diana061
    Joined