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Bread Makers - Coupla' Questions


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6 replies to this topic

#1 zamm0

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 12:54 AM

Hello people, rookie Celiac here with two questions:

1. Having bought a brand new toaster (as per recommendation), do I need to buy a new bread maker? We have an old break maker that was used pre diagnosis (i.e. to make bread WITH gluten) a few times....can I use that one?

2. Do I need a break maker with a "gluten-free" setting on it?

Many thanks,

Paul.
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#2 AMcKeller

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 02:16 AM

Hello people, rookie Celiac here with two questions:

1. Having bought a brand new toaster (as per recommendation), do I need to buy a new bread maker? We have an old break maker that was used pre diagnosis (i.e. to make bread WITH gluten) a few times....can I use that one?

2. Do I need a break maker with a "gluten-free" setting on it?

Many thanks,

Paul.


Hi, Paul!

Great that you bought a new toaster. Impossible to get those things free of gluten after years of use, I think. My personal opinion is that you should also buy a new bread machine. Even though I wash everything carefully by hand, I still notice that I sometimes miss a speck here and there. I never really scratched mine or anything, so I don't think gluten could get stuck that way, but I don't know what you do with your bread machine. :P

I don't think there is a gluten free setting on bread machines and if there is, I've yet to see one. That said, there are bread machine mixes you can buy, and there are gluten-free bread machine bread recipes online that can guide you in the beginning.

Personally, I hate gums (no glue in my food, please. lol). I suggest experimenting with ground chia seeds soaked in boiling water (equal to measurement of gum). It gives you a gooey, almost egg-like consistency.

Hope that helps!
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#3 shadowicewolf

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 04:35 AM

Eh, can you get a new canaster for it? If not, yes you should, especially if it has scratches.
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#4 GottaSki

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 09:40 AM

Hello people, rookie Celiac here with two questions:

1. Having bought a brand new toaster (as per recommendation), do I need to buy a new bread maker? We have an old break maker that was used pre diagnosis (i.e. to make bread WITH gluten) a few times....can I use that one?

2. Do I need a break maker with a "gluten-free" setting on it?

Many thanks,

Paul.


Welcome Paul!

I had a bread maker that made one or two loaves of glutenous bread and was then relegated to a very dark corner of our storage room for years. I cleaned it and washed the bread pan - both by hand and ran through dishwasher. We never had a problem with it and have made many loaves of gluten-free bread. If you do clean it - pay careful attention to the swirly mechanism at the bottom of the pan - mine had a few crumbs trapped there.

If you decide on a new maker - a gluten-free setting sounds like a great idea - not sure what it does for you, but gluten-free flours do behave a bit differently so I'd opt for that setting if choosing between models with or w/out the gluten-free setting.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#5 zamm0

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 09:43 AM

OK thanks for the replies I'm going to try my luck with the existing one following a thorough, thorough clean. I'll update the thread as to my findings in due course....
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#6 mamaw

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 11:54 AM

there are several bread makers with gluten-free settings now on the market.....Plus Bready makes one for their specific mixes....I found where the little mixers insert is it is impossible to get all the debrie out of...but if your not a extremely sensitive celiac it may be okay for you to use the one you have....For sensitive people I don't think it is worth the risk of getting sick over...

Kinda like playing Russian Roulette !
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#7 SensitiveMe

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 08:54 AM

A glutenfree setting is preferrable because glutenfree bread needs only one knead and one rise cycle. I continued to use my previous breadmaker (a Zojirushi which is expensive) and cleaned it thoroughly using a brush to clean the posts and paddles of the pan.

Initially I used the regular bread cycle to make glutenfree bread until I became more experienced and familiar with glutenfree baking. My machine doesn't have a glutenfree setting but it is programmable so I now program in the knead, rise and bake cycles myself and it has made the bread so much better. The regular setting has too many knead and rise cycles and so the bread will end up collapsing a bit and will be tougher and more crumbly.

Bread machines are not very forgiving and if you are making a yeast glutenfree bread I do not suggest you experiment without using gums. Gums are needed for structure. I once attempted using chia seeds instead and spent the rest of the evening cleaning out the absolute mess it made in my machine. And the bread had to be thrown away...it had risen up so high there was dough all over the top and sides of the machine, then when it baked it collapsed and the middle was as flat as a pancake.

It helps if you can keep an eye on the bread machine and stir down the dry ingredients on the sides with a spatula when it goes into knead cycle. Glutenfree flour mixes are harder to stir in and some machines need a little help. It is best to have a machine with 2 paddles in the pan. And try to take the bread out right away after it is done...remove it from the pan onto a wire rack for cooling so it won't get gummy.

Good luck and hope you will be back to let us know how the bread turned out.
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