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Thanksgiving Ideas...


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67 replies to this topic

#16 celiac-mommy

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:45 AM

What bread do you use?


I make 2 loaves of Pamela's
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Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)


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#17 sa1937

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:45 AM

Yes FREE is good! And you might also want to check out Living Without. Lots of recipes. Some articles are restricted to subscribers only and others can be read by everyone.

Jules Shepard also freely shares recipes on her blog: http://blog.julesglutenfree.com/
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Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#18 sa1937

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:47 AM

I make stuffing from Ener-G rice bread. Only thing it's good for, in my opinion. No matter what you do to that bread, it doesn't lose it's shape. So you can dice it into tiny pieces, toast them, and them mix it into stuffing w/ veggies and broth. And you can do the thing where you add broth, bake, stir, more broth, bake, stir. Can do it five times and bread cubes don't lose their shape. Kinda sketchy, now I think about it....

I think you could run over it with a truck and it would still be intact. Posted Image
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#19 JNBunnie1

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:16 AM

We considered using it to patch drywall at one point....
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If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#20 lovegrov

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:25 AM

Some might see this as heresy, but I can understand somebody not wanting to change their stuffing/dressing recipe to gluten free. IMO, it doesn't taste the same and if you have a recipe that everybody already likes, different is not necessarily good. Thanksgiving food is comfort food. Several years ago I tried making the oyster stuffing recipe I loved with gluten-free bread and YUCK! Bread has improved and my tastebuds have changed, so I might try it again.

richard
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#21 ndw3363

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:49 AM

I use gluten-free bread and vegetable broth bc I'm a vegetarian, but this is by far the best stuffing I've ever had. Have made it gluten-free for the past 6 years and it's loved my all!

http://allrecipes.co...=1&e7=Home Page


That's the same recipe I used two years ago! How funny - I'm planning on doing it again only this time with gluten-free bread. Ok, now I want turkey and stuffing.
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#22 bartfull

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:59 AM

Lst year I attended the community Thanksgiving dinner our American Legion puts on every year. Everything is homemade from scratch and it is all SO GOOD! All of my friends go there now too. Of course I brought all of my own sides, but I did risk the turkey, which wasn't stuffed. Bad mistake. I think the turkey was injected with something that had corn in it. Or maybe it was CC, I don't know.

But I enjoy spending the time with my friends, so this year I am just bringing ALL of my own food. And now that I can eat Udi's again, I can even make my own stuffing. :)
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#23 Adalaide

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 11:42 AM

This will be my first gluten free Thanksgiving. I've gotten accustomed to the way my husband's family is not nearly as family oriented as mine is around holidays. Anyway, I'm the only person in the family willing (or apparently knowledgeable or capable) of cooking for an army of people. I grew up helping my grammy prepare holiday meals for about 22, that number exceeds 30 now most holidays, but anyway, I can cook. I think I can handle 7. His family is always astounded by my spread of turkey or ham, stuffing, vegetables, desserts, homemade pickles, deviled eggs, etc etc etc.

This year I'll keep it simple. Turkey, probably a cornbread stuffing, my oh-so-amazing, you'll think you died and went to heaven gravy, enough mashed potatoes to choke a donkey and some candied carrots or yams or something. And of course a crustless pumpkin pie and cheesecake. I don't really need both but I can't think of one good reason not to make both.

Honestly, other than the stuffing and the fact that I'll use cornstarch instead of flour to thicken my gravy I can't think of anything I'll change to make my Thanksgiving gluten free. Crustless pies, but who needs crust! It just gets in the way of what we're really after anyway.
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#24 kareng

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 11:46 AM

And of course a crustless pumpkin pie and cheesecake. I don't really need both but I can't think of one good reason not to make both.


7 people need more than 1 pie so, of course yo need a second dessert! ;)
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
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#25 bartfull

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 11:48 AM

Can you send me some of that gravy? :lol:

My Mom made the best gravy in the world, and even though (I think) I do it just like she did, mine always comes out flavorless. All you can taste in mine is the cornstarch. (YUCK!) I have tried everything! Someone said I need to "cook" the drippings longer. I did and it didn't work. Some have told me to use bullion cubes, but Mom never did. One time I cooked the heck out of the giblets and added that broth to the drippings. It STILL tasted like corn starch. WHAT am I doing WRONG???
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#26 Adalaide

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 12:00 PM

Two things make amazing gravy. First, you have to start with good drippings from meat that was well seasoned. Check? Okey dokey. Throw it all in a pan and turn it up nice and high so it gets to a rolling boil. Taste. Is it good and salty? No. Add salt, liberally. You're already making gravy, this is not the time to be worried about your ticker. Taste and taste again until it's just like you want your gravy to taste.

Oh, did I mention you shouldn't start this process if you don't already have your cornstarch/water mix ready? I go with a liberal 2 tablespoons of cornstarch and just enough water to make it soupy. Then pour slowly while whisking, just a little dribble at a time. You will almost never need it all, and letting it cook for 30 seconds after you add an entire teaspoon full of thickener lets it cook out some of that starchy flavor, gives it more time to thicken up with what you added and keeps you from adding too much.

If I use flour, I put it in a shaker cup, about 1/2 cup to a cup of water and just pour slowly in a drizzle the same way only with out stopping so often. I know some people can't do corn. I just find it cheaper and easier cleanup than flour shaker cups.

In the end, there is nothing inherently wrong with keeping emergency supplies of canned gravy. Or, I keep Kirkland chicken stock on hand which makes amazing gravy with just a little salt added. There is nothing like bad gravy to ruin Thanksgiving and better canned than nothing!
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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#27 Adalaide

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 12:02 PM

Also, mailing gravy will probably be a little messy. You can just come over for Thanksgiving. The more the merrier. :D
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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#28 kareng

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 12:25 PM

Can you send me some of that gravy? :lol:

My Mom made the best gravy in the world, and even though (I think) I do it just like she did, mine always comes out flavorless. All you can taste in mine is the cornstarch. (YUCK!) I have tried everything! Someone said I need to "cook" the drippings longer. I did and it didn't work. Some have told me to use bullion cubes, but Mom never did. One time I cooked the heck out of the giblets and added that broth to the drippings. It STILL tasted like corn starch. WHAT am I doing WRONG???



Have you tried rice flour or potato starch? Might taste less corny.

Really. It would be easier if we all just went to Ad's house for dinner. :D
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


#29 shadowicewolf

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 12:27 PM

O.o did you not season the gravy enough? I can't taste cornstarch at all when i make it.

I'm blaming you guys for me wanting a cornish hen. I might make one for thanksgiving in the roticery (only ever been used for chicken and beef, thus gluten free XD).
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#30 bartfull

 
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Posted 16 October 2012 - 12:27 PM

OK. A lot of times there really aren't a lot of drippings in the pan when I am cooking small meals for myself. Can I just add water and scrape up the crusty bits, then cook 'em? When I make pork chops or even chicken breasts, I usually only cook two at a time and there just isn't much left in the pan. I don't usually season either of those things, although I used to season the gravy itself with sage and the like. Should I add butter to the meat while cooking to get more drippings?

I used to use Heinz gravy in the jar but with all of my crazy intolerances I'm afraid to try anything like that now.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 





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