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And So It Begins


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25 replies to this topic

#16 KikiB

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 09:36 AM

I can do eggs for breakfast. Honestly, some of it as the convenience piece and the doctor saying it was safe. I think these first two weeks have been desperate for all things safe. Because of the fatigue, I've been getting up for work later than normal, so I often take dry cereal in the car while I'm driving.



I make scrambled eggs in the microwave at work when I get in. First melt butter into a bowl. Then add two eggs, mixed. Cook on high for 30 seconds. Stir well, cook for another 30 seconds. They come out very fluffy.
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#17 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:01 AM

Right now, I'm eating rice chex with rice milk for breakfast. I usually have a mid morning snack of veggies or a piece of fruit with a slice of cheese (which I guess I have to give up now that he added the no-dairy piece). For lunch, I try to eat the leftovers from the dinner the night before. Steak or porkchop with veggies and applesauce or beans and rice or veggie stir fry (in fresh ginger and garlic). For dinner, I eat the same kinds of things. Thinking about trying quinoa again, but my doctor warned that cross contamination is an issue and that a lot of people with gluten issues find it acts the same way as gluten.

For snacks, I'll do a rice cake with homemade black bean dip, fruits and veggies.

My doctor is a GI doctor. I told him that, after a positive blood test, I'd try the diet. I don't have good insurance, so doing the endoscopy and biopsy would cost me a small fortune. He's known in the area for doing really good work.

My understanding is that the soy, nuts, and other restrictions contribute to the thyroid issues. Good heavens, I think that's what I remember reading. I know that my thyroid is functioning normally, but the gluten is preventing me from receiving the benefits.



LadyCeliac.....I also have Hashi's and Celiac and the information your doctor gave you about cutting so many foods out because of your thyroid issues is horse-pucky! Sorry to say so but he is starving you to death for no good reason. If you have been diagnosed with Hashi's, it is because of the Celiac and not what you eating, as far as the other foods are concerned.

My thyroid antibodies were through the roof, 1200 to be exact, and I brought them down to the normal range by following a strict gluten-free diet and going dairy lite. I can tolerate a small amount of dairy but not large hits, like milk. Many Celiacs have a problem with dairy but that doesn't mean you cannot have it yourself. Do not cut out so many foods all at once as you'll never figure out what ones do bother you. If you do have Hashi's, that will require life long thyroid hormone replacement...food is not going to cure Hashi's.

I would seriously consider a new doctor. If you have any specific questions, ask away! We are here to help.
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#18 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:14 AM

Yes, I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto Thyroiditis. He isn't putting me on synthroid because he said my thyroid is actually functioning fine, I'm just not getting the benefit because the gluten is clogging it up.


This is so ridiculous, it's scary to think he is practicing medicine. :o

At the time of my diagnosis, they took 16 vials of blood and tested for EVERYTHING, including heavy metals. I did have elevations of Copper and Selenium. My thyroid panels came back within range, but he feels gluten is blocking me from getting it.



How did he diagnose you with Hashi's if your panel came back within range? That makes no sense to me. :huh:

I'm on a daily regimen of Vitamin D, daily vitamin, Calcium/Magnesium, Fish oil, B Complex time release and cinnamon bark--taking supplements 4x day.

My doctor will recheck all blood work in 2 months after I get the known gluten sources out and have had time for supplements to work.


Two months is not nearly enough time to start to recover from Celiac and possible Hashi's...which will not get better on it's own. You need to be taking thyroid replacement hormone for this. Most people have repeat testing for Celiac after 1 year...no sooner than 6 months.

I've noticed I'm lethargic through the day and can't sleep at night. Prior to diagnosis, I just felt tired all the time.

My doctor doesn't want me doing buckwheat, amaranth, or sorghums as he feels they can act like gluten and cause problems. Yeah...I know...the list dwindles as to what I can eat.


Again, I urge you to find someone else to see because his information is flat out incorrect. Fatigue can be caused by either Celiac, Hashi's or both. It takes a long time to recover from either and I don't think that's going to happen for you, judging by what this doctor is doing. You won't be eating enough to recover well. I'm sure he sold you all those supplements? <_<
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#19 LadyCeliac

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:20 AM

I'm honestly very confused about the Hashimoto's and how he concluded it. I know my Thyroid panels were within normal range. My internal medicine doctor had done the panel 3x/4yrs because of my symptoms and was fairly surprised when all the results always came in right in the middle of the road...not even on a high or low end of normal.

The doctor emailed me over the weekend when I asked about synthroid and just insisted that my thyroid was working fine, but blocked by gluten.

I just looked at all my results and here is what it said:
  • T4 TOTAL THYROXIN: 12.7 (H)
  • T3 TOTAL (TRIIODGHYRONINE): 1.94 (H)

So, I'm really confused.
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#20 tom

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:29 AM

...
Do not cut out so many foods all at once as you'll never figure out what ones do bother you.
...

That sounds backwards to me.
Cutting out enough to find what *doesn't* bother you, what you can safely eat every day is very important imho.

Then you figure out which bother you by adding one at a time.
Subtracting one at a time to figure out what bothers you can not only take far longer, but can also too easily lead to false conclusions based on non-causal correlations.
(e.g. I felt much better on Sunday & haven't had cauliflower for 3 days)

It may not be enjoyable, but starting w/ a very limited diet & keeping a food/symptom journal can be extremely & irreplaceably valuable.
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
Dairy-free since 10-04
Soy-free since 5-07

#21 LadyCeliac

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:52 AM

Then you figure out which bother you by adding one at a time.
Subtracting one at a time to figure out what bothers you can not only take far longer, but can also too easily lead to false conclusions based on non-causal correlations.
(e.g. I felt much better on Sunday & haven't had cauliflower for 3 days)



Tom, you worded my doctor's objective well. Far better than what I was doing. I think he believes corn & oats very well may be able to go back into my diet as well as dairy, but is wanting to get my gut healed up before introducing potentially reactive things.
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#22 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:52 AM

That sounds backwards to me.
Cutting out enough to find what *doesn't* bother you, what you can safely eat every day is very important imho.

Then you figure out which bother you by adding one at a time.
Subtracting one at a time to figure out what bothers you can not only take far longer, but can also too easily lead to false conclusions based on non-causal correlations.
(e.g. I felt much better on Sunday & haven't had cauliflower for 3 days)

It may not be enjoyable, but starting w/ a very limited diet & keeping a food/symptom journal can be extremely & irreplaceably valuable.


Ah...the ever questioning Tom!!

Food allergies and intolerances can be figured a couple of different ways. You can either eat spartan and add foods back in or
if you have been diagnosed with Celiac or another major allergy, cut that out and see how you feel. Many, many people do fine that way and discover they have no additional problems. That way, you are not deprived of too many nutrients that you may not be allergic to. Why would anyone cut out food that may not be causing a problem and limit your diet when you are trying to heal from Celiac Disease? This doctor has her cutting out many foods that are nutritionally dense and are not going to be a problem for the thyroid issue she may not have. When a person is malnourished, it is quite stupid to ask them to cut out major food groups that offer sound nutrition.

I felt fine after going gluten-free for 2 years....in fact,it was the best I ever felt in my whole life. Then, I noticed problems and cut dairy out, because that's the next logical step for a Celiac. It was the dairy and 7 1/2 years later, dairy is still a problem. As long as I don't ingest a big hit of dairy, I feel great. And we all know that those who are reacting to many foods may be in the process of healing and will react for awhile OR, they have multiple food intolerances....then the food journal can be useful. Why make things harder than they have to be? You are free to figure things out whatever way you want but it is not always necessary to go spartan to figure out a problem.
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#23 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:57 AM

I'm honestly very confused about the Hashimoto's and how he concluded it. I know my Thyroid panels were within normal range. My internal medicine doctor had done the panel 3x/4yrs because of my symptoms and was fairly surprised when all the results always came in right in the middle of the road...not even on a high or low end of normal.

The doctor emailed me over the weekend when I asked about synthroid and just insisted that my thyroid was working fine, but blocked by gluten.

I just looked at all my results and here is what it said:

  • T4 TOTAL THYROXIN: 12.7 (H)
  • T3 TOTAL (TRIIODGHYRONINE): 1.94 (H)

So, I'm really confused.


Can you post the reference ranges for your thyroid testing from the lab report? Plus, all the thyroid tests they performed?
That would be extremely helpful!

Yes, this can all be so confusing but there are many thyroid veterans on here who can be of great help. I have been treating Hashi's for 20 years so know a bit about that. Gluten will definitely aggravate an autoimmune thyroid problem but it would show in your numbers. You also have to do the thyroid antibody testing, usually included in a full panel, to diagnose Hashi's.
Please post whatever you can and we will try to figure this out!
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#24 LadyCeliac

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 11:09 AM

Can you post the reference ranges for your thyroid testing from the lab report? Plus, all the thyroid tests they performed?
That would be extremely helpful!

Yes, this can all be so confusing but there are many thyroid veterans on here who can be of great help. I have been treating Hashi's for 20 years so know a bit about that. Gluten will definitely aggravate an autoimmune thyroid problem but it would show in your numbers. You also have to do the thyroid antibody testing, usually included in a full panel, to diagnose Hashi's.
Please post whatever you can and we will try to figure this out!



Here are my thyroid tests and results:

T4 TOTAL THYROXIN: 12.7 (H)
T UPTAKE: 0.75
FREE THYROXIN INDEX: 9.5
TSH, HIGH-SENSITIVITY: 2.978
T4 FREE: 1.31
T3 TOTAL (TRIIODGHYRONINE): 1.94 (H)
MICROSOMAL AB (ANTI-TPO AB): 18.3


I'm not sure what they all mean :(
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#25 GottaSki

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 11:27 AM

I happen to agree with both Gemini and Tom!

Giving the removal of gluten an opportunity to remedy all symptoms associated with Celiac Disease for several months makes sense and will likely reduce stress in an already stressful time.

After several months if symptoms are not improving I believe removing most possible intolerances and then adding them back in singularly is the best way to determine intolerance and this is why:

Upon removing gluten I had improvement in digestive symptoms over the first months, but all other symptoms - fatigue, pain, brain fog and many, many more become much worse. I kept a detailed food log for well over a year while I tried removing both individual foods and groups of foods with very few definitive reactions over that time. When I finally reduced my foods to very basic meat, selected vegies and fruits I was finally able to determine very clear reactions as I trialed each food item individually.

Do I recommend removing so many foods when first diagnosed with Celiac Disease - NO. I believe strongly that the newly diagnosed should remove gluten first and possible dairy if it is an obvious problem as is the case with many celiacs. If symptoms don't improve or worsen I think going the strictest route of elimination diets is very helpful in determining the problem foods and is far less frustrating than trying to remove a single food item or group at a time. My hindsight wishes I would have known to try a full elimination diet far earlier than at two years gluten-free.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#26 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 11:48 AM

Here are my thyroid tests and results:

T4 TOTAL THYROXIN: 12.7 (H)
T UPTAKE: 0.75
FREE THYROXIN INDEX: 9.5
TSH, HIGH-SENSITIVITY: 2.978
T4 FREE: 1.31
T3 TOTAL (TRIIODGHYRONINE): 1.94 (H)
MICROSOMAL AB (ANTI-TPO AB): 18.3


I'm not sure what they all mean :(



My goodness...you are fast!


If you look at the report, the lab should give a reference range also, stating what the normal range for each test should be. Can you find and post those? Every lab has different ranges so these are important to know.

Quickly looking at what you have posted, your TSH is on the higher side. Many docs will treat the thyroid with a TSH over 2.00. I am hypo-thyroid, with symptoms, at the TSH you tested at.
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