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Reading Labels


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#1 ramdr

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 08:19 AM

Other posts I've read have stated regulations for labeling on US products. I want to be sure I understand correctly. Does EVERY product sold in the US now have to say specifically,"contains wheat" if it does? I've noticed on some labels that after the list of ingredients there is a line that says "contains: eggs, milk, soy, wheat, peanuts", for instance. So whatdo I need to look out for? If wheat is not listed after "contains", do I just check for barley, rye, malt and oats, due to cross contamination?
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#2 psawyer

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 08:43 AM

FALCPA applies to most packaged food sold in the US. It requires clear disclosure of eight top allergens, one of which is wheat.

The law can be met either by listing wheat in the ingredients list, or by including a "contains" statement listing wheat. Many companies do both. But if there is no contains statement, you must still read the ingredients completely.

FALCPA does not apply to USDA regulated foods, but USDA regulations require disclosure of any grain added.
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Peter
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Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#3 Adalaide

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 09:26 AM

Keep in mind that this does not apply to barley, rye or oats. So even if the package has a "contains" statement and does not list wheat, you will still have to read the individual ingredients to rule out other sources of gluten.
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#4 ramdr

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 06:08 PM

FALCPA applies to most packaged food sold in the US. It requires clear disclosure of eight top allergens, one of which is wheat.

The law can be met either by listing wheat in the ingredients list, or by including a "contains" statement listing wheat. Many companies do both. But if there is no contains statement, you must still read the ingredients completely.

FALCPA does not apply to USDA regulated foods, but USDA regulations require disclosure of any grain added.

What USDA regulated foods might contain grain? Enhanced meat?
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#5 psawyer

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 06:21 PM

What USDA regulated foods might contain grain? Enhanced meat?

The USDA regulates meat and poultry. We hear stories here regularly about chicken or turkey being injected with broth, and allegations that the broth contains wheat. I have yet to see a proven case, but if any grain product (including, but not limited to, wheat) were added it would have to be disclosed.

The USDA also regulates eggs.
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Peter
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Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#6 ramdr

 
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Posted 24 October 2012 - 09:40 AM

The USDA regulates meat and poultry. We hear stories here regularly about chicken or turkey being injected with broth, and allegations that the broth contains wheat. I have yet to see a proven case, but if any grain product (including, but not limited to, wheat) were added it would have to be disclosed.

The USDA also regulates eggs.

Thanks for the replies. So I have to keep reading labels closely, but I now have a better idea of how to read themwell.
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