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Help Interpreting My Gene Test Please!
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First off, you cannot, absolutely cannot, test for a gluten sensativity like you can celiac. IF it has helped being off it, then stay off of it.

The results, to my understanding, looks okay to me (I could be wrong).

You also have one of the genes, which is interesting.

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I am a DQ2.2 and I have celiac, but is it considered a "rare celiac gene".

Some people without a DQ2 or DQ8 gene have celiac.

Some people with these so-called celiac genes --do NOT have celiac.

This is not a diagnostic tool, therefore. There are doctors who think that if you do not have a DQ2 or DQ8 gene, your risk of developing celiac is low or nil.

Yet, we see this is not true on here once and awhile.

My doc biopsied a guy with neither of these genes and his villi were totally flat.

If you feel better off gluten, then that is your answer.

Not everyone with gluten-related issues is a full-blown celiac, but they could very well be gluten intolerant and suffer horrid symptoms.

Read this:

http://www.livingwithout.com/issues/4_15/qa_augsep11-2554-1.html

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I should also note i have both genes. To my understanding those with both have a slightly higher risk.

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Thanks for the info, I know I shouldn't worry about the gene testing stuff but Im some one that likes facts and data! Also most of my symptoms were not so topical with the traditional Celiac. I had multipul protruding discs/ DDD, compression fracture at T7, leg pain/ joint pain, calf cramping/ heels spurs plantar fasciitis, costochondritis,right SI joint inflamation and pain, I was actual scheduled for and SI join fussion, boy I'm happy I didn't go thought with that. I could go on and on. Most of this started when I crash in a road race a few years ago, I injered my hip/ SI joint and the injections and radio frequency started and I feel apart, oh I almost forgot the best symptems daily migraines, fatigue and bran fog so bad I was getting lost while drive in the town I've lived in forever. After reading some other people's post here I have relized that maybe they are normal Celiac symptems!

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If I'm reading your report correctly, you have a single DQ2.2 - which as IH mentioned is a gene regarded at lower risk to develop Celiac Disease - note...lower risk, not without risk.

I find your numbers interesting as they are very close to my own kid's negative numbers - all of whom had celiac symptoms resolve after removing gluten. I have often wondered if having a Total IgA in the lower "normal" range may effect the number of antibodies detected in celiac blood tests.

While having "celiac genes" is considered common in those with diagnosed Celiac Disease, they are not required for the onset of Celiac Disease. IMO the data will be far more complete in analyzing risk once the number of folks that have gene testing is increased - as this test is not a necessary component of celiac diagnosis - I'd guess we are a long way off from increasing the data.

Here is one sampling regarding gene testing among diagnosed celiacs:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21292306

Bottom line - removing gluten has improved your health - stick with it :)

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Thanks gottaski! I'm glad you you kid has improved on the diet, I'm worried about my son, he has been complaining about his low black and leg cramps since he was 12. Thinking about changing his diet, but geting a 14 year old to buy into a gluten-free diet may be a problem. Anyhow that is the same age when my back problem began. Started going to to chiropractor on a regular basis when I was 12. Ive just had a hard time excepting this was all due to my diet. Almost to good to be true.

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Irishhart I read the article you put in your post, very intresting, thanks.

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I'm worried about my son, he has been complaining about his low black and leg cramps since he was 12. Thinking about changing his diet, but geting a 14 year old to buy into a gluten-free diet may be a problem. Anyhow that is the same age when my back problem began. Started going to to chiropractor on a regular basis when I was 12. Ive just had a hard time excepting this was all due to my diet. Almost to good to be true.

My youngest two sons were 13 and 15 when I was diagnosed. Each had completely different symptoms. We let them decide to go gluten-free for themselves - as it really wouldn't be possible to make teenagers stick with it unless it was their decision - IMHO.

The 15 year old decided first - his symptoms were GERD, along with recurring flu type symptoms - his growth rate also slowed, rather than increased during puberty. He was convinced after the first few accidental and intentional glutenings - his reactions became quite severe rather quickly gluten-free.

The 13 year old had achy joint issues from about age 7 or 8 - was screened regularly for AIs. He also vomited more than his share - without other digestive symptoms. Anyway our home slowly evolved from a combined to a gluten-free kitchen - as the gluten decreased he felt much better. Eventually we removed the last gluten containing items from the kitchen and his joint issues completely resolved. He is not careful about CC when out with friends (he's 17 now), but does order gluten-free.

Just be consistent with your diet and share the improvements to your health that result from removing gluten. My boys don't often ask questions until they have processed the info for awhile - give it time and give gentle nudges when the opportunity presents itself.

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Thanks for the advice, my son is very stubbern, wonder were he gets it, I had an OMM tell me last year I should look into a gluten-free diet, I totally went off on her saying how could a mechanical back problem be caused by gluten, I thought all of my problem were from being out of alignment all the time. I have since apologized to her.

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Thanks for the clarification shadowicewolf. I was confused because it said 2DQ2 I didn't know if I had two copies of the same gene upping the risk.

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Thanks for the advice, my son is very stubbern, wonder were he gets it, I had an OMM tell me last year I should look into a gluten-free diet, I totally went off on her saying how could a mechanical back problem be caused by gluten, I thought all of my problem were from being out of alignment all the time. I have since apologized to her.

Been there....my back pain, weak ankles and knees that popped out regularly from age 11 magically disappeared since I removed gluten three and half years ago! My back problems were blamed on missing a part of my last vertebrae and a rear-end collision at age 18 - crazy that it was what I was eating - but true. So glad I never had the back surgery they wanted to perform on me in the 80's!

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Irishhart I read the article you put in your post, very intresting, thanks.

That's the best explanation of NCGI and if Dr. Fasano, a leading celiac expert recognizes what it can do to a body, then I think it is worth considering.

Gluten sensitivity can create havoc. So even if you may not have celiac, you can still be suffering from some form of gluten sensitivity ---and being off gluten and feeling well is the only way to tell.

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Havoc, your not kidding, before I got sick my idea of a fun was cycling 100 miles as fast as I could so I already a good idea were my pain threshold was until last spring when I would spend most mornings in the fetal whimpering and tryin to talk myself into going to work. It only took one week of being gluten-free to start feeling better I just can keep thinking that it was somthing more than a sensitivity, I just need to except it and move on. I was just suprized that my test wasn't definitive, but as many of you have said the testing is not the end all! Thanks again for the info.

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