Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Enterolab Results - Help Me Understand Gene Results


  • Please log in to reply

3 replies to this topic

#1 tripfecta

 
tripfecta

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
 

Posted 02 November 2012 - 01:44 PM

I'm a little confused by my results. Are they indicative of Celiac or gluten sensitivity? My symptoms have gone away since I have gone gluten free, so I will continue that path. Since I have genes from both parents, should I have my children tested? They have been gluten free for a couple months, but I'm wondering if I should have them do the gluten challenge and do a blood test for them. They (triplets) are almost two, but I only saw symptoms in one of my daughters. Not sure where to go with my kids, as I'm seeing improvements with their gluten free diet, but it would be helpful to get an official diagnosis.
Any insight or advice is appreciated. Thank you!!


These are my results:

Date: 11/2/2012

B) Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 8 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-soy IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0202

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0501

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5)

Add Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody to panel A+C, A, B, or C at a discounted price
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: The level of intestinal anti-gliadin IgA antibody was below the upper limit of normal, and hence there is no direct evidence of active gluten sensitivity from this test. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), the level of fecal anti-gliadin antibody can be normal despite clinically significant gluten sensitivity. Therefore, if you have a syndrome known to be associated with gluten sensitivity (of which there are many but mainly falling into six categories abbreviated as NAAAGS – neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, asthma, abdominal, glandular deficiencies/hyperactivity, or skin diseases) or symptoms of gluten sensitivity (such as abdominal symptoms - pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation, chronic headaches, chronic sinus congestion, depression, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue), a gluten-free diet may help you despite a negative test.

If you have no syndrome or symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity, you can follow a gluten-containing healthy diet and retest in 3-5 years; or you may opt to go gluten-free purely as a preventive measure. If you have been on a gluten-free diet or reduced gluten diet for many months or years at the time of testing, this can (but not always) reduce your fecal antigliadin antibody level into the normal range despite underlying gluten sensitivity. (Usually it takes two or more years of a gluten-free diet to normalize a previously elevated fecal antigliadin antibody level, depending on the strictness of the diet; however, sometimes, this time period can be shorter, especially if the original value was only minimally elevated.)

For additional information on result interpretation, as well as educational information on the subject of gluten sensitivity, please see the "FAQ Result Interpretation," "FAQ Gluten/Food Sensitivity," and "Research & Education" links on our EnteroLab.com website.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: A value less than 10 Units indicates that there currently is minimal or no immunologic reaction to milk, and hence no direct evidence of food sensitivity to this specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, such as chronic headaches, abdominal symptoms (pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation), chronic sinus congestion, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. If you have been on a diet reduced or devoid of the suspect food for many months or years (usually but not always requires two or more years), this can also (but will not always) reduce your fecal antibody level to that food into the normal range despite underlying ongoing sensitivity to that food.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA: A value less than 10 Units indicates that there currently is minimal or no immunologic reaction to egg, and hence no direct evidence of food sensitivity to this specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, such as chronic headaches, abdominal symptoms (pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation), chronic sinus congestion, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. If you have been on a diet reduced or devoid of the suspect food for many months or years (usually but not always requires two or more years), this can also (but will not always) reduce your fecal antibody level to that food into the normal range despite underlying ongoing sensitivity to that food.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-soy IgA: A value less than 10 Units indicates that there currently is minimal or no immunologic reaction to soy, and hence no direct evidence of food sensitivity to this specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, such as chronic headaches, abdominal symptoms (pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation), chronic sinus congestion, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. If you have been on a diet reduced or devoid of the suspect food for many months or years (usually but not always requires two or more years), this can also (but will not always) reduce your fecal antibody level to that food into the normal range despite underlying ongoing sensitivity to that food.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 other than by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 other than by HLA-DQB1*0302). Furthermore, HLA-DQ2 genes other than by HLA-DQB1*0201 can be associated with celiac sprue in rare cases. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe. This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by the American Red Cross - Northeast Division. It has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal. Hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction to this enzyme.

For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab.../FaqResult.aspx

Stool analysis performed and/or supervised by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab
Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross
Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab

Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health.

Edited by tripfecta, 02 November 2012 - 02:02 PM.

  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 mars817

 
mars817

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 18 posts
 

Posted 02 November 2012 - 02:50 PM

I'm pretty new to this, I just got my enterolab results yesterday but have been researching a lot of what they meant. Maybe someone else has better answers but it doesn't really look to me like you are showing gluten sensitivity since your test was less than 10. Also the genes you have are not indicitive of celiacs, so you could be gluten sensitive but probably not celiacs. Your daughters would have at least one gluten senisitive gene from you. I don't know about doing a gluten challenge I don't think a gluten sensitivity would show up on a blood test but maybe someone else could chime in better on that.
  • 0

#3 kareng

 
kareng

    Be Royal

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,121 posts
 

Posted 02 November 2012 - 08:07 PM

Info you might need to know:

http://www.curecelia...erolab-or-cyrex



"Why don’t you recognize tests (stool tests or otherwise) for gluten sensitivity that are currently available through companies like Enterolab or Cyrex?
We only embrace tests that have endured rigorous scientific evaluations. So far, these tests have received no evidence-based support."
  • 0

LTES

 
"We've waited 29 years for this and not even a Giant can stand in our way." - Mayor Sly James
 
 
 
 
Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator
 

 


#4 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,177 posts
 

Posted 03 November 2012 - 06:11 AM

Maybe you could contact the lab and get your results interpreted in English. I tested with another lab and was wholly impressed., I got a full explanation of the genetic results and also they could tell me about my parents and children's genes since mine were 4/4. I had 2 genes alleles for celiac and two for gluten intolerance. These are listed by my profile. I know there is some mistrust of these tests, but my chiro and MD backed them. The MD called them the new gold standard. There is a difference of opionion and each should decide carefully for themself.

My reactions when I went gluten free definatly backed my test results. I am optismistic that others who have undergone this testing also may chime in.

Diana
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: