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I Feel Like I Am Going To Die....:(


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#16 Celiac Mindwarp

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 10:22 PM

I am crying here, for you and for me - I had actually FORGOTTEN how bad I was with this disease. I was dragging myself about, no idea how I would get the energy to go and pick up the kids, poor husband shattered from all the extra work. Feeling bad about not playing with my kids enough.

It will get better once you STOP THE GLUTEN.

I found that though my vitamin levels were in the normal range several were low. I now have sublingual b12, good gluten-free multivitamin and probiotics. You can end up not absorbing because of gut damage. Many have aneamia or vit d low. Many of these are associated with converting food to energy and releasing it.

For now find simple foods, and have some nearby before husband goes out. I use rice or sweet potato a lot. Sometimes just cold, bit of grated cheese on. Avocado is good, with tinned tuna. Dont worry if it doesn't look like a normal meal!

I am now back to being able to cook, clean, look after kids, and even have fun for myself :)

Be aware too that the illness itself can also cause anxiety, depression etc. Which can also improve with the gluten-free diet.

Hang in there and hang out here. We understand.

Welcome and good luck x
  • 2
- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

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#17 shadowicewolf

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:01 PM

You can do it. Take it from a college student.

I buy whole foods generally (sans my chex and my corn tortillas and pasta). I spend about $30 on food per week.

Crock pots, i've heard, are lovely to have. Pop some meat and veggies in it and you'll have a good dinner. Rice is rather inexpensive as well.

You will learn how to do this, you have no choice but to. Some of your post does kind of sound like an excuse (no offense intended here). At this point in time, there is no need for you to eat the $5 bread as the best you can do at the moment is avoid all proccessed foods.

It is an adjustment, there is no doubt about that. Since you have children, you need to be extra careful about Cross contamination (aka CC). So no sharing of anything. This includes drinks, peanut butter jars, mayo stuffs, etc. Squeeze bottles are lovely for this reason.

As for the pots and pans, as long as they aren't scratched, they should be fine. Wooden spoons are easily replaceable as are colenders.

Corn starch is also good in palce of flour in gravys (though mix it with something cold before adding to avoid the bugger like clumping!).

Energy is a big deal. I understand that well. I just tell myself "I'm going to do this, get it over with, and come home and take a nap".
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#18 Adalaide

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    It needs to be about 20% cooler.

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:26 AM

The cost isn't so bad. I thought at first that the cost would kill me. Then I just stopped buying "gluten free" foods. You don't need bread, crackers and all that junk, because it is JUNK! Eat fruits, vegetables, meats and gluten free grains like rice. Once I realized I can change the way I eat entirely, and do it almost with no effort, it changed everything for me. Crock pots are one of God's greatest gifts. If you don't have one, this is a great time of year to pick one up at a Wal-Mart for a really great deal. Add meat, potatoes, or whatever vegetables, let cook all day and you have dinner. You didn't even have to DO anything! This can help you get through for a few weeks until you gain enough strength to learn your way around gluten free cooking for yourself, although it really is simple. Once spring rolls around again, find the closest farmer's market or some such and make use of the cheap fresh veggies and fruits you can get. I promise, once you give up that crap people market to us as if our lives aren't worth living without shoveling so much refined carbs into ourselves we could vomit, it really isn't expensive at all. And all you really need is non-scratched pans. One good large frying pan and one large pot should be sufficient for you, I bought stainless steel so they will never need to be replaced. (Although I also have a good non-stick because I can't live without one.)

Oh, and I should have thought of this but didn't but looking up at shadow made me think of it. Tacos. Just use Mission brand corn tortillas instead of flour tortillas for soft tacos. And watch that taco seasoning, I can not figure out what the hell people need wheat in tacos for but omg, they put wheat in taco seasoning in a few brands. I just know tacos were a favorite in my house for my kids and they're relatively cheap. Then you can use the leftovers to make quesadillas the next night so it's different, but nearly effortless because it is leftovers and best of all... cheap!
  • 1

"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#19 ncdave

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 09:35 AM

Lot"s of good info in this thread, i think i read my first post on this forum about 100 times. I suggest you read over this one quiet a few also. Maby even get hubby to read over it. The food labeled gluten free is expensive, lucky for you that you don"t need to be trying to eat any of that right now!! It will take a couple of weeks to get over eating gluten then you should start seeing a big differance. At that point you will start the healing process. No need to be hungry, eat all the fresh fruit, ,veggies, an meat you want. Stay away from packaged food for a while, no canned or packaged food an you"ll get off to a good start. If there"s something you absutley must have just ask an we will point you in the right direction so you don"t get glutened. Going gluten free is not easy, you have a lot to learn, the results will be amazing when you get it figured out. Until then there"s great support right here on this forum. Feel free to complain, whine, vent, thats what were here for. You can do this, because you have no choice. Focus on how good your going to feel an think of all the food you can eat. Avoid thinking about what you can"t eat, an don"t get hungry. That only makes you want something you can"t have!!
  • 1
gluten free 12/11
dairy free 2/12
soy free 10/12
corn free 10/12
nightshade free 10/12

#20 GFinDC

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:10 AM

Fatigue is a problem, I had plenty of fatigue for a long time too. It does make doing things harder. Your fatigue coud be due to vitamin defiiciencies, or a thyroid problem (Hashimoto's thyroiditis). Both are things that happen to celiacs more than other people.

Here are a couple more meal idea threads. There are also lots of snack threads on the forum if you use the search feature on top right of the pages. The crock pot is a nice way to make a dinner without much effort. No need to watch it or check it just turn it on and leave.

Gluten-free should be less expensive than regular food, if you do it by eating whole foods. Processed foods have the extra cost of packaging and marketing and the chemicals they add to make it look and taste better and be shelf stable beyond what it's natural useability would be. You don't need to eat bread at all. Or you can make the microwave buns in the thead above in 90 seconds if you want to. I used to make those and then slice them in half and grill them in a hot pan for a little bit. They were too thick for the toaster. Now I just eat Mission corn tortillas or taco shells if I want bread like things.

if you like peanuts Planters labels their nuts for gluten containing ingredients. As of now their cocktail peanuts are gluten-free. But always check labels when you buy a product, even if you have bought it before. Ingredients can change.

It will probably take some time before you get over the fatigue, but everyone is different and you may recover quickly. Hard to tell. But the more you stick to a whole foods simple diet at the beginning, the less junk there is for your body to work on eliminating and processing. You don't have to shop at Whole Foods Market, there is plenty of gluten-free food at regular groceries. Think about eating the way people did 60 or 100 years ago, without all the modern packaged food-like substances. Those people survived just fine on real foods.And they did it without microwaves! :) A pressure cooker is another way to cook things fast, and is great for making soups or roasts, beans etc.

Super Easy Meal Ideas Anyone?
http://www.celiac.co...l-ideas-anyone/

Thread For gluten-free, Dairy, Soy, Corn And Nightshade Free Recipes
http://www.celiac.co...e-free-recipes/
  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#21 WendyLee

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 03:31 PM

My neighbour had some sound advice, especially for newbies. Don't eat anything that's been through a factory. No grains , no milk, no sugar.
  • 2
Doctor diagnosis 8 Feb 2012
Specialist diagnosis 5 March 2012
Started GFD 17 March 2012 after Endoscopy
Blood work & Endoscopy

#22 MitziG

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 08:54 PM

Chex cereals- gluten free and cheap. Beans and rice in corn tortillas. Scrambled eggs. Fresh fruit, peanut butter with apples, celery or bananas is a good quick go to snack. Stick to boring and basic for right now, aFter a few weeks, you will start to feel a bit better and you can get more creative. Just avoid bread for right now. I have tried making my own, and honestly, gluten-free flour is so expensive that my loaves aren't any cheaper anyway, so we just don't eat a lot of it.

There are a lot of mainstream foods that are Already gluten-free, and you will learn which ones they are. You don't necessarily haVe to spend a lot on specialty products. Flour is the only must, and the cheapest solution is to seriously linit your amount of baked goods. Not really good for you anyway.

You can do this, we have all been there before. That's why this is a SUPPORT group!
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#23 a84c72

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 09:00 PM

I love my rice and potatoes, but my insulin resistance certainly does not. I also have to watch many fruits.

My big joke now : I might as well just go graze in the yard.

How does this work when there is a sugar issue?

Appreciate the support!
  • 0
**POOF** Out.

#24 Takala

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 09:58 PM

You graze in the refrigerator. You eat enough of the stuff without sugar that you are full.
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#25 MitziG

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:28 AM

Chances are good your insulin resistance may go away when you have been gluten-free for awhile. In the meantime, you are going to be more limited, for sure, and have to stick more heavily to the veggies than the fruits. There isn't an easy solution for most of us, and this is something that we had to learn to deal with. You will too.
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#26 1desperateladysaved

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:47 AM

Unless you are a vegetarian. Eat meat for every meal. I just discovered my body is absorbing meat, but practically nothing else. Surprise, the best food for me is meat?! I always thought that grains should be at the base of my diet plan.
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#27 Adalaide

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    It needs to be about 20% cooler.

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 06:25 AM

I'm not really familiar with how insulin resistance effects you, but my husband is a type 1 diabetic. I realize that this is far different than people who can manage with diet, even a little, or with pretty much any other type of similar issues, but it does make me very aware of what he eats. For a time he was gluten free (and it looks like he will be again) and the biggest problem he seemed to have was processed gluten free foods. They are pretty much boxes of refined carbs that would spike his sugar out of control high so fast he couldn't control it and then he would crash like someone just turned off his engines. Instead of the refined carbs of "saltines" or "ritz" style crackers, we get crackers made of seeds and whole grains like quinoa. Yes, they're totally different, but when I stopped expecting them to be what they aren't (gluten cracker substitutes) and accepted them for what they are, I began to enjoy them greatly.

I'm not sure if you see an endocrinologist at this point, but my husband's doctor has a nutritionist on staff. At any time a patient can request to see her along with a regular visit without any additional charges. If that is something you have available you may want to take advantage. The one thing the nutritionist told my husband was to always always have protein. Instead of an apple which could spike him, adding peanut butter can help smooth out that spike. She admits that everyone is effected differently but this seems to work for him at least to some extent.

After 11 months, I feel better than a year ago but I certainly far from symptom free. Every person is different, will react differently, heal differently, and eliminate different things. Many eliminate milk, and it is sound advice. But if you don't feel like you want or need to, and it doesn't make you sick, don't go giving up things you aren't ready to give up. Very obviously, gluten makes you sick. Beyond that, give up only what you are ready to and when you are ready to. (And if it makes you sick, you need to be ready!)
  • 0

"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#28 1desperateladysaved

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:11 AM

I am thinking if I ever get my energy back again to go out and give people in this tough spot a hand. To think there was once a thought in my mind that house keeping was an uneeded job! i have sure been shown. Thank God my children are willing to help.

Diana
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#29 GFinDC

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 09:01 AM

HI,

You could look at Paleo/primal diets and see if they work for you. Eating grain free and low carb is not a bad way to go. Lots of meat (protein) in your diet is good as protein reduces the total glycemic index of your meal. Vinegar in a meal is also supposed to slow the conversion to sugar in your meals. So some mustard or rice wine vinager might be helpful in your meals. Alpha-lipoic acid may help too. Smaller meals are probably a good idea, vs big meals.
  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#30 sisterlynr

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:24 AM

Yes...I have read so much about Celiac disease. I know it included fatigue, but not aware of the AMOUNT of sleep that would fall into this.

Our lifestyle is a bit strange and I know I have to find a way to change it NOW. Because I am exhausted all of the time and my husband works 40 hours a week and tries to make up at home what I can't do, we do quick stuff..be it very simple shake and bake meals, etc.....I don't even know if I could hack following a recipe at this point in time. We are very strapped for cash being a one-income household. My husband's income dropped when the economy started going into the can...he lost many incentives and bonus opportunities.

I was in Whole Foods Thursday (it is an hour away from us...we don't have one where I am) and I was in awe at all fo the options, HOWEVER, there is no way I could spend $5 for a loaf of bread....or 2.50 for a can of soup......$4 for a microwave meal...etc.

The other option for shopping where I am in Meijer. And Meijer as many things, but they are just as expensive.

I puchased these crackers once made by Diamond thinking they have to be good...it's a company that's known! WRONG. They were hard and horrible and they weren't cheap. SO....that is another thing I face: how do I know what is good and what isn't? Very hard to drop the extra money on the unknown:(

My family isn't gluten free. There are no separate toasters.....dishes.....and I will be straight out and honest: I cannot buy new pots and pans and dishes. A $10 toaster I could probably swing...but not pots and pans.

But, perhaps the biggest obstacle is getting the energy to going to the grocery store PERIOD. Even when I do get up, I have no energy to go to do the store. I rarely leave the house unless it is to take the kids to school or pick them up. I don't even do any of my crafts, anymore. I don't see my friends....and it's depressing me.

I'm not looking to make excuses because,
As I said, I've been gluten free for 2 days now..mainly doing "gluten-free" ordering out from restaurants. So far, I've had no major symptoms like I've had (Gut burning, diarrhea, etc). I am just trying to figure out HOW to do this based on the circumstances given. How do I do this when I am sleeping so much and in pain...at least until I can overcome many of these symptoms?

I am downright scared. I truly am. I miss my kids and they are starting to prefer their dad over me (I've noticed the excessive tiredness for over a year and it's gotten worse since September).

I really do appreciate the input. Without it, I'd be lost!


I see you are insulin resistant and assume you are diabetic. Diabetes alone can cause the fatigue that you are feeling. Are you blood sugars regulated by insulin? I have checked with each of my pharmaceutical companies to be sure that my medication is gluten-free.

I completely understand being in a financial hardship. I am on SS Disability due to cancer but I find buying fresh frozen vegetables, fresh chicken other meats is much cheaper than eating out. I know Miejers has great sales and you can always purchase their special brand of foods.

In my case, I was not aware until just a month ago that I was Celiac. I have had cancer (in remission), diagnosed with PCOS, insulin resistant, Type II Diabetes, Osteoarthritis, low iron, low hemoglobin, come to find out, ALL of these can be caused by Celiac.

Please listen to the above comments by the folks on this forum! I too was sleeping almost round the clock and in just a matter of weeks I have improved immensely! I still have some days that I sleep too much but very infrequent. Prayers and ((hugs))
  • 0

Misdiagnosed DH symptoms for 30 years in the form of blisters on shoulders, scalp, sole of foot and lower back.
Type II Diabetes 1995  /   Fatty liver biopsy 2001  ~ Diagnosed with NH Lymphoma in 2007 metastasized to bones & Stage IV by 2008 Chemotherapy in 2008 ~ Breakout of rash from scalp to sole of feet. February 28, 2012 until present
Iron deficiency anemia - July of 2012  /  
Osteoarthritis. September 2012  2012 Rash was diagnosed as Eczema, Grover's Disease, Folliculitis per biopsies of the lesions. September 2012   Started Dapsone and Gluten-Free diet on October 20, 2012 ~ Diag DH 2012.  Not taking Dapsone due to sulfa reaction.  Biopsy in July 2013 indicates Lupus but my doctors do not agree on cause of rash for various reasons.  

 

~Lyn~



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