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November 11 Is Remembrance Day
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In Canada, and in some other countries who were allied with England, we wear a poppy to commemorate the sacrifice of those who gave their lives so that we could enjoy freedom today. Originally it marked World War I; today it remembers the dead of that war, and all wars since.

The poppy emblem is inspired by the poem below by Canadian Lt Col. John McCrae, who himself became one of the dead not long after writing this.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie,

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

If you appreciate your freedom, thank a veteran. Take a minute today to think about them and say thanks.

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This is a beautiful poem, Peter. Thanks for posting it.

The veterans distribute poppies here as thank yous for donations to veterans groups.

Some of us wear them on our jackets.

My beloved Dad and my FIL, several uncles and several cousins and some friends--all veterans--and I do indeed appreciate their service.

My uncle was shot down over Germany and was injured and received a medal and my Dad (who was stationed in Paris during the war) always said he was the real hero.

He and his brothers all served in Europe at the same time.They were 20, 23 and 25 years old.

My grandmother must have been worried sick. Fortunately, they all came home in one piece.

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My family is very, VERY large. I have over a dozen active military members between all of my cousins. All of whom I am grateful for. I pray every day for the ones overseas, hoping they will come home to their family again. I also have a lot of retired military.

My dad's dad is a WWII veteran. I couldn't be more proud. He fought in the battle of the bulge and thankfully made it home to share the stories or I wouldn't be here today. I only regret that as a little girl I had paid more attention. When I was 7, war stories were boooooooooring.

Remember, if you enjoy your freedom, no matter how you feel about war, thank a veteran today. And every day. Men and women bleed and die for our way of life, and no matter how you feel about that, be thankful that you enjoy the fruits of their sacrifice.

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Wonderful thoughts all. I too have family members that fought and otherwise served our country in the military. Two gave all. I am grateful to all of the men and women who serve.

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Thank you for sharing this poem Peter. My FB status today:

Today I remember my Grandfather - he was a quiet man that never shared his WWI experience with his family as many of his generation and those that follow do not.

My father researched his history and found my Grandfather served in 27th Division from New York City. While in France this division participated in the Somme Offensive and provided a break through of the Hindenburg Line itself forcing the Germans into general retreat which led directly to the Armistice that took effect at eleven o'clock in the morning—the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" of 1918.

There is a movie that was made about a US soldier during the battle in the Argonne Forest entitled 'The Lost Battalion'. The boys and I watched this movie with my father a while back - to know that my grandfather lived through similar battles was incredible and humbling - for this -- much belatedly -- I am grateful.

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'Twas a very moving ceremony at the National War Memorial here in the Canadian capital. Many aged faces, standing ram-rod straight, some with haunted looks in their eyes...

I am so glad I live in a place where I can be assembled within such a mammoth gathering, honouring such brave men and women....

2851406958_e145c20507.jpg

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Because I didn't pay attention as a girl, but I know he shared his story many times with many people I was able to find it online. Sure this focuses more on his CCC service, but it covers his military service as well. The man interviewed, Fred Carr, is my grandfather. I may have married twice and changed my name both times, but I'm a Carr girl. I'll always be proud of that, and it's because my family is full of men of character, but none so much as my grandfather.

http://www.sungazett.../id/569848.html

And the local high school interviewed him as well at one point. It breaks my heart to see him break talking about the casualties they suffered.

http://library.thinkquest.org/06aug/00459/fredcarr.html

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Because I didn't pay attention as a girl, but I know he shared his story many times with many people I was able to find it online. Sure this focuses more on his CCC service, but it covers his military service as well. The man interviewed, Fred Carr, is my grandfather. I may have married twice and changed my name both times, but I'm a Carr girl. I'll always be proud of that, and it's because my family is full of men of character, but none so much as my grandfather.

http://www.sungazett.../id/569848.html

And the local high school interviewed him as well at one point. It breaks my heart to see him break talking about the casualties they suffered.

http://library.think...9/fredcarr.html

I love this...one of my sons had the opportunity to produce a video for the National Stories of Service project -- he met a WWII Veteran that became a good family friend and his story left a lasting real world understanding of sacrifice with my son. Projects like these are invaluable as they preserve history that we are silently losing. I hope these projects spread to get as many stories as possible on record.

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I love this...one of my sons had the opportunity to produce a video for the National Stories of Service project -- he met a WWII Veteran that became a good family friend and his story left a lasting real world understanding of sacrifice with my son. Projects like these are invaluable as they preserve history that we are silently losing. I hope these projects spread to get as many stories as possible on record.

I think it is so important to preserve individual stories. Things like WWII aren't just wars in history books. They are things that happened that shaped probably every one of our individual lives. We should all be so lucky to know the part our family and ancestors played in shaping the world. I suppose maybe you view war differently when your grandfather fought in a battle that changed the tide, and fate of the world. You, like me, are lucky to know that. What a proud heritage we both have. :)

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Today is November 11, and this topic is as relevant as it was two years ago. Perhaps even more so with the recent deaths of Corporal Nathan Cirillo and Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent in terrorist attacks here in Canada.

Lest we forget.

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Nicely said, Peter.

 

My oldest is a junior cadet and is excited to be in another Remembrance Day ceremony.  He's so proud to wear his little naval uniform and the poppy... He was a bit disappointed this year when the weather changed (it's -25C with the windchill) and he had to cover up his uniform with a snowsuit and a balaclava.  LOL ;)

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Our Girl Scout Troop is headed out to watch or town's Veteran's Day Parade and ceremony. We have a few neighbor veterans in their 80's who can march that mile!

We are thankful to those who have served (my Dad, Uncles and FIL)and are serving (my niece!)

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A belated thank you for the service that has been done or ongoing to those who serve(d).

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