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Cleaning Products With Gluten Inside Of Them?
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How careful should I be? I went to pick up baking soda today and it wasn't labeled gluten free.... the only thing close to it was baking powder or corn starch. The baking powder was so expensive I just got baking soda... there was store brand vinegar for a dollar or the "gluten free" heinz for 2.99... I just want to wash the walls ... how will this affect me if it's "contaminated?" If I touch the surface ever again will I be hit with it? I have cuts and burns right now. am I going to get it in my body?

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Most things that are gluten-free are not labelled gluten-free. They do not contain any gluten ingredients. I use cheap vinegar to clean. I wouldn't hesitate to use the Baking soda either.

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As stated, many things are out there that are gluten free without a label. There are some things labeled gluten free that I refuse to buy, such as water. OF COURSE water is gluten free! If you are cleaning with these because it is your preferred method, I see no reason you shouldn't do whatever makes you happy with those products. Including eating them. No reason they would contain gluten. If you are using them because you are afraid of gluten in regular cleaning products, I wouldn't worry about it so much. If you have a cell phone you can call every company before you purchase something, right from the store.

As for cuts on your hands? I wouldn't worry there either. Celiac is an autoimmune reaction that happens inside the small intestine. Even if you accidentally took the lid off of the wheat flour and stuck your hand straight in it, it wouldn't really be cause for concern unless you have an allergy. In which case, panic! Okay, don't do that, go to the ER, call a family member, get your epi-pen or w/e it is you would need to do.

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I agree with Karen-- you are fine with those. I use cheap white vinegar often in the laundry, for cleaning, etc. I prefer it to a lot of chemicals.

Gluten needs to get into your digestive system to cause a reaction, so no worries about your cuts. Of course the vinegar might sting those so be careful!

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I think the only time you'd have to be concerned is if there was gluten in your dish soap, but I can't imagine anything of the sort having gluten in it (conventional stuff is all chemicals, natural stuff I've never ever seen a problem with).

I cook (and clean) with regular ol Arm & Hammer baking soda, and unless you're using malt vinegar for cleaning, you'll be fine.

Happy cleaning!

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Actually, the Ecover lemon scent dish soap has gluten in it, which I know because I use

the chamomile scent as shampoo (don't ask how that got started... :ph34r: ) And I bought a lemon

one by accident one day, and was reading it in the shower, and it says right there: wheat protein.

How wude! Definitely wouldn't want to use it on my dishes..... Anyhoo, it's certainly quite rare,

but certain products do contain gluten. Not products like baking soda, or epsom salts, or something

like that, but packaged things with more than one ingredient always warrant a look.

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I cook (and clean) with regular ol Arm & Hammer baking soda, and unless you're using malt vinegar for cleaning, you'll be fine.

Happy cleaning!

I think the Malt Vinegar myth has been dispelled, please read attached link.

http://noglutennoproblem.blogspot.ie/2010/04/rethinking-malt-vinegar.html

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I think the Malt Vinegar myth has been dispelled, please read attached link.

http://noglutennopro...lt-vinegar.html

This article states first that the malting process 'breaks down' gluten. In that case, why

is barley malt in cereals still not acceptable? Perhaps they are two different products

but are called the same thing for some reason? I am unsure.

Also, he points out that Coeliac UK considers barley malt vinegar to be acceptable. Last

I checked, the UK celiac groups consider less than 200 ppm to be gluten-free, which as

most people in the UK and here in the US have discovered, is less than accurate.

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I have sometimes struggled with coeliac uk advice. They do some great stuff, but do seem to have some quirks.

I am interested in the malt and malt vinegar questions (as long as we dont hijack the thread...)

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I don't know anything about this couple that wrote the article, they look like nice people but its not very scientific.

In the US, its pretty easy to stay away from malt vinegar so I will do that until I see some of the "Experts" test it.

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I have read a few articles about the malt barley issue. The most level headed ones all come the the same conclusion, that until there is more research none of us should be putting our health at risk. Because I react to the most miniscule amounts of gluten I could pretty easily test this out, but I am also not willing to risk my health and sanity, spending a month and a half in gluten hell, just to prove people on the internet are wrong. The accepted practice based on actual science is that malted vinegar isn't safe for us to consume. I'd also avoid cleaning with it since you'd just be wiping gluten all over everything.

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In terms of this question of using vinegar to clean with, Its much more expensive than cheap white vinegar or apple cider vinegar, I doubt anyone would clean with it. ^_^ (not sure what this smiley means, just liked him)

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Wow, I love when I accidentally start something. I mentioned malt vinegar because, well, you're not going to clean with it, and it's the only vinegar that is considered (by most of us) to be unsafe.

Good to know about the Ecover! If I ever get any of their dishsoap, I'll check the ingredients first.

We might have to start a thread about this barley malt/vinegar business. I think it's not safe. "Breaking down" gluten is not the same as there being none at all. It might not bother some people, but for sensivite celiacs it could be trouble. What scares me is if it's acceptable in the UK (200ppm! are you kidding me?!), then people might get the wrong idea, and begin to think that barley malt, or barley itself would be ok. Celiacs/Gluten Intolerants themselves would probably know better, but people who are making "gluten free" foods, at restaurants and such especially, might think it's ok when it's not. Best to be safe, say no barley whatsoever (unless distilled alcohol).

Anyway, as for the cleaning products, just keep reading the labels, and if it doesn't list it, it's probably ok.

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I never thought someone would think cleaning with it would be a good idea, well, not exactly. But for someone new who still may have some laying around the house that hasn't been thrown out yet, I thought it may be possible in a moment of "gluten head" to grab it not thinking. Or more accurately, thinking hey, I can't eat it I may as well clean something. Then later having that Homer Simpson DOH!!!! moment. It is exactly the sort of thing I would do. :lol:

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I never thought someone would think cleaning with it would be a good idea, well, not exactly. But for someone new who still may have some laying around the house that hasn't been thrown out yet, I thought it may be possible in a moment of "gluten head" to grab it not thinking. Or more accurately, thinking hey, I can't eat it I may as well clean something. Then later having that Homer Simpson DOH!!!! moment. It is exactly the sort of thing I would do. :lol:

-_- Maybe this is Mr Glutenhead?

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Quick check on coeliac uk

It is 20ppm now, since 2008.

There is a very low gluten category 21 to 200ppm.

Looks like the 200 was used historically.

I love my inner geek :)

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Thanks for checking that out! (re: UK levels). I'm headed to the UK in less than 2 weeks (can't wait! Gluten free jaffa cakes here I come!) and that kind of freaked me out.

Mr Glutenhead should be some kind of superhero (or sidekick...)

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Quick check on coeliac uk

It is 20ppm now, since 2008.

There is a very low gluten category 21 to 200ppm.

Looks like the 200 was used historically.

I love my inner geek :)

My inner geek watches Stargate. :ph34r:

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