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Kellogs Corn Flakes
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To all Celiacs, the only thing I see as suspicious In Kelloggs corn flakes is malt flavoring, anyone try this cereal and not have problems, yes I understand the varying degrees of gluten sensitivity, however, what's holding up Kelloggs from changing to something else????

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Has nothing to do with k

To all Celiacs, the only thing I see as suspicious In Kelloggs corn flakes is malt flavoring, anyone try this cereal and not have problems, yes I understand the varying degrees of gluten sensitivity, however, what's holding up Kelloggs from changing to something else????

Has nothing to do with "varying degrees of gluten sensitivity". If you have Celiac disease, no amount of gluten is medically acceptable, even with no visible symptoms.

As to why Kellogg's doesn't change the formula, good question for Kellogg's. :)

Lets consult the experts:

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/treatment

"The gluten-free diet is a lifetime requirement. Eating any gluten, no matter how small an amount, can damage your intestine. This is true for anyone with the disease, including people who do not have noticeable symptoms."

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You might find this interesting!

Extract:

It is a bit tricky to accurately test for barley hordein in food.

One assay, the sandwich omega-gliadin ELISA, severely underestimates gluten from barley, having a cross-reactivity of only 4 to 8%.

Another assay, the sandwich R5 ELISA, overestimates gluten from barley by a factor of 2.

When it comes to testing for gluten in a highly hydrolyzed product, such as barley malt, the test that usually overestimates barley contamination (i.e., the sandwich R5 ELISA) may now underestimate it.

There is an assay available for testing hydrolyzed ingredients–the competitive R5 ELISA—but the unit of measure for this assay is gluten peptides versus gluten.

Unfortunately, it is somewhat difficult to evaluate peptide concentration in terms of parts per million of gluten.

Thomas Grace, CEO of Bia Diagnostics, a food testing facility in Burlington, Vermont, says the following concerning the use of barley malt and barley malt extract in gluten-free foods:

“In my opinion until there is a reliable method that can detect all hydrolyzed hordeins (the harmful protein in barley) in these malts and extracts and correlate them with minimal reactive thresholds, manufacturers might want to stay away from barley malt and barley malt extract in gluten free labeled products.

We might find that some barley malts and barley malt extracts are fine for persons with celiac disease, but until we know that for sure and have a reliable method for verification one should proceed on the side of caution.”

http://www.glutenfre...ten-free-foods/

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