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Help For My Husband


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#16 Celiac Mindwarp

 
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Posted 28 November 2012 - 05:31 AM

I think it is a brilliant idea for you to come here. It can be lonely for anyone starting out.

Keep at it, you know you are going in the right direction
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- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

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#17 GFinDC

 
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Posted 28 November 2012 - 06:55 AM

Hi Katty,

Yeah, quinoa didn't work for me either in the long run. I haven't tried it in quite a while tho, might be ok now I guess. One day I will try it again. If you keep with a simple whole foods diet like you are doing it should help a lot. Sweet potatoes are safer than regular white potatoes and are much better nutrition wise too. they make good fries in the oven or you can buy Food Should Taste Good brand sweet potato chips too. They are gluten-free. Not all FSTG chips are gluten-free tho, so check the labels. Mission corn tortillas are also gluten-free and a pretty inexpensive way to make a roll up. Just rinse them in water and nuke them for a few seconds, or rinse them and throw them in a skillet with a lid. The yellow corn versions are thinner and less likely to break when folded. They are made on dedicated lines and I have never had a problem with them.

Bone broth is good for nutrition also, and is easy to make. Just cook some leftover bones from chicken or anything in water with some vegetables. The bones have minerals in bio-avaaialble form in them and they are easiy absorbed. Better than a vitamin pill. There's a thread or two on the forum somewhere about ways to make it.

It's pretty common for people new to the gluten-free diet to make mistakes and get cross-contaminated at first. So don't be too upset if that happens. We all do it sometimes.

Some of the things that help people when they do get glutened are:

Pepto-Bismol
Peppermint tea or Peppermint Altoids (to get gas out of the stomach)
Aspirin
Lots of water
Pro-biotics
Some people are drinking nettle tea and find that helpful.
Jumbo size toilet papper rolls ( :) )

Often it seems that people with celiac have low stomach acid, which can lead to problems with pathogens getting into the gut. So Betaine HCL is a good thing to have on hand.

DGL (Deglysterenized licorice) and mastic gum are two natural cures for H.Pylori, and can be helpful to take once in a while. DGL especaily is good for it. Mastic gum is reputed to be good for digestion.

Just some ideas of things it would be good to have on hand. None of these are real expensive usually.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#18 Katty

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:50 PM

I’m sorry for my hiatus, neither of us has been feeling very well for the past few days. I’m not sure what it is, but I’m guessing just part of the gluten withdrawal.

We actually used to order a lot of stuff from nuts.com (when they were nutsonline), but I haven’t looked at them since his diagnosis. We’ll have to make an order from them soon. Thanks for reminding me! I’d all but forgotten about the website.

I make bone broth, actually, though I’d always just called it stock. So glad to hear that it’s good for him, I had to give away cans upon cans of gluten-containing broth.

Thanks so much for the list of just-in-case stuff. :) Every little bit of information helps.

We took him to get his vitamin levels analyzed, we’re still waiting on the results. I don’t know why, but I was thinking we’d find out the same day! I completely forgot about them sending it to a lab. My memory hasn’t been too sharp since going gluten free.

We’re going to start walking tomorrow, which is something neither of us seem to be looking forward to given that it’s winter time. However, I know being out and exercising together will (should) help us feel better, and it’ll be a bonding thing hopefully.

I get lonely when he’s sleeping, but other than that, I’ve been okay. He’s been a lot more emotional on all fronts lately (hence why I quit my job). Very lonely when I’m away for extended periods. I don’t mind, it’s endearing, but I hope my taking care of him doesn’t cause extreme codependency in all aspects of life. Most of my outings were with friends and based around food, though, and most (if not all) of them think I’m ridiculous for giving up gluten.

They’ve actually dropped out of touch since he got diagnosed and seem reluctant to come over for dinner like they used to. It’s so irritating, but it just shows I need better friends anyway.

Our families can’t believe I gave up gluten, either. My Mother tried to take me for pizza the other day, after having a loaf of bread in the car. I told her that this is the exact reason I can’t eat gluten. I don’t want him to feel that temptation (and, from my perspective, disrespect). She was just trying to be nice, I know, but I had to make it very clear that I’m treating this as though I have celiac, too. It’s sort of an all or nothing thing, and I love him dearly, so all was my only option. And I don’t regret it one bit.

I made sweet potato fries with steak last night and it was a big hit. He’s so happy to have meat with every meal and he says it feels very gourmet, so that’s a bright point. I purchased a few paleo/primal cookbooks and they’re really helping. I realized I didn’t replace our drinking glasses, so I ordered new ones and I really hope I haven’t been glutening him with them. I’m not sure what gluten food would have been in them, but I just want to be sure.

Once we’re through the holidays, things will be better for both of us. We’re skipping Christmas dinner because there’s a long-standing tradition of bread bowls, and we don’t want the temptation. We’ll do an early Christmas instead, but I know he’s down about missing the bread bowls.

Anyway, thanks so much for being supportive. It helps to have somewhere to come and talk. He and I try not to talk about food too much because we always remember one more thing we’ll never have again. And whenever we talk too much about celiac, food comes up, of course.

Edited by Katty, 29 November 2012 - 11:56 PM.

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We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us. ~ Joseph Campbell

#19 GFinDC

 
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Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:05 AM

Oh Oh, you said the Christmas dinner phrase. Better duck, cause, now you are going to get hit with suggestions for Christmas dinner/day foods. There are usually threads for ideas on that around this time of year. Seems like there was a Christmas stollen thread a while back. I don't remember bread bowls, but maybe they have been done.

Yep, lots of social occasions are centered on food, mostly on eating it. Stuffing it in our pie-holes. But your friends may adjust after a while. Lots of people are trying gluten-free these days. If they want to be trendy, they need to get on board! :) Well, that won't be a popular opinion here. Oops. It's not just people with celiac who do the gluten-free diet. Some people with diabetes, and some people with Crohn's and other conditions also find it helpful. GFCFSF is used for some autistic children. too. gluten-free can be very low carb if you stick with mostly meat and veggies.

I am sorry you aren't feeling well. You may be experienceing some bacterial die-off since you have changed to gluten-free Katty. That can cause some symptoms. You might find it helpful to take some pro-biotics yourself.

By the way, tell hubby for me you are a keeper. :D
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#20 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:31 PM

This is like whole wheat bread - soft, yet grainy in a good way. It's called Bun in a Bowl & can be used for bread or burger buns.
Here's the recipe:

1 large egg (for low iodine use 2 egg whites & no egg yolk)
2 Tbs. brown rice flour (you can sub white rice flour or sweet white rice flour)
1 Tbs. almond meal (you can sub cashew meal)
1 Tbs. golden flax meal
1/2 tsp. baking powder
3/4 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. cocoa powder
shake of salt

Spray a custard dish (or any baking dish that will yield a hamburger bun sized "loaf") with non stick spray. Crack egg into dish and stir with a fork until it's well mixed. Add all other ingredients and stir well. Cook in microwave on high for 90 seconds. You'll have to loosen around the edges with a butter knife, but mine came out pretty easily.

I'm using some self-control to wait until lunch time to make another one and create a delicious turkey sandwich. (insert drool icon)



WHITE BREAD VERSION OF BUN IN A BOWL:

1 large egg (for low iodine use 2 large egg whites & no egg yolk)
2 Tblsp. White rice flour or sweet white rice flour
1 Tblsp. cashew meal (flour) if not sensitive to salicylates you can use almond meal (flour)
1 1/3 Tblsp. Golden Flax Meal
1/2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. sugar
shake of salt

Spray a custard dish (or any baking dish that will yield a hamburger bun sized "loaf") with non stick spray. Crack egg into dish and stir with a fork until it's well mixed. Add all other ingredients and stir well. Cook in microwave on high for 90 seconds. You'll have to loosen around the edges with a butter knife, but mine came out pretty easily.

And here's a recipe for you too. A friend on a gardening site discovered this by accident when her elderly mom goofed making Tollhouse Cookies. A fortunate OOPS as far as I'm concerned. Neither she nor her mom are celiac but she posted the recipe for me. She said they were quite good!


Gluten Free OOPS! Tollhouse Chocolate Chip Cookies


Kim's Mom's Oops Tollhouse Gluten free recipe

1/2 cup shortening(we used butter flavor crisco)
1/2 cup Splenda
1/4 cup Brown Sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
1 cup semi-sweet chocolate morsels
1/2 cup chopped nuts ( we used Black Walnuts)

and here is the goof part
1cup powdered sugar( was suposed to be flour but Mom oopsed)

Cream Together Shortening ,brown sugar,splenda, egg and vanilla.
Sift together powdered sugar, soda and salt; blend into creamed mixture.
Drop by teaspoon or cookie scoop 2" apart on greased cookie sheet.
These spread out and become very thin almost lacey.

Bake @ 375 degrees for 10-12 minutes. Cookies will be thin and golden. Remove to cooling rack and enjoy.

They actually did taste good, very sweet. I'm not sure if they would solve a tollhouse craving or not but worth a try.
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Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 


#21 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 01 December 2012 - 05:17 AM

My memory hasn’t been too sharp since going gluten free.

We’re going to start walking tomorrow, which is something neither of us seem to be looking forward to given that it’s winter time. However, I know being out and exercising together will (should) help us feel better, and it’ll be a bonding thing hopefully.

Most of my outings were with friends and based around food, though, and most (if not all) of them think I’m ridiculous for giving up gluten.

They’ve actually dropped out of touch since he got diagnosed and seem reluctant to come over for dinner like they used to. It’s so irritating, but it just shows I need better friends anyway.

Our families can’t believe I gave up gluten, either.

I realized I didn’t replace our drinking glasses, so I ordered new ones and I really hope I haven’t been glutening him with them. I’m not sure what gluten food would have been in them, but I just want to be sure.

but I know he’s down about missing the bread bowls.

Anyway, thanks so much for being supportive. It helps to have somewhere to come and talk. He and I try not to talk about food too much because we always remember one more thing we’ll never have again. And whenever we talk too much about celiac, food comes up, of course.


Hi again Katty!
You are likely having a gluten withdrawal if your memory feels off and you feel yucky right now. Hold tight--it will pass.
Drink a lot of water--both of you.

Walking is very good for you guys. You say it is winter now. I do not know where you live, but maybe you can drive to a shopping center
and walk around inside? (you wouldn't happen to be in upstate NY by any chance--near Albany maybe? Just a shot. If you were, I'd have you guys over for dinner tomorrow. I mean it.)

anyway,
A few thoughts ---because I can see you are going through all sorts of emotions and feeling stranded by friends and misunderstood by family members right now and my hubs and I went through all of this too--together.
He gave up gluten voluntarily after my diagnosis and he has never regretted it.

He does not miss it at all and even when he could eat it out (away from me), he hasn't.
He thinks he feels all the better for it (which suggests he had a gluten issue himself)

You need not to replace glassware hon. Just things that are porous like plastic colanders, plastic slotted spoons, wooden utensils. wire mesh strainers, scratched teflon pans or a pizza stone. Also-- wooden cutting boards. I replaced my toaster and I donated my bread machine to a woman's shelter, but many people clean them up and continue to use them.

You are looking at this "as things to give up", but in reality almost everything you once ate really CAN BE made again! You just need to find
gluten-free substitutes... yes, there are even "mock rye" bread bowls.!! :)

Do not isolate because you are gluten-free. You should still visit family and friends.
Bring your own goodies with you. You may wish to educate them about celiac, so they do not view what you are doing as "weird". If they continue to be non-supportive or mocking, then yes, maybe it is time for new friends. (sorry, but you guys can't live your lives with so much negativity around you. That's no fun!)

Once you get your sea legs back, you can see that food..... is still food.
Invite people to YOUR house. I had a 4 course dinner party for 8 relatives recently and no one missed the gluten.
This will all come to you, in time. I have 2 years under my belt now, but at the beginning, we felt the same way you guys are feeling.

Right now. let's get your hubs healing and you feeling better before you try and take on too much.
But I promise you, this is not a death sentence and it should not be the end of your social life.

I had a few friends desert us when I was very ill. That broke my heart.
But I also had a chance to visit 3 other couples in their homes during the last year. They missed me and worried about me when I was very ill for 3 years before my DX and they were happy to see me alive and kicking! :D

And they cooked for me!!. They took the time to learn about celiac & gluten and what to do to provide a safe meal for me. They asked me a lot of questions before we came over and I was deeply moved by this--and I gladly brought them all a flexible cutting board to use. I supervised dinner prep and helped with the dicing and slicing and I brought the wine and a wickedly decadent flourless chocolate cake for dessert. Everything was "normal" again.

The point is....you are still new to this and it is overwhelming and seems like you will never be "normal" again.
But you will find a "new normal" , hon---and soon, you both will feel less emotional and scared and overwhelmed.

The focus will no longer be "celiac". or gluten and "what can I have to eat" but just.....enjoying your life once more. I noticed a few weeks ago that I never say "Gluten free" this or "Gluten free" that anymore. It has become the norm... It's just food.

Hang in there. and call on me if I can help in any way. We've been where you are and I want to assure you--it gets better!! ((hugs)) to you.
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#22 Takala

 
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Posted 01 December 2012 - 05:27 PM

Watch out for the Splenda, especially the bulk splenda which may have fillers in it, which might not be entirely gluten free. That was one of the things I had to give up last year, switched to a gluten free stevia for low sugar baking.

Also, Crisco has soy in it, and some people don't do well with soy, but there are many other oils such as palm shortening, coconut oil, olive oil, lard, etc, (even butter) that can be baked with.

For the bun-in-a-cup microwave baking, a tiny bit of pure apple cider vinegar, say, about a quarter to a half teaspoon, helps the baking soda to rise. Substitutions may be made for the flax, such as chia seed or amaranth or buckwheat.

Since you are eating pretty low carb/starch, eat a lot of good fats to help fight the fatigue, because they are slow burning fuel, or, add in a bit of well rinsed and drained beans, or potatoes, or rice, if he needs them for energy. A gluten free vitamin B complex can also really help with this.

My spouse gave up gluten at home and most of the time out at restaurants (it doesn't bother me, because I am way past the "wish I could have that phase"). He's a keeper, too. :D

Holidays & Relatives ......... :ph34r: :blink: :wacko: <_<
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#23 Katty

 
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Posted 08 December 2012 - 07:08 PM

Hello again, everyone :) I had a minor family emergency and had to be away from home (and my laptop, since I left in such a hurry) for a while. My Husband seems to be improving mentally, meaning he says the brain-fog isn’t as bad, and he’s not sleeping as much these days. Sometimes he sleeps for like six hours now.

I’ve decided to make bread bowls using the White Bread recipe provided, and I’ll make the cookies, so we can attend Christmas as normal. It should make things so much easier on everyone, and keep the family happy.

Thankfully, I’m feeling better these days. I got extremely sick off of soy milk (I was putting it in my tea) and seem to be intolerant to it. My Husband doesn’t drink soy anyway, so it’s no big issue.

I wanted to extend a personal thank you to Irish Heart, I would love to have dinner with someone who understands! But, I live in Colorado, so that’s not exactly a possibility. :)

We’ve been walking around the block since I got home. My Husband actually started walking while I was away. He’s not experienced with cooking, so we spent many hours on the phone with my walking him through how to cook things. It was cute and seems to have given him a bit of a passion for it.

Travelling was odd for me. I could have eaten gluten, but I refused. I stuck to the diet as though he was there eating with my. And my (extended) family called me crazy. They did things just to tease me and it was so annoying. But, I survived! And so did my Husband, cooking for himself. He even came up with little lettuce cups that he’s addicted to now.

We invited a friend for dinner last night (kind of a “welcome back” thing for me, I guess) and I cooked. She didn’t complain one bit! It was nice. The family is kind of starting to get it, too, though his Father still doesn’t take gluten-free seriously. Despite diagnosis by biopsy.

His tests came back. He’s deficient in Vitamin D, which I expected, but all of his other levels are fine and so is his thyroid. So, the doctor (new doctor, I’m finished with the old one) prescribed 15 minutes of sunlight daily. He said he could get it through an open window, since winter attire doesn’t allow for much sun exposure.

At some point while I was gone, my Husband had a fit of rage (he says he got depressed over everything he can’t order in, like he used to do when I was away) and broke a few things in our home. A mirror and the mug he threw at it, to be specific. This is so unlike him and I was a little put off by it. I’m also worried about his depression making him suicidal or something. I know he’d never hurt me, but I can’t imagine him breaking things. I don’t want to leave him alone anymore.

Does anyone have experience with such severe depression/anger? He gets upset if I call it a mood swing, so I don’t think I’m understanding what he’s going through fully.

I went shopping when I got back home and purchased lots of things we’ve never tried before. Now I’m regretting that. It’s almost like I’m just asking to discover an allergy/intolerance. We’ll see, I guess.

It feels good to be back. My Husband read this thread while I was away and said that you all made him truly value our relationship, so thank you all for that.
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We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us. ~ Joseph Campbell

#24 Katty

 
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Posted 08 December 2012 - 07:44 PM

I have one more question (I’d edit my original post, but it’s not visible yet, given my “new-member” status)… My Husband’s stomach hasn’t been regular at all lately. He gets stomach cramping unlike anything ever experienced when we were eating gluten. Like a stabbing pain, he describes it. He’s gone two or three days without a bowel movement followed by a day with two or three.

Our (new) doctor said to expect such things over the next year and that it’s nothing. Is it the bacteria in his stomach regulating? Is this normal?

My Husband instinctively thinks it’s just his body trying to figure things out. It doesn’t correlate with any specific food or anything. Pepto doesn’t help him too much, either. I ordered a few things to help him today, but they won’t be here for a while, so I want to find out as much as I can in the meantime. Both doctors seem to think my concerns are silly or unfounded. It’s so annoying!

We completely changed our lifestyle, we just want to know that we’re doing things right, which is why I ask so many darn questions! (end mini-rant)

I have him drinking about 90 ounces of water daily, eating several times a day. My husband also thinks it might be all the healthy fats in our diet, since I tried to avoid oil/fat before his diagnosis. I didn’t understand that bodies need those healthy fats, but after researching, added olive oil, fish and nuts into our diet. Anyway, is the fat thing possibly it? Is the doctor right, just deal with it for the next year or so?
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We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us. ~ Joseph Campbell

#25 GFinDC

 
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Posted 09 December 2012 - 05:47 AM

Hi Katy,

Yes, it is possible his digestion will be unsettled for the next year or more. It is also possible it will get right as rain in a month or so. Sticking with whole foods is one way to speed up the healing process. Adding lots of new things right now is not great idea really. If you are adding things make sure to only add one new thing a day, not don't add another one for several days after that. Otherwise reactions can't be pinned down to a specific food. The simpler the diet the better to start out. Starting out is not a week or two, but several months. It's very easy when you are new to the gluten-free diet to make mistakes and eat something with gluten or CC without realizing it. That's another reason to keep the diet simple, so those mistakes are less likely.

By simple I don't mean you can't eat good food, but avoid processed foods and if you want something more complicated make it yourself at home. That way you know what the ingredients are and aren't guessing so much. It requires a lot of cooking but there are things you can do to make it easier,. Like making large batches of food and freezing some of it for later. If you do that every weekend you can have a freezer full of homemade food in a month. If you do this keep the spices and additives to a minimum. It is no fun to make a large batch of food and have to throw it out because you added some ingredient that is a problem. Instead add spices when you actually heat the food up to eat it.

Gluten can affect the brain. People here have reported anger, anxiety, depression, nervousness, insomnia and other affects from gluten.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#26 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 09 December 2012 - 05:48 AM

IMHO. your husband is having a normal reaction to all that is happening in his body and brain chemistry.(and adjusting to being gluten free and realizing that his life--and yours--is changed) Anyone who is diagnosed with a serious disease will go through these stages.

Frankly, I threw things and screamed at the top of my lungs a few times when I was quite ill pre-DX (totally uncharacteristic for me! ) and I am not surprised to hear he is struggling. I know it is alarming, but blow it off and forgive him. If he is not normally an abusive or angry person, then you know he does not mean it. (If he gets crazy and throws things at you, of course, that is a different story--and I am sure you will not tolerate that nonsense!).

There is such a thing as gluten rage. There is such a thing as gluten withdrawal. But once he starts to heal his gut and his nervous system stops working overtime, he will not be so erratic (fingers crossed) I do not know your husband so I can't say whether this behavior is okay or not, but I know my husband and if he threw something and broke it, I would know his anger was momentary and nothing to worry about. We all have our "moments" :)

I agree with the doctor that it is going to take a long time for his system to right itself. I'm sorry, but there is no magic speed-up button for this
recovery. Resolving long term malabsorption could take a while.
Do not despair. It gets better as each month passes.

He could be moody because his vitamin D is low. I do not agree with the doctor that opening a window to the sun is going to get his vitamin D level up where it needs to be. That's insufficient. IMHO He can take 2,000 IUs
of Vitamin D3 daily (County Life makes certified gluten-free vitamins) and it will help. It may help with the depression and yes, why not call them mood swings? that's what they are. (they are not reserved for women ad little children ) :D

Have him take Culturelle Probiotics (dairy and gluten-free) and a Tablespoon of ground flaxseed meal in 16 oz. of water. That should help the constipation. Try not to give him too many laxatives/stimulants. It just creates spasms in the colon and more pain.

I feel I have to say this disclaimer every time I give this advice about correcting the bowels: I am not a doctor.

I certainly never expected to become so well-versed in poopology :lol: But I have read enough about the GI tract and what works to balance gut flora (because I had a deficiency of good gut bacteria upon DX and suffered "IBS" my entire life) and I am only suggesting what worked for me and so many others. I had the same issues your hubs is having and I can attest to the fact that it is very frustrating to feel so up and down and wonder what the hell is going on. My bowels are right as rain now and his will improve too.

Dump the soy milk, IMHO. Try So Delicious Coconut milk (red carton -dairy section) Good calcium and tastes great.

This is a long road but there is a light at the end of the tunnel (and it is not necessarily an oncoming train) :lol:Watch comedies. Take walks. Realize this is not the end of the world. Except for the inconvenience of not being able to "order in", it's not the worst autoimmune disease we could have. It's going to get better.

Hang in there. Both of you!


Looks like Gee Eff in Dee Cee and I were posting simultaneously :)

Edited by IrishHeart, 09 December 2012 - 05:49 AM.

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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
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#27 Celiac Mindwarp

 
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Posted 09 December 2012 - 08:10 AM

I'd say I have been through some angry depressed sad frustrated times in the last few months too.

A bit of venting sounds pretty normal. As long as it is not aimed at you, and you are not in fear. I threw some stuff too when I had the house to myself (non breakable though, didn't have the energy to clear up).

I'm not sure if I am reading it right but it sounds like both of you might have a bit of cabin fever. Getting out for walks sounds very beneficial.

I wonder if there is a local celiac group you could contact? Do you have more friends you could invite round or go to and take you own food? It is an easy does it thing but there may come a point when a bit of gentle company can help life feel a bit normal again. Maybe a movie one afternoon for the two of you.

He would of course be very welcome to come here and chat too :)

I am really glad you are coming here for support. I think lots of us become a bit self obsessed while we get to grips with diagnosis and the new way of life... ( or is that just me??)
  • 0
- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

#28 Katty

 
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Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:24 PM

Hi all :) We’ve been getting out of the house a lot more lately and it’s helping us. Well, at least, it was. Over the past four days, my Husband and I have been very sick. Both of us. Same issues. BM problems, constant icky feeling in bellies, stirred up after every meal. I’ve been getting very bad gas cramping for the first time ever and several foods make me vomit.

We have a doctor’s appointment in two days to see what’s up. It shouldn’t be food -- I only buy fresh fruits, vegetables and meats, all organic, and we’re using all new cookware/plates etc. I have a new wooden butcher’s block that I use. My mother thinks we’re getting sick from the wooden block, because they harbor bacteria. I don’t really agree, I’ve always used wooden cutting boards. Cleaned with vinegar and lemon and sometimes salt.

We’re practically fighting over our bathroom, when one of us is finished, the other one is in there (sorry, graphic,). We just switch from being curled up in bed to in the bathroom. Walking makes me feel woozy and it’s a miracle I’ve been able to cook for us.

Our diet is basically all bone-broth soup right now in my feeble attempt to fix whatever I’ve messed up. I hope this is some sort of final gluten withdrawal. Shorter than usual post because I feel very ill. Not really any specific questions, I just want to know if this is normal.

On a side note, my cravings for gluten food (and gluten-free substitute baked goods) have all but diminished. And that’s a good thing. I haven’t craved brownies/cookies/bad stuff until I wrote this sentence, actually!
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We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us. ~ Joseph Campbell

#29 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:04 AM

Wow Katty, I'm surprised this stomach/bathroom thing is happening to you. Not surprised at your hubs --- he's the one with the dx --- but you, now that's not something that usually happens (I've never heard of it happening) with non celiacs or non celiac gluten intolerents when they remove gluten from their diet. So this leaves us with 2 possibilities..... either you both picked up some kind of bug OR surprise, surprise YOU have a problem with gluten & never knew it. There ARE such things as SILENT CELIACS who have absolutely no symptoms at all yet are most assuredly celiac. We have a few members like that. One in particular found out she was celiac only b/c her sister had problems, got tested & came up positive. It was recommended that all her immediate family members get tested. Soooo, our gal got tested --- positive blood ---- endoscopy showed total villous atrophy; WAY worse than her sister! Go figure!

Maybe someone else can come up with a reason this is happening to both of you.
  • 0

Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 


#30 Celiac Mindwarp

 
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Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:16 AM

Hmmm, sounds more like a bug, especially if you both got it at the same time.

It is possible that you also have some kind of gluten issue as well though.

Glad you were both enjoying getting out, hopefully you will both be feeling better soon.
  • 0
- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image




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