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Help With Rotation Diet And Food Sensitivities
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Hi

For the past few years i have been experiencing a bunch of chronic immune type symptoms (dry sinus, foggy brain, eczema, rashes, nausea, fatigue and more). I initially went to an allergy doc and got skin tested and it came back false. Through lots of experimentation and self-testing, I finally came to the conclusion it was food sensitivities (delayed food allergies) that was causing my problems. So I went ahead and cut out the foods I was reacting to (wheat, dairy, oats), and initially I felt amazing, all symptoms receding. But than after a week or so the symptoms slowly came back. Eventually I realized I was growing an intolerance to any food I was eating frequently. So I decided to start a rotation diet, and I have been doing it for a few weeks now, but Im getting mixed results. Im worried that im not doing it correctly.

When doing the rotation diet, do I eat the foods once on the allowed day or multiple times throughout the allowed day?

Currently I have been eating each food multiple times on the allowed day, but im worried perhaps Ive now grown sensitivities to those foods.

I am so confused and down at this point. Any help is really appreciated.

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Well, I have leaky gut and since I had to take away gluten from my diet, I became intolerant to a bunch of other stuff because I would have them too much. So here's what I do: I label foods as "highly tolerable", "tolerables I need" and "not very tolerable". The highly tolerables are foods I know I can have them everyday such as eggs, juice, fruit. I only eat an egg a day because more than that would be too much cholesterol for me to handle, but juice and fruit are unlimited.

The tolerables I need are meat, potatoes and a few more... These items are things I can tolerate well, though I don't have them too much because my diet without them would become too poor. So I tend to have the same kind of meat two days a week maximum, and I only eat two kinds of potatoes, allowing them three times a week. In this case, in the day they are allowed, I have two portions, oneat lunch and one at dinner.

The not very tolerables are things I enjoy eating, but I know I can't eat too much of them or my stomach will go upset. My soy-based chocolate, dried bananas, and nuts. Then, it depends how much I can tolerate them: the soy-based chocolate I can have four bars at week (100g) without a problem, though I don't eat them unless I have to be away from home for too long. The nuts, I use their flour to make baked goodies or butter, two times a month. Dried bananas, I can have one daily, but unlike the eggs, if I eat them two weeks in a row I get bloated.

So basically, the highly tolerables are the ones I manage daily, the tolerables I need are the ones I manage weekly and the not very tolerables I manage them monthly (or only eat them in emergencies).

It works, but you have to figure out how much you can tolerate each item you eat. Also, keep in mind to try items you became sensitive to if you haven't had them for a couple of months or so...

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Thanks for the advice. I think Im gonna cut out or severely limit my grains (buckwheat, millet) as I feel i may be super sensitive to grains. Its just so tricky, as I feel like im constantly stepping on my own toes, and any time I have a setback to puts me away for a good week.

Has anybody here had any success with an IGG intolerance test? I am considering it, but it is very expensive and is clouded by scientific controversy.

Interestingly most my symptoms are immune based and not really any digestion issues like many here seems to experience.

Well, I have leaky gut and since I had to take away gluten from my diet, I became intolerant to a bunch of other stuff because I would have them too much. So here's what I do: I label foods as "highly tolerable", "tolerables I need" and "not very tolerable". The highly tolerables are foods I know I can have them everyday such as eggs, juice, fruit. I only eat an egg a day because more than that would be too much cholesterol for me to handle, but juice and fruit are unlimited.

The tolerables I need are meat, potatoes and a few more... These items are things I can tolerate well, though I don't have them too much because my diet without them would become too poor. So I tend to have the same kind of meat two days a week maximum, and I only eat two kinds of potatoes, allowing them three times a week. In this case, in the day they are allowed, I have two portions, oneat lunch and one at dinner.

The not very tolerables are things I enjoy eating, but I know I can't eat too much of them or my stomach will go upset. My soy-based chocolate, dried bananas, and nuts. Then, it depends how much I can tolerate them: the soy-based chocolate I can have four bars at week (100g) without a problem, though I don't eat them unless I have to be away from home for too long. The nuts, I use their flour to make baked goodies or butter, two times a month. Dried bananas, I can have one daily, but unlike the eggs, if I eat them two weeks in a row I get bloated.

So basically, the highly tolerables are the ones I manage daily, the tolerables I need are the ones I manage weekly and the not very tolerables I manage them monthly (or only eat them in emergencies).

It works, but you have to figure out how much you can tolerate each item you eat. Also, keep in mind to try items you became sensitive to if you haven't had them for a couple of months or so...

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When I first cut out bread and cheerios after my diagnosis I felt great too. Later I started experiencing symptoms again. I found out that it isn't uncommon to seem to become sensitive to lower levels of gluten after the diet has been started. I needed to learn more about the diet and where gluten can be found. After I got better at eliminating all gluten, my symptoms again went away.

It might not be other intolerances, it might be that you need to learn more about the gluten free diet and avoiding cross contamination.

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When I first cut out bread and cheerios after my diagnosis I felt great too. Later I started experiencing symptoms again. I found out that it isn't uncommon to seem to become sensitive to lower levels of gluten after the diet has been started. I needed to learn more about the diet and where gluten can be found. After I got better at eliminating all gluten, my symptoms again went away.

It might not be other intolerance's, it might be that you need to learn more about the gluten free diet and avoiding cross contamination.

I don't believe that's my issue. I eat only whole foods (fruits, vegies, meats, grains) with practically no condiments. Its quite clear when I grow an intolerance to a new food, as my body reacts very harshly, and once I remove that food all the symptoms subside, that is until I grow a new intolerance..

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Slight update:

Since I started the rotation diet I have been keeping a log of all my meals for every day, as well as any corresponding symptoms on that day or the next. Because of this I was able to pinpoint the cause for my latest flare-ups, and remove it from my diet. The culprit turned out to be green-peas, which is a food I was eating frequently (prior to starting the rotation diet). This proves the point, that in sensitive people it is possible to develop a sensitivy/allergy to practically any food if over-exposed to it.

Since cutting it out, I have been seeing my symptoms continue to reduce, and I have begun taking some supplements to further the healing process. (glutamine, zinc).

If you are dealing with a similar situation, I highly recommend keeping a food log which you can always go back to to find offending foods and notice repeating patterns.

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Could it be legumes in general? You might want to keep that in mind.

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Could it be legumes in general? You might want to keep that in mind.

Its unlikely, considering I have discovered allergies/sensitivities to a wide variety of unrelated foods (broccoli, salmon, spinach & more). The only shared commonality between them being, they are all foods I have been over-exposed to (eaten multiple times a day, multiple days in a row) in the recent past.

It does seem most the foods Ive become intolerant to are protein-heavy, which would make sense considering an allergic (immune based) response is made against food proteins.

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On a slightly off-hand note, I have come across a great book called "alternative approach to allergies" by "Dr Theron Randolph", which deals with delayed foods allergies/food sensitivities and rotation diets. Here is a little tidbit from it which relates very strongly to my situation:

allergy.png

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That's basically what I do. Rotating things doesn't make me intolerant to anything and in the end, I am able to add some foods back in.

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Very interesting. How long are you supposed to wait before eating the food again, when doing the rotational/diversified diet?

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Very interesting. How long are you supposed to wait before eating the food again, when doing the rotational/diversified diet?

Generally speaking you do a 4 day rotation diet. Meaning, if you eat a food on sunday you dont eat it again until thursday.

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I have just found out that my mum basically had to rotation-wean me :ph34r: she had to rotate infant formulas, milk, et cetera, reason why she keeps saying I should do a rotation diet. I could not drink milk as a baby, but it doesn't bother me now. But apparently, my body just cannot have too much of anything.

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I do it a bit differently: I tend to have foods only a few times (three times maximum) a week. I could spend two days eating potatoes at dinner and at lunch, but then I would have to wait five days to eat potatoes again (when a new week starts). But that's because I can hardly eat anything. Apparently I have to go grain, nuts and seed free. I don't have a lot of variety of foods to wait four days before eating certain food again.

Though limiting the times I am allowed to eat them sure has worked.

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