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Not Trying Enough New Foods...scared Of Allergies..


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64 replies to this topic

#46 shadowicewolf

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:07 AM

there are no tests for intolerences as far as i know outside of removing them completely from your diet than readding them later.
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#47 123glldd

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:08 AM

Wouldn't it also be possible my reaction could have simply been a product off too much spice? Peppers were in the bruschetta...we were having cilantro chutney all the time..that had peppers..then the paprika....perhaps a healing bowel just couldn't handle the spice and it wasn't tomatoes at all? I find ketchup to have a hell of a lot of zing too. Tart. But does that rule out whole tomatoes?
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#48 mushroom

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:14 AM

Peppers and paprika are both in the nightshade family and therefore closely related to tomato. I know tomato is a hard one to avoid, but try it for a week (and the other nightshades - potato, eggplant) and see how you go. With food intolerlances, almost anything is possible, and it is a trial and error kind of thing. We can talk about it all day, but unless you experiment you are not going to be able to find the culprit(s). :)
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#49 123glldd

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:20 PM

The only nightshade i've been eating since august is potato in ore ida fries...sooo...I have avoided the rest. And I never eat eggplant. My onlly point being since the other things were spicey type foods isn't it possible it's not necessarily a nightshade issue but a spicey issue? I'm just throwing it out there as a possibility. I've had zero issues with potato. The rest i haven't touched an ounce of it. Aside from those amys meals for about a month after the incident.
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#50 123glldd

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:22 PM

I'm not having illness issue now so i'm not sure how avoiding anything for a week is going to help i guess is what i'm saying..i've been avoiding the rest for months.
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#51 JNBunnie1

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:46 PM

Krista, I think at this point you really just have to make a list of all the things you suspect could
be your problem, remove them ALL, and then after a few weeks add one back at a time. This
is the definition of an elimination diet.

Like other posters have said, have a plan for when you add a food back. Make sure another adult is
around for if any issues arise, make sure it's a day off of work. I understand that you have a phobia
of illness, and I totally understand, as one of my Celiac symptoms was horrendous, unrelenting
nausea. But you won't solve anything by 'wondering' about it. Every single thing you have asked,
whether it's spices, tomatoes, nightshades, salicylates, all of that is POSSIBLE, but truly just does
not sound likely. The reaction you described was really quite mild in the grand scheme of things. It's
POSSIBLE that your body just didn't like the Schar crust. It may have some preservative in it that
doesn't agree with you.

I'm going to second Tiffany's suggestion and ask if you might want to get some professional assistance
with your phobia of illness, because it seems like it's really a problem for you. I hope something like
that could help, because you sound really unhappy with it.
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If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#52 123glldd

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:04 PM

I guess what I'm not clear on is...is the above poster suggesting stopping the fries for a week then bringing it back and seeing what happens? Because everything else i haven't been touching.
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#53 mushroom

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:14 PM

If nothing has been bothering you at all for a week, then yes, this is the perfect scenario. it is time to find out what does bother you. Pick a new food that you think will not bother you. If you are fine with that one for a week then try another. Keep a diary of when you try things and what reaction you have, if any. That way you can tell when to test that food again, and see if the reaction is the same.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#54 123glldd

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:38 PM

So should I give up the potato for a week even though I seem fine with it? I tried sweet potato last night and intend to eat a bit every day to be sure for maybe 3 days then move on to turnip greens.
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#55 JNBunnie1

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:40 PM

So should I give up the potato for a week even though I seem fine with it? I tried sweet potato last night and intend to eat a bit every day to be sure for maybe 3 days then move on to turnip greens.


No, Neroli's point was that you have been feeling fine, and have not been having any
problems, therefore, you have reached what we'll call the 'base point' of an elimination
diet. Right now, nothing is bothering you. Yay! Now is the time to start ADDING things.
Slowly, one at a time. And not every 3 days- only one a week. You want to give yourself
plenty of time to observe any reactions.
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If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#56 bartfull

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:43 PM

If sals are a problem for you, you DO know that tomatoes are very high sals, right? And sals build up in your system so you can eat something once, twice, and maybe the third time you will have reached your tipping point and it will make you sick.

I eat broccoli a lot too, and I eat sweet potatoes almost every day. It's the only way I can get enough vitamins because I really don't think they make a multi that I can take.

So I eat a small amount of sweet potato every day and broccoli about three times a week. Then I eat pistachios, but if I eat more than 10 or 12, I get sick. I have found my tipping point. If there is a high sals food that I can't resist anymore, I eat white potatoes instead of sweet potatoes, cauliflower instead of broccoli, and walnuts instead of pistachios for a while. After my system is clear, I can eat some of the high sals food I have been craving.

That warning you read about anaphylactic shock is a bit extreme IMO. Aspirin, yes, but not the foods. Aspirin has like 100 times more sals than the high sals foods. I'll never touch it again, but the foods - when I get "sick" from too many sals it consists of a psoriasis flare and that terrible jaw pain. I don't even get sick to my stomach. It seems only gluten itself does that to me.

Of course we are all different, but I think even if sals are your problem, you can tolerate some. You just need to find your tipping point, and the only way to do that is by eating the sals foods you already eat, then try adding one higher sals serving a week. If that doesn't get you, try two. If that doesn't get you, try more. When you finally have a reaction, take a break from anything high or very high, to clear your system, then you will know - however many times a week you were able to tolerate a food, that's your tipping point.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#57 123glldd

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:03 PM

I really would like to know if i have an aspirin allergy i have to say because my husbands aunt who is also celiac said that means you can't even have motrin etc. It would be really nice to know if i actually have an allergy to that is there a test?
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#58 bartfull

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 04:22 PM

I don't know if there is a test or not. I imagine you could google it or ask your doctor. But I DO know that I can't take ibuprofen or naproxin. (Advil, Motrin, or Aleve.) I don't get an allergic reaction, but my prosiasis flares like fire, and my jaw gets unbelievably bad. All I can take is Tylenol.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#59 foam

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:35 PM

I would be surprised if anyone has much more allergens and higher IgE antibody levels than I do at the moment and I can eat peanuts, all kinds of nuts infact and any other food I feel like, all it does is raise my immune system to a higher state and release more eosonphil cells that ruin my gut further but I've never reached a state of shock or anything like that from eating a food, nothing worse than cramps and sitting on the toilet for a while while wont calm down. With Celiac type disorders you are just fighting against a worn out gut and having an immune response to protiens that are being seen by the immune system undigested and mistaken as something bad (parasite etc). It's not more complicated than that. It's not the same deal as people that are especailly sensitive to a bee sting or a peanut.. My levels IgE levels are over 4000 not because I'll drop dead if I see one allergen, they are that high because I'm intollerent to 100 things because of the damaged digestive system
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#60 Juliebove

 
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Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:42 AM

there are no tests for intolerences as far as i know outside of removing them completely from your diet than readding them later.


Yes there are. But getting someone to do them can be tough and expensive. My mom, daughter and I all had the IgG food allergy (intolerance) tests done at two different naturopaths. I didn't like the one. Not only did he charge ove $2,000 for the testing but he also insisted that we buy some very expensive supplements from him, all of which we could buy for a lot less online. But he insisted that my daughter take some stuff that is for Alzheimers. And she was 6 at the time!

The other naturopath is deceased now. And the one that we currently see doesn't believe in IgG allergies.

More recently we had hair testing done. I found it online. Some people believe it is all a bunch of hooey but it really did help us a lot. Turns out we were both intolerant to a lot of herbs and spices and she is intolerant to flax. When she was on the gluten-free diet she was eating a lot of flax. I accidentally bought her a sandwich on Udi's bread the other day that had flax in it. I don't know that it was the bread itself that had the flax. But the tuna sandwich did. I was in a hurry when I bought it and didn't notice the flax until I got it home. I told her she could try it if she wanted to. They do tell you unless you have an actual allergy to whatever the food is to try it and see what your reaction is. Hers was wanting to vomit. So... No more of that.

The amazing thing for me was that after changing my diet, I haven't been sick at all with whatever is going around like colds or the flu. and I used to be sick almost all the time!
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