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Different Types Of Gluten Free Foods?!


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#1 adambryant

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:06 PM

Does anyone have any alternatives to gluten free bread? Also different foods that don't include potatoes, rice etc as I'm struggling to think what to eat! It gets very repetitive! Thankyou!
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#2 shadowicewolf

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 06:29 PM

Corn tortillas? Its what i use. There are also rice ones, but i've never had them.

Its not too difficult. I mainly, for example, eat soups most of the time. Take the meat, brown it till ya got a good crust, add water, simmer for 2-3 hours, add whatever veggie and seasonings you like.
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#3 SensitiveMe

 
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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:25 PM

Orgran has a line of what they call Crispibreads which are glutenfree. They are really crispy though, more like a long cracker. They are made in Australia and I get them at my local health food store here in NY. I mostly eat the Orgran Buckwheat Crispibread and I will put almond butter or tuna on it. I don't remember the other types of them but I think rice, corn and quinoa crispibread.

For different foods I mostly eat quinoa.
The quinoa flakes as a hot cereal and put maple syrup in it. It is quick and convenient and I usually make it in the microwave instead of on the stovetop in a pot. Or for an alternative hot cereal there is Cream of Buckwheat.

Then there is the regular quinoa which unlike the flakes needs to be rinsed first. But it only takes 15 minutes to cook on the stove in a pan and you can store it in the refrigerator for a week and add a little water to it when you want it and heat it in the microwave. I have it for dinner quite often and put a little butter and salt on it. It has a very mild taste. Sometimes I put shrimp or a piece of halibut over it and add toasted sesame oil. I use the white quinoa but they also make red and black which I think take a bit longer to cook, are crunchier and with a bit more flavor. You can also make Tabouleh Salad with cooked quinoa but I haven't tried that yet.

Another alternative is Kasha which is roasted buckwheat groats. You cook them on the stove adding water or broth, butter and salt. You stir the kasha over high heat for 2 to 3 minutes until it is hot and slightly toasted, then reduce heat to low and stir in the boiling water or broth, and butter and salt and cover and simmer for 10 to 12 minutes until kasha is tender and liquid is absorbed.
You can also make kasha pilaf by adding in sauted onions, mushrooms or other chopped vegetables and then cooking it as above.
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#4 adambryant

 
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Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:04 AM

Thanks ill definitley try some of that!
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