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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

8 Months!
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17 posts in this topic

I am now gluten free for 8 months as of this December and have NEVER felt better. I went to my doctors to get all of my labs we done to see if I am actually improving inside along with just feeling improved and all of my levels were NORMAL and great! Even my vitamin D, which was only at 17 right before I was diagnosed.

I only have one problem now. I still have my migraines, and they just keep getting worse. I have done all of the elimination diets, and I have figured out all of my triggers. My triggers seem to change as well though. I have gone through a few preventative meds, all of which have failed. We have now started Verapimil as my preventative, and we have upped the dosage a few times and it is finally starting to make a difference. They are pretty sure that I have chronic migraines and the type of chronic migraines I have are different than most. They are called transfer migraines, so that means i have multiple triggers, and my triggers can change and I can develop more triggers throughout my life. Yay! :P I had an MRI today, so we hope maybe that will provide even more answers as to where they may be forming and if there could be any other causes, just in case the CT scans have missed anything.

I am just SO very thankful for finally getting to the bottom of EVERYTHING that is wrong with me. Although the Celiac diagnoses is a bummer for going out and what not since I am only 25, it's just simply amazing that I feel this great. Growing up all of my life, I always thought constantly being sick and feeling miserable and being in pain were just normal and that everyone must feel that way. This is the first time in my whole life I have ever felt like a normal human being and I'm getting better each and every day!

I just thought I would post this to maybe lift people's spirits up. I know it can be hard, but there IS hope out there! It took a while after going gluten-free that I finally started to really feel the changes and feeling better. And oh boy, what a good vitamin compound will do for you. That also makes a big impact on how I feel. I take Celiact plus an additional 2,000 units of D3. It really makes all the difference, I can always tell when I have forgotten my vitamins. Well worth it.

Sorry I'm rambling! I hope this post can help those struggling with being newly diagnosed, and those who have had it for a long time and are just having a bummer of a day.

xo

-Kristen

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THAT is wonderful, kristen! and it's awesome of you to be encouraging - it *is* a big deal some days and especially overwhelming for people who are newly diagnosed. and yay for you getting diagnosed at an early age - you might as well be healthy and enjoy your youth! and much better if you are going to have kids.

my daughter (non-celiac) used to get "cluster" headaches similar to migraines - they told her they were caused by stress. she got rid of her ex-husband and they went away hahaha :D i get a (nothing like i used to get) headache sometimes around my pms/punctuation week.

thanx so much for this positive posting and have a great day! :)

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Thanks doll! I've had migraines since I was 5 years old. Guess I am just one of the lucky ones :P

Although I was diagnosed younger, I've had the disease for well over 10 years, been suffering from all the them symptoms sine I was at least 15, but yes, at least it will only take like 3-5 years to fully heal than 10+ like it could have been.

I figure it's nice for others to hear that even though it is difficult (especially during the holidays), that there really is/can be a light at the end of the tunnel. :)

And even though last night I was glutened and feel like epic hell right now, I know it will pass and I will be right back to feeling good in a few days :D

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Great to hear 3 months in, thank you :)

Sorry to hear you got got, hope it improves soon.

Wish I could help on the migraines, mine are down to 1 a month since gluten-free. I had to cut out corn sesame coffee too and added B12. They got worse while I was eating lots of(junk type) gluten-free food, and with too much sugar. Stress is killer for me too, and bad posture.

Sending happy thoughts

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If I only got the tummy problems I could manage okay, but I get the horrible neuropathy, tons of canker sores for weeks, and body aches, along with it just making me so tired I can't function. Thankfully I have no kids yet and trying to find a job at the moment. The Celiact has all the vitamin and enzymes you need along with probiotics as well. I have found that when I'm glutened while on the Celiact, my reaction is far more manageable (haven't been to the hospital because of glutening for months since taking it).

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I'm lucky mine is usually only about 5 days. Great the Celiact is helping.

Good luck with job hunting. I am avoiding it until my youngest is a school neyt year. No idea what to do then! My own business or something flexible with a sympathetic boss I guess...

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Hi I was undiagnosed for nearly 10 years and have now been gluten-free for two years. I know exactly how you feel, it's as though you have been given your life back. I'm so sorry you still get Migraines mine were killing me but they are gone now unless I get glutenated. Honestly I firmly believed I would die soon before I was diagnosed it was that bad. I'm 38 now and have given myself the goal to try to live to see 112. ;) I gotta live extra long to make up for those 10 years you know.

With my migraines it took two triggers one of them was gluten which sadly before being diagnosed was always present. Another trigger for me is the barometric pressure. Everyone who knew me could just take one look at me and know if it was going to rain. :( You could watch me go downhill as a storm headed my way. Even worked with snowstorms. Now anytime I'm surprised by a storm I'm reminded how much I've improved over the past two years.

To me finding out I was Celiac was like opening a magic treasure chest that fixed everything. Maybe you will find a second magic treasure chest? If I could will it into being for you I would. (((HUGS)))

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Yup, found that "treasure chest" for my migraines. I have a large brain tumor actually. We don't know much right now. Won't know anything more until after the 26th....

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Yup, found that "treasure chest" for my migraines. I have a large brain tumor actually. We don't know much right now. Won't know anything more until after the 26th....

Oh no!! How awful to hear this.... sending (((hugs))) :(

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Sending some prayers your way Kristen. ((((Hugs))) too. May the Lord have mercy upon you, in Jesus name, Amen. :)

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Thanks guys :)

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o kristen i'm so sorry! praying you will have good news. it could happen - a friend of mine actually had one the size of a softball and they operated and removed it and he is still kicking. that was 25 years ago, too, so surely they have gotten better at it. xxoo kiddo

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We have a bit more information. The tumor is NOT cancerous. It's about the size of my pituitary gland and it is in the back of the gland, so it's not messing with my optic or my sinuses, which is a good thing, but in a way, a bit bitter sweet, since now instead of the surgery option being easy and through my nose, they will have to go in through my skull more than likely. We do not know my treatment methods yet, but it's more than likely going to be brain surgery.

So, at least that's a bit of good news before Xmas :)

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"Bittersweet," yes - it always helps to finally get medical validation for the reason you're feeling bad, but not in the "never expected this" department. :(

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I'm so glad glad part of the news is very good -- the 'it's not cancer, not messing with the optic' nerve part.

Now I will wish you the best on the treatment... I also have a friend who had brain surgery for a nonmalignant tumor (very large one) 20 years ago when she was 50 and she hasn't mssed a beat since, so I hope yours goes even better.

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when brain surgery is the good news! man. you just never know what life is gonna throw at you.. you have a good positive attitude, sweetie, that will certainly help you through :) keep us posted and i will keep you in my prayers :)

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Since the tumor seems to be in the back of my pituitary, the neurologist can't do much since "technically" it's not IN my brain. So I talk to an endocrinologist about what other tests she wants me to do, to see if it's "active" or not, (messing with my hormones and/or secreting them), and then from there, we will hopefully start having a treatment plan in place. Been in and out of the ER from migraines and sever nausea over the holidays and these last few days. Trying to hang in there. Thanks to you all for the well wishes :)

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    • does your diet have to be like a perfection?
      Yes.  You have to be 100% gluten abstinent when you have Celiac Disorder.  It gets easier to be gluten abstinent, not because you get used to it but because of the negative effects that ingesting gluten causes when you accidentally eat something with gluten.  Nothing tastes good enough to go through a glutening.  As your system heals it will become less tolerant of your occasional lapses into gluten consumption--accidental or otherwise. You have to take this seriously.  You get used to it and there are some wonderful gluten-free options out there.  But you can't go back to gluten and stay healthy.  It just doesn't work that way. Good luck.
    • does your diet have to be like a perfection?
      I  think you need to watch where you get your medical info!    Of course you can't introduce gluten back in. And  of course you have to be strictly gluten-free and not intentionally eat gluten.   "The gluten-free diet is a lifetime requirement. Eating any gluten, no matter how small an amount, can damage your intestine. This is true for anyone with the disease, including people who do not have noticeable symptoms. It can take weeks for antibody levels (indicating intestinal damage) to normalize after a person with celiac disease has consumed gluten. Depending on a person’s age at diagnosis, some problems, such as delayed growth and tooth discoloration, may not improve. The gluten-free diet requires a completely new approach to eating. You have to be extremely careful about what you buy for lunch at school or work, eat at cocktail parties, or grab from the refrigerator for a midnight snack. Eating out and traveling can be challenging as you learn to scrutinize menus for foods with gluten, question the waiter or chef about possible hidden sources of gluten, and search for safe options at airports or on the road. However, with practice, identifying potential sources of gluten becomes second nature and you’ll learn to recognize which foods are safe and which are off limits." http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/treatment    
    • does your diet have to be like a perfection?
      FlowerQueen is correct.  Once diagnosed with celiac disease, you should never consume gluten again without the risk of becoming very ill (osteoporosis, liver damage, lymphoma, etc.).   I think everyone has trouble in the beginning sticking to a gluten free diet.  That's because gluten is in so many processed foods.  It takes time to learn to read labels, make a safe kitchen, learn to eat out, get your family to support you.  I would advise reading out Newbie 101 section under "Coping" within this forum.  It contains valuable tips for becoming gluten free.  Also, check out the University of Chicago's celiac website to learn about celiac disease.  Knowledge is power!   Everyone has different degrees of damage, but I would say that learning the diet and healing can take months to a year or longer.  The good news is that this is an autoimmune disorder that is treatable -- avoid gluten at all costs!   Take care and welcome to the forum!   
    • does your diet have to be like a perfection?
      Not sure what you mean by perfecting your diet? Do you mean accidentally eating gluten?   As to re-introducing gluten again, if you have celiac disease, please DO NOT ever re-introduce gluten again. It's an auto-immune disease, not a food intolerance. It will damage your gut again if you do.  Hope this helps.
    • 3 months gluten-free still feeling cramps
      First of all, your doctor does not seem to be celiac savvy.  It is so easy for a GI doctor to miss patches of intestinal damage on an endoscopy because the small intestinal wall, if spread out is the size of a tennis court!   How many samples were taken and submitted to a pathologist?  A visual look from the GI often results in nothing!  For example, my endoscopy visual was recorded as normal.  But my biopsies revealed moderate to severe intestinal villi damage (Marsh Stage IIIB).  GI's are supposed to take four to six tissue samples.  I would suggest getting copies of all your lab/procedure reports.  Don't trust me.  Here's the research: http://gi.org/guideline/diagnosis-and-management-of-celiac-disease/ http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/diagnosis Next, three months of eating gluten free is not very long.  The reality is that there is a steep learning curve to going gluten free.  You can get "glutened" by kissing someone who just consumed gluten.  You can get it from a shared toaster, coated frying pan, wooden spoon, etc.  Gluten can be hidden in prescription medications, etc.  Do you EVER eat out?   I can tell you that it took me a year to feel pretty good and another to feel really normal!  My learning curve was not so steep since my hubby had been gluten-free for 12 years prior to my diagnosis, so I knew the drill.   You could have something else besides celiac disease.  Like SIBO, Crohn's, etc.  You might consider going back to your GI for another celiac antibodies test to see if you are diet compliant  before looking into other illnesses.   You could have developed intolerances (lactose is a huge one).  These can be identified by keeping a food diary.  They develop because your gut has been damaged (or is continuing to be damaged by gluten).  You might consider digestive enzymes (use certified gluten-free ones) and stick to whole well-cooked foods (including fruit) for a month or so.  I can tell you that I could not eat eggs for years.  Now I eat them daily.  Same for hard-to-digest things like nuts and crunchy fresh veggies!   Check out our Newbie 101 section pinned under the "Coping" section of this forum.  Review it to be sure you really are gluten free.  Then give yourself some time to heal.   I hope you feel better soon! 
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