Jump to content





   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Get The 'shivers'


  • Please log in to reply

8 replies to this topic

#1 jmrogers31

 
jmrogers31

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 74 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 07:19 AM

2 questions for everyone. My 6 year old daughter is on a gluten free trial right now that we started 3 weeks ago. My first question is that she was having behavioral issues in school with talking, not paying attention, very anxious, and arguing. Each day they can have an outstanding day, great day, good day, think about it day, or parent contact. She has had 1 outstanding day in 3 months and many parent contact and think about it days. The teacher thought she may have ADHD and we were considering seeing someone about that. I am diagnosed gluten intolerant and told my wife we should try gluten free first. Well in the last 3 weeks she has had many outstanding days including 3 of the last 4, she is less anxious at home and listens much better. How many of you noticed a sharp contrast in behavior with your children? My other question is that she shared a snack with a friend at school the other day and I got a call from school saying she had a fever and the chills or 'shivers' as my daughter called them. I told the nurse about her food trial she was on and this was the first time in over 2 weeks she had ate gluten and she didn't think gluten could cause a fever and chills. Anyone have experience that it can? Thanks.
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,171 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:15 AM

In my own opionion ADHD can be diet related. Feed her good food. My brother had some problems with it when I was young. Mom helped him by using Dr. Ben Feingold's diet. His book gives details of eliminating food colorings and artificial flavorings. I was amazing how these additives (or rather eliminating them) changed my brother's behaviour. Maybe homeschooling might be a thought for her.

I have the chils occassionally, but I have never associated them with gluten. I will have to note it later if I do.

Diana
  • 0

#3 Jestation

 
Jestation

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:31 AM

2 questions for everyone. My 6 year old daughter is on a gluten free trial right now that we started 3 weeks ago. My first question is that she was having behavioral issues in school with talking, not paying attention, very anxious, and arguing. Each day they can have an outstanding day, great day, good day, think about it day, or parent contact. She has had 1 outstanding day in 3 months and many parent contact and think about it days. The teacher thought she may have ADHD and we were considering seeing someone about that. I am diagnosed gluten intolerant and told my wife we should try gluten free first. Well in the last 3 weeks she has had many outstanding days including 3 of the last 4, she is less anxious at home and listens much better. How many of you noticed a sharp contrast in behavior with your children? My other question is that she shared a snack with a friend at school the other day and I got a call from school saying she had a fever and the chills or 'shivers' as my daughter called them. I told the nurse about her food trial she was on and this was the first time in over 2 weeks she had ate gluten and she didn't think gluten could cause a fever and chills. Anyone have experience that it can? Thanks.


Hi, I sometimes get flu-like symptoms, swolen glands, achy, tired and a bit feverish if I accidentally ingest gluten. I think it's an immune response, the body trying to fight the initial invasion. Hope this helps!
  • 0

#4 nvsmom

 
nvsmom

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,352 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:31 AM

I would guess the fever and snack were a coincidence. I have never had a feverish feeling from gluten (although I have during an autoimmune attack of another sort). My guess is that she has a virus. Either way, I hope she feels better soon.

We homeschool our three boys and find it is a great alternative to regular school for bright kids who have a hard time sitting still and shutting up.... that would be really tough for my kids! LOL
  • 0
Nicole Posted Image

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993
Celiac - June, 2012
Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#5 shadowicewolf

 
shadowicewolf

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,758 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:56 AM

When i was younger, I very rarely had good days (the system of green (good) yellow (could be better) and red (bad) is what my class used). I was always on yellow and on a rare occasion red. I have a dx of ADHD. The diet has helped some, i can sit still and pay attention a bit better than before, but there are still issues (like i can't concentrate on one thing at a time). For example, right now i've got the tv going, the computer, and i'm bouncing my leg. I cannot sit still for very long. Classes with swivle chairs are interesting as i tend to bounce about in them.

I say virus for the fever.
  • 1

#6 jmrogers31

 
jmrogers31

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 74 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 01:31 PM

Thanks everyone. nvsmom, it is interesting you said bright kids because she is a very bright kid (I know everyone thinks that about their kid). She actually gets in trouble during reading lessons because she just reads the words when the other kids are supposed to be sounding them out and we were told by her teacher that they don't have anyone to pair her with for reading because she is so far ahead of everyone. I don't think she is gifted because she is average in other subjects. We were considering seeing if she could move up a grade or two for reading because she reads at about a 3rd grade level in Kindergarten. I have heard about bright kids having trouble 'sitting still and shutting up' as you put it. shadowicewolf, that sounds like her. She can't sit still and focus. I can't either, but I was actually never in trouble because I was so incredibly and horribly shy as a kid that I never spoke to anyone unlike my daughter who talks to EVERYONE and wants all the attention. :) Jestation, thanks for sharing I will keep an open mind before I dismiss it. 1desperateladysaved, let's hope so because I am not going to medicate my child at 6 years old. I am hoping we can overcome this. My other daughter is a model student and we never have issues with her. You would never guess they were sisters, they look and act nothing alike.
  • 0

#7 shadowicewolf

 
shadowicewolf

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,758 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 02:07 PM

I'm glad to hear that she does well in school. I certainly didn't when i was younger (with the adhd stuff and not understanding the material). Does she like running about outside? Perhaps a sport or an after school club dedicated to such things might help (i was in one called the run/walk club where we would do fun games and stuff after school).
  • 0

#8 nvsmom

 
nvsmom

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,352 posts
 

Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:13 PM

Thanks everyone. nvsmom, it is interesting you said bright kids because she is a very bright kid (I know everyone thinks that about their kid). She actually gets in trouble during reading lessons because she just reads the words when the other kids are supposed to be sounding them out and we were told by her teacher that they don't have anyone to pair her with for reading because she is so far ahead of everyone. I don't think she is gifted because she is average in other subjects. We were considering seeing if she could move up a grade or two for reading because she reads at about a 3rd grade level in Kindergarten. I have heard about bright kids having trouble 'sitting still and shutting up' as you put it. shadowicewolf, that sounds like her. She can't sit still and focus. I can't either, but I was actually never in trouble because I was so incredibly and horribly shy as a kid that I never spoke to anyone unlike my daughter who talks to EVERYONE and wants all the attention. :) Jestation, thanks for sharing I will keep an open mind before I dismiss it. 1desperateladysaved, let's hope so because I am not going to medicate my child at 6 years old. I am hoping we can overcome this. My other daughter is a model student and we never have issues with her. You would never guess they were sisters, they look and act nothing alike.


Your daughter sounds gifted in reading if she is that far ahead. Not many kids are gifted in multiple areas but it sounds like reading is her thing. It would be nice if the teachers could give her grade three work, or use her skills to teach the other kids... it's tough on kids when teachers don't have the time or resources to advance kids in their gifted areas so they don't get bored and create a disruption.

We got into homeschooling because my oldest had a flare for language (vocabulary) and math and is a fair bit ahead of his peers in those areas. He also has several topics which he pursues passionately and in depth, but doesn't have patience for topics that don't interest him (he has mild Aspergers). For example, when he was in grade two we studied Greek and Roman ancient history and he fell in love with battle strategy and weapons; he could explain how many ancient battles went, why they happened... and what he would have done differently. If he had had to study "My Community" like the grade 2 public school curriculum, he would have been bored and become a classroom distraction. Conversely, he was weak in reading for a few years and he would have become frustrated trying to keep up to his peers when he wasn't ready for that material yet. For kids like my boys, homeschooling is best for them at this time. :)

BTW, my boys have been gluten-free for a couple of months now and I've noticed large behavourial changes for the better in my oldest and youngest boys. The have less stomach aches, and they are more pleasant and are better able to handle tasks that they don't enjoy. Yeah! None of my boys have actually tested positive for celiac disease though.
  • 0
Nicole Posted Image

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993
Celiac - June, 2012
Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#9 shadowicewolf

 
shadowicewolf

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,758 posts
 

Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:29 AM

We got into homeschooling because my oldest had a flare for language (vocabulary) and math and is a fair bit ahead of his peers in those areas. He also has several topics which he pursues passionately and in depth, but doesn't have patience for topics that don't interest him (he has mild Aspergers). For example, when he was in grade two we studied Greek and Roman ancient history and he fell in love with battle strategy and weapons; he could explain how many ancient battles went, why they happened... and what he would have done differently. If he had had to study "My Community" like the grade 2 public school curriculum, he would have been bored and become a classroom distraction. Conversely, he was weak in reading for a few years and he would have become frustrated trying to keep up to his peers when he wasn't ready for that material yet. For kids like my boys, homeschooling is best for them at this time. :)


I was like that (except for math...). I could tell ya how this that or the other happened, but give me something that was outside of it, forget it :lol:
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: