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How Long Would It Take To Feel Different/better?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 mars817

 
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Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:42 PM

I went gluten free 11 days ago. I'm feeling the same/worse possibly. I wonder how long it should take to feel better or at least a difference if gluten was my problem? I have had negative blood tests, inconclusive biopsy and a pill cam study that they said had nothing too concerning (whatever that means-they were looking for the source of my anemia), but I have a gene for celiac and my brother is a diagnosed celiac and I have so many symptoms.
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#2 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:39 PM

How long have you had symptoms?
What will you be willing to do in order to return to health? . CAn you continously pass by gluten foods inspite of social pressure?
Are you a smoker or do you drink heavily?
Will you take tests to discover which suppliments are necessary?
Are you willing to discover what other intolerances you have and avoid or minimize contact with them?
Do you have an excercise program, or are you willing to start one as you feel better?
Are you able to get some extra rest?
Are you willing to scrutinize each label on the food you buy? Some must even call companies and find out what products they use their equipment for.

I think the answer to these questions will help to decide how quickly you will heal. I can gage that if you have had symptoms for 30 years and had 5 nauseating pregnancies which nevertheless ended happily, you will be still trying to get better in 6 months. You will have some higher highs, but some awful lows too.

.

I hope you will be able to do all of the above things. Get better soon ****
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#3 GottaSki

 
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Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:40 PM

worse in the first month is common.

The honest answer to your question is days, weeks, months or years. We are all different.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#4 jcp

 
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Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:56 PM

We are definitely all different, and some of the differences might depend on if you're totally gluten free and how you've gone about making the changes. I ended up going almost low-carb at first because I found it hard to figure out what to eat, and that can definitely change how you feel in hurry.
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#5 GFinDC

 
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Posted 07 December 2012 - 06:33 AM

Hi Mars817,

You should plan to stay on the gluten-free diet for 3 months at least. 6 Months is a better test. It's not an instant cure, it takes time.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#6 nvsmom

 
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Posted 07 December 2012 - 08:52 AM

I personally noticed my stomach aches and headaches were much less within a couple of days but I went through a withdrawl of sorts so I felt extra tired and cranky. Overall, in the first two weeks I really didn't feel much better. After a month or two I really noticed a difference, especially in the gut... I no longer looked pregnant. lol. Now that I'm 6 months in, my improvements are definitely slowing down and becoming more subtle.

Hang in there. As the others said, many people need a few months to see improvements, but I hope you start feeling better soon.
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#7 mars817

 
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Posted 07 December 2012 - 08:57 AM

Ok I guess I had just seen a lot of, I stopped eatiing gluten this morning and I'm so much better. I think my tummy is a bit better but I still am having issues and running for the bathroom and wondering if it is something else or not.
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#8 GFinDC

 
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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:36 PM

Ok I guess I had just seen a lot of, I stopped eatiing gluten this morning and I'm so much better. I think my tummy is a bit better but I still am having issues and running for the bathroom and wondering if it is something else or not.


So you weren't really gluten free for 11 days? Every time you start eating gluten again you set yourself back some. It only takes a small amount of gluten to start a reaction by your body. The longer you stay gluten-free the less the cravings for it will be. It is harder to resist at first because we are used to eating it. But once you get out of the habit of eating gluten and get in the habit of eating other foods, it is easier. Or just plain easy.

There are lots of plain whole foods that taste great and are better for you than refined flour and carbohydrates and sugar. Plus the whole foods have better nutrients like vitamins and minerals in them that your body needs. Gluteny foods are loaded with vitamins to make them acceptable, because otherwise people would get weak and sick from eating them too much and not getting enough vitamins in their diets. They really aren't healthy foods by themselves. Imagine a bread maker grinding up a vitamin pill and putting it in your loaf of bread. That's basically what they do with wheat flour to make it worth while to eat instead of just empty calories. They call it "vitamin enriched flour". It's like enriching a pile of sand and telling people they should eat it because it's good for them to get all those added vitamins.

And other bad things about gluten can be imagined here smiley. :ph34r:

Get back in the wagon woman, and stay gluten-free for 3 to 6 months at least. That will give your body a chance to heal and start absorbing natural vitamins and minerals from real food. That's a good thing. :)

If you want to do a gluten challenge after 2 months or 3 months that is a better time to do it. By then you will have learned how to eat right and your body is starting to heal. And you can get clearer results from a gluten challenge. Many people want to do a gluten challenge to self diagnose, I see nothing wrong with that idea. If you feel bad eating gluten it doesn't matter a whole lot what you call the condition.

All this is meant to help you evaluate your own situation, I hope it helps..
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#9 mars817

 
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Posted 07 December 2012 - 02:51 PM

So you weren't really gluten free for 11 days? Every time you start eating gluten again you set yourself back some. It only takes a small amount of gluten to start a reaction by your body. The longer you stay gluten-free the less the cravings for it will be. It is harder to resist at first because we are used to eating it. But once you get out of the habit of eating gluten and get in the habit of eating other foods, it is easier. Or just plain easy.

There are lots of plain whole foods that taste great and are better for you than refined flour and carbohydrates and sugar. Plus the whole foods have better nutrients like vitamins and minerals in them that your body needs. Gluteny foods are loaded with vitamins to make them acceptable, because otherwise people would get weak and sick from eating them too much and not getting enough vitamins in their diets. They really aren't healthy foods by themselves. Imagine a bread maker grinding up a vitamin pill and putting it in your loaf of bread. That's basically what they do with wheat flour to make it worth while to eat instead of just empty calories. They call it "vitamin enriched flour". It's like enriching a pile of sand and telling people they should eat it because it's good for them to get all those added vitamins.

And other bad things about gluten can be imagined here smiley. :ph34r:

Get back in the wagon woman, and stay gluten-free for 3 to 6 months at least. That will give your body a chance to heal and start absorbing natural vitamins and minerals from real food. That's a good thing. :)

If you want to do a gluten challenge after 2 months or 3 months that is a better time to do it. By then you will have learned how to eat right and your body is starting to heal. And you can get clearer results from a gluten challenge. Many people want to do a gluten challenge to self diagnose, I see nothing wrong with that idea. If you feel bad eating gluten it doesn't matter a whole lot what you call the condition.

All this is meant to help you evaluate your own situation, I hope it helps..


I guess I didn't state it right. I have been off gluten for 12 days now. My very bad tummy problem had nothing to do with gluten that day at least. All I had was ice tea before they started. That why I wonder. I'm still staying gluten free I just wonder how long I should expect to notice a difference if it is gluten that is bothering me. Like I said in 12 days I'm pretty sure I have not had any gluten yet I still feel the same, maybe even worse. Because I've dealt with it with my brother I have a pretty good idea of what is ok or not so I don't think I've been inadvertently eating any.
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