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Freaking Out
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I went for my first doctor appointment in 7 years five days ago. I talked to my doctor about depression/anxiety, irritability, weight loss (60 lbs in 6 months) I had quit drinking soda bc i believed it was bloating me and making me gassy but it didn't really help. Also talked about me believing I was anemic due to my addiction to ice. He told me he wanted to run some blood tests for the anemia and possibly thyroid. Well he also tested me for celiac and I got the call yesterday that I had tested positively for celiac and I was anemic and had a vitamin D deficiancy. They are setting me up an appointment with a GI doctor. After reading up on the symptoms it all makes sense, but I am still scared about how big of a change this will be. I am 25 and a mother of three. My husband doesn't think it is a big deal but this is serious right? I should be freaking out a little right? Also, should my children get tested? Just need some comfort I guess.

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No reason to freak out. This condition is a lot easier to manage than others.

Yes, it is serious. But don't start the diet until after all of your testing is done.

Yes, your children need to be tested as this condition is genetic.

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I was scared of the possibility too at first, after all the research I did I realized it is such an easy disease to manage. To begin with you don't have to rely on doctors and medication, you cure yourself, naturally. I say cure because all symptoms and associated risks of celiac are diminished once clearing the body of gluten and your intestines heal. Also, gluten is a lot easier to avoid than you think, you can still drink all liquor, most wines and some beer, 5 of the 6 food groups are naturally gluten free and many restaurants and food chains are starting to adapt to gluten free with employees trained on cross contamination. If we were in the 80's I would be a bit more frightened but the world is now opening its eyes to celiac and the gluten free world.

Really, if you had to have any disease on this planet I would say celiac or hypothyroidism would be the top two for easiest to manage and smallest risks of other issues. Celiac is serious as in it's a disease however as for as diseases go it is not serious at all (once treated).

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your doc is a keeper!

Yes! And you had answers right away!
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I was diagnosed in February and it was quite a surprise to me as well. For me it felt both daunting and overwhelming in the beginning, but it does get better.

The newbie section of this forum has a lot of good information to get you started. It is probably worth having your husband read some of the information as well - the path will be a bit easier to navigate if he is there to support you. (My boyfriend was a bit skeptical at first as well, but it didn't take long before he was on board and now is always looking out for me).

It is a learning process, but will get easier with time...hang in there!!

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Thanks everyone!! I know that it is manageable but I work in a grocery store that isn't gluten friendly and I was randomly checking items and just about everything I checked contained some sort of gluten. It is just a big life change I guess. I have already decided that I will be fighting for more gluten free options in my store.

And also my doctor is great!! It is actually funny but my original doctor had left suddenly so the office distributed me to him. It was like God sent me to him!!

I go Thursday to the GI doctor so wish me luck!!

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... It was like God sent me to him!!

...

Well maybe he did! :)

Do stay with eating gluten until your testing completed. Here's some tips for when you do start the gluten-free diet.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take gluten-free vitamins.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

Helpful threads:

FAQ Celiac com

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101

What's For Breakfast Today?

What Did You Have For Lunch Today?

What Are You Cooking Tonight?

Dessert thread

Easy yummy bread in minutes

How bad is cheating?

Short temper thread

Non-celiac wheat sensitivity article

http://www.celiac.com/articles/23033/1/Non-Celiac-Wheat-Sensitivity-It-Exists/Page1.html

Thread For gluten-free, Dairy, Soy, Corn And Nightshade Free Recipes

Super Easy Meal Ideas Anyone?

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As you change the way you cook and prepare food, your entire family will benefit - they will be eating healthier too!

Get your children tested as soon as possible - even if there are no symptoms. Don't mess with their diets at all until testing is done.

The diet takes a bit of learning at first, but once you figure out your favorite foods and alter your favorite recipes, it is really not that hard. You will soon be feeling so much better - it will be worth the hassle.

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Met with my GI doctor yesterday!! He looked at my bloodwork after introducing himself and said "very interesting. I just met you and you are already a very interesting patient." He said he was 90% sure I had celiac sprue but wanted confirm before changing my life. I go January 8th for my endo. If confirmed he is going to send me to a nutritionist. I'm so happy that my doctors have taken charge!! Thanks for all the advice!

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Met with my GI doctor yesterday!! He looked at my bloodwork after introducing himself and said "very interesting. I just met you and you are already a very interesting patient." He said he was 90% sure I had celiac sprue but wanted confirm before changing my life. I go January 8th for my endo. If confirmed he is going to send me to a nutritionist. I'm so happy that my doctors have taken charge!! Thanks for all the advice!

Just my 2 cents.....if your biopsy is negative, please consider going gluten free anyway. Biopsies are very unreliable, and false negative results are very common. With your positive symptoms and bloodwork, you should not be consuming gluten. GI docs put WAY too much emphasis on that biopsy. You should also request genetic testing to see if you have the genes. If you do, your kids need to be tested as well.

Good luck!

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I agree. While a positive biopsy will indeed "comfirm" the diagnosis, a negative biopsy does NOT mean you don't have it. Don't let the doctor tell you otherwise. With your symptoms and blood test results, it is pretty obvious you should not be eating gluten.

Cara

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    • Now that my initial rage has calmed a tad.... your daughter has to fulfill 4 out of 5 of the diagnostic criteria. Second opinion can do a gene test. If positive, then she will have4 out of 5 of the dx criteria to dx without a positive biopsy. See: http://www.gastro.org/news_items/a-biopsy-should-not-be-required-to-make-the-diagnosis which says in part: The presence of signs and symptoms compatible with celiac disease. Positive serology screening (high serum levels of anti-TTG and/or EMA). Presence of the predisposing genes HLA-DQ2 and/or –DQ8. Histological evidence of auto-insult of jejunal mucosa typical of celiac disease. Resolution of the symptoms and normalization of serology test following the implementation of a gluten-free diet.   Also see: http://www.tenderfoodie.com/blog/2014/5/1/dr-fasano-on-new-gut-autoimmune-research-autism-clearing-up.html She can get a dx after her symptoms resolve on a gluten-free diet!
    • OMG!!!! The doc wants her to get sicker & sicker & do further damage so he can diagnose her? Don't do me any favors doc!!! I'm so spitting med right now I can't even speak! Find a new doc, take the records & get a second opinion. Maybe the next doc will have a freaking brain & dx your daughter. She should be dx'd! This is absurd in the extreme. The very least that should happen is the doc give her a dx now & then in a year or 2 have her do a gluten challenge & do a biopsy all over again but seriously, that would be just as cruel as what he's doing now. He's an ASS!
    • Celiac disease may lead to a host of other inflammatory, gluten-related ... Fortunately, Diet Doc offers gluten-free diet plans which are customized to ... View the full article
    • Cyclinglady is absolutely correct, after hours of internet research the only gluten-free food available at JNB is a fast food chain called 'Nandos'. I was hoping for a bit more variety, but I'll take what I get.   
    • I'm so confused about my daughter's diagnosis.  I hope somebody can help.   My 4 year old daughter has a swollen belly, stomachaches, and lots of gas.  She does not have diarrhea or delayed growth.  Because of her symptoms and because it runs in the family (2nd degree relatives) I had her tested for celiac.   She was weak positive for TTG (IGA)  and strong positive for DGP (IGG)   TTG (IGA)  8   (0-3 neg, 4-10 weak positive, greater than 10 positive) TTG (IGG)  2   EMA: Negative DGP (IGG)  47  (0-19 negative, 20-30 weak positive, greater than 30 positive) Last week, she had her endoscopy.  The doctor found inflammation and little holes or bumps on her duodenum.  He started her on prevacid and said based on his observations, he was suspicious of celiac, but he would not be able to confirm until the biopsy came back. The biopsy showed no signs of celiac disease.  He said that he could not diagnose her with celiac without the biopsy report saying there was celiac damage.  He said he would categorize her as a potential celiac, keep her on a gluten diet and redo the endoscopy in a year or two to check for damage again.  My questions are: 1.)  If it is not celiac, something is causing her duodenum to be inflamed and have little holes or bumps on it, right?  Could it be a wheat allergy or gluten sensitivity?  What else could it be and how do they test for it?  Given her elevated celiac antibodies, how likely is it to be anything besides celiac causing the damage?  2.)  How likely are false positives for TTG and DGP?  I've heard they are pretty sensitive and specific.  Does getting two positives make false positives less likely? 3.) What have you done in this situation?  I want her to have an official diagnosis to make things easier at school and to feel confident that we are eliminating gluten permanently for a worthy reason, etc.  But, I'm having a hard time imagining keeping her on gluten and waiting for her to get more sick and have more intestinal damage just for a diagnosis.     Thanks in advance for your help.  I'm so overwhelmed and confused.  I hope someone has some insight and experience that will help clear things up for me.            
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