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Speaking Of Cats....


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#1 GwenO

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:51 AM

We have a one year old standard poodle, an older small dog, and a five year old cat. All get along fine. My boyfriend has a two ish year old rescue husky/collie cross. Lovely dog. Loves my dogs, great with my daughter, no complaints there. The problem? He has quite a prey drive and the one time he saw my cat went completely ballistic. Not sure what he'd have done if he'd been allowed to catch her but he was barely controllable by a full grown man. The relationship is continuing and there is talk of cohabiting down the road a bit. Does anyone have ANY idea how to handle this? It's a huge stress in an otherwise great relationship. When my boyfriend comes over with the dog, we put the cat in my daughter's room, but it's hardly fair and not a long term solution. Neither one of us can figure out what to do.........
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#2 Gemini

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 12:52 PM

We have a one year old standard poodle, an older small dog, and a five year old cat. All get along fine. My boyfriend has a two ish year old rescue husky/collie cross. Lovely dog. Loves my dogs, great with my daughter, no complaints there. The problem? He has quite a prey drive and the one time he saw my cat went completely ballistic. Not sure what he'd have done if he'd been allowed to catch her but he was barely controllable by a full grown man. The relationship is continuing and there is talk of cohabiting down the road a bit. Does anyone have ANY idea how to handle this? It's a huge stress in an otherwise great relationship. When my boyfriend comes over with the dog, we put the cat in my daughter's room, but it's hardly fair and not a long term solution. Neither one of us can figure out what to do.........


The hunter/prey thing in Huskies is huge. They go after wildlife and domestic animals. I had a Husky/Shepherd mix and was floored when she went after, and tried to attack, a deer and then some sheep. :o It was something we were not able to address because, after consulting with a dog trainer, they advised the use of an electronic collar. My husband refused to use one and I thought he was wrong on that one but I lost the battle. I would not hesitate to use a collar on a dog like a Husky but you have to learn how to use them from a reputable trainer.
It does not take long to train a dog to not go after a cat when using these but you have to be willing to instill a little pain, however brief, in the training program. The urge to attack is genetic and you have to pull out the big guns when trying to break that habit.

We were able to keep her away from the deer and the sheep until she got too old to chase them anymore but a cat is different...it's your pet. I would ask a trainer in your area for some guidance because it's not something to address alone. I love Huskies......but I also love my cat and would not want this to happen.

Good luck!
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#3 mommida

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 06:03 AM

I agree with Gemini.

If you use the shock collar, you can convince the dog the cat has Jedi Ninja powers!
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#4 Gemini

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 11:51 AM

I agree with Gemini.

If you use the shock collar, you can convince the dog the cat has Jedi Ninja powers!


Ohhhh...that is funny! :lol: :lol: :lol:

You are correct. The pain has to seem to come from interaction with the cat, and not from the collar, so the dog will think kitty has Jedi Ninja powers! What a great way to put that!
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#5 Jestgar

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 12:03 PM

Neither one of us can figure out what to do.........


Take it quite seriously, whatever you do, and no matter how well you feel the dog has been trained, don't leave them alone together. A friend related a story of her nephew moving in with his girl friend. He had a dog, she, a cat. She came from shopping for a wedding dress to find the apartment covered in fur and blood. The dog had killed, and consumed much of the cat.
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#6 bartfull

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:42 PM

Yeah, shock collars don't always work either. I've known people who used them on their dogs and eventually the dog figures out it won't kill him so he puts up with the pain.

I would tell your boyfriend he has to find a new home for the dog. Sounds harsh, but there is no way I would ever put my cat at risk like that. If he is the right guy for you, he will understand and agree.
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#7 GwenO

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 08:52 AM

Thanks everyone. The dog shows no aggression in any other way, I've never even seen him growl. The shock collar is a good idea I'm thinking, negative association. I wouldn't leave them alone together, I don't even leave the standard with the cat, because he does like to chase her - playfully, but still. The other dog goes everywhere with my boyfriend, even to work - so that's a good thing, makes it all a little easier. I'm hoping something works, I don't want to ask him to rehome the dog - he loves him to pieces, but the cat is a family member too. Sigh.
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#8 bartfull

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:37 AM

I'm telling you, the shock collar won't work. Even if you are there, if the dog decides to eat your cat, you won't be able to stop him. I'd hate for you to witness that. You'd never get over it.

If you and your boyfriend insist that the dog is moving in too, you will need to keep them in seperate rooms at all times. I hate to sound like doom and gloom, but I strongly, VERY STRONGLY, suggest you don't do it. I think you need to decide which is more important to you. If he can't give up the dog, would you be willing to find a different home for the cat? Or if not, HE needs to decide whether keeping his dog is more important than moving in with you.

I'm sorry if it seems I am coming on too strong, but I GUARANTEE that the dog WILL eat the cat, even if he has a shock collar. I speak from experience here.
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Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#9 shadowicewolf

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:46 AM

I agree. The dog probably won't stop even with a shock collar.

It would be difficult to keep them in seperate rooms. All it takes is a cracked door.....
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#10 Adalaide

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 08:35 PM

My husband and I at one point considered getting a dog. I did a lot of research into it because we already have two pets, a cat (outdoor due to my very extreme allergies) and a bunny. What it came down to is that a lot of dogs are born hunters, some more than others and this simply can't be turned off or trained out of them. While possible to trick yourself into thinking they are getting along, it literally takes a moment of letting your guard down and once the dog gets it in his head he'll watch for his moment. Many cat and dog owners I talked to told me to simply wait on dog ownership if I didn't want to suffer the same disasters they did. Some did shock collars, some did professional training, some tried other methods. Few said they had lingering success, none felt comfortable even going to the bathroom or making a sandwich without locking a pet up. No matter what you decide, leaving them alone together no matter how well things are going will eventually turn out poorly.

I'm gonna be a different kind of Debbie Downer. All other variables aside you have dogs, multiple and a cat. He has dog, one, that sounds like is a 24/7 companion to him. If it comes down to re-homing, and honestly I think it will either come to that or a very dead cat, I think you are being unfair. You say that you would hate to ask him to re-home his dog and don't even mention you considered re-homing your cat. As heartbreaking as it is to lose a family member, I think it is far more reasonable for you to give up one of many pets than to ask him to give up his only pet.
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#11 GwenO

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 05:42 PM

Thanks for all the advice. The reason I don't want to rehome the cat is that she belongs to my eleven year old daughter, and she loves her dearly. And after a summer of hospitalization, and everything she's gone through, I just can't stomach the thought. She's had the cat since it was a kitten and they're inseperable......
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