Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Ladies With Celiac Disease
0

17 posts in this topic

Hi all. this is my first post on the forum. well i heard that women are 9x more likely to get dx than men.

Is this true? if yes do we know why? I think it might just be that women are more likely to see a doctor, more likely to have insurance, and to admit certain symptoms, etc. thoughts?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

It is worth noting that, in general, women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with ANY autoimmune condition. No one knows why.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is worth noting that, in general, women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with ANY autoimmune condition. No one knows why.

yeah i remember reading that somewhere too

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard its because women are more in tune to their body and more willing to go in and find out why.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My doctor said people who are high-strung are more likely to get diagnosed because of their personality. But I wonder if people with severe GI issues are more likely to be high-strung. I feel out of control when everything I eat makes me sick, so I get anxious...which means anxiety all the time until my diet is resolved. I've noticed women with autoimmune diseases do tend to be high-strung. Could there be a connection there?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




My doctor said people who are high-strung are more likely to get diagnosed because of their personality. But I wonder if people with severe GI issues are more likely to be high-strung. I feel out of control when everything I eat makes me sick, so I get anxious...which means anxiety all the time until my diet is resolved. I've noticed women with autoimmune diseases do tend to be high-strung. Could there be a connection there?

That makes sense. when you are stressed your body releases cortisol, which disrupts your immune system. Which may be the reason celiac disease presents itself after a period of stress or illness. I myself still get panic attacks even after being gluten free a long time :\

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is debate whether or not the diseases are more prominent in women or the fact that most men will ignore minor/medium symptoms. Since most autoimmune diseases cause very minimal symptoms until they progress in severity it is common for people just to think of a minor symptom as part of their life. It is also important to remember that autoimmune disease won't always progress to severe stages, take a look at the Chicago celiac center:

"Only 3% of people with the disease are diagnosed" -http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/medical-professionals/guide/diagnosis'>http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/medical-professionals/guide/diagnosis

"The number of Americans with celiac disease would fill 936 cruise ships. Passengers on 908 of the ships won’t know they have it." - http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/

I highly doubt that of these 97 percent undiagnosed celiac's they are all just ignoring severe symptoms and suggestive blood tests (I.e- anaemia) - The disease can very well have little affect on some people and show low positive results, sometimes these low positives will go to full blown positive and sometimes it wont. Autoimmune diseases in general are a guessing game with few providing a slam dunk diagnosis. Some people will go and live a completely normal and long life with a low stage autoimmune disease that never progresses.

I would be willing to bet that around 60 percent of the general population would have at least one slightly elevated antibody test if you ran the entire disease panels on them (I have had 15 different A.I antibodies tested and there are still more). Do these tests really mean anything at the current time? Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a few reports on TV that said women would be more prone to the autoimmune diseases than men because our immune systems are slightly different. We have to be able to shut off the immune response to a parasitic invader living inside us for 9 months. I affectionately call mine M & J. :). I don't have time to google that, but maybe you could find something along those lines as an explanation. Female hormones may be a factor, too. I don't think there is a real answer.

I have also heard that women are more likely to talk to each other, on forums, and with a doctor about health issues than men. I think women may go to doctors more regularly as they tend to see an OB/gyn every year or two.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is debate whether or not the diseases are more prominent in women or the fact that most men will ignore minor/medium symptoms. Since most autoimmune diseases cause very minimal symptoms until they progress in severity it is common for people just to think of a minor symptom as part of their life. It is also important to remember that autoimmune disease won't always progress to severe stages, take a look at the Chicago celiac center:

"Only 3% of people with the disease are diagnosed" -http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/medical-professionals/guide/diagnosis

"The number of Americans with celiac disease would fill 936 cruise ships. Passengers on 908 of the ships won’t know they have it." - http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/

I highly doubt that of these 97 percent undiagnosed celiac's they are all just ignoring severe symptoms and suggestive blood tests (I.e- anaemia) - The disease can very well have little affect on some people and show low positive results, sometimes these low positives will go to full blown positive and sometimes it wont. Autoimmune diseases in general are a guessing game with few providing a slam dunk diagnosis. Some people will go and live a completely normal and long life with a low stage autoimmune disease that never progresses.

I would be willing to bet that around 60 percent of the general population would have at least one slightly elevated antibody test if you ran the entire disease panels on them (I have had 15 different A.I antibodies tested and there are still more). Do these tests really mean anything at the current time? Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't.

So basically a lot of men will ignore the problem, GI problems or whatever it is, for as long as possible? Yeah I know people who would rather die than have to eat healthy/different food than they are used to!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL I'm "manly" and ignore the symptoms until a while after I should have gone to the hospital. LOL I ignored celiac for 30+ years.

I don't think acquiring an AI disease has to do with being highstrung. I've been called laid back to a fault so I know it's not the case for me, although I wouldn't doubt that a stressed person would end up with more symptoms.

I've read that they are looking into the link between the differences in our sex hormones. For some women, AI disease symptoms lessen after menopause because we have less hormones.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it really has to do with the individual, not their sex. I am pretty laid back, always end up at the doc's after later than I should have been there (almost manly there :D but had to diagnose hubs' DH - which made a believer out of him when he looked it up)

I would agreen with Karen that my immune system appears to be different, and perhaps??? one which the TNF inhibitors were designed for - crossed fingers smiley --).

But I do think, in general, women are more likely to avail themselves of medical treatment, or force the men in their lives into it, than men. I don't know if it comes from the mothering instinct (I have no children) or a general awareness of the body or interest in its functions, but speaking for myself only, I want to know what's going on, gosh darnit !!! I hate that fuzzy IBS zone :ph34r:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So basically a lot of men will ignore the problem, GI problems or whatever it is, for as long as possible? Yeah I know people who would rather die than have to eat healthy/different food than they are used to!

Well, I am a male. Since I have been going through a possible diagnosis I have talked to several friends about it and the surprising consensus among my male friends is that they all have pains that come and go and they just ignore, a few of them even have daily pains. I might be diagnosed although I have no symptoms of celiac, my way of thinking is treat it before it becomes symptomatic and problematic, my male friends all say the same thing "I would keep eating gluten until I was horribly sick and couldn't". My female friends are much more supportive of treating it before it becomes a problem. Once again you can't just simply group it as men do this and women do that but I do feel that men are more likely to ignore pains.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a few reports on TV that said women would be more prone to the autoimmune diseases than men because our immune systems are slightly different. We have to be able to shut off the immune response to a parasitic invader living inside us for 9 months. I affectionately call mine M & J. :). I don't have time to google that, but maybe you could find something along those lines as an explanation. Female hormones may be a factor, too. I don't think there is a real answer.

I have also heard that women are more likely to talk to each other, on forums, and with a doctor about health issues than men. I think women may go to doctors more regularly as they tend to see an OB/gyn every year or two.

This is very close to what I was about to respond - thanks for typing it out for me K!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is very close to what I was about to respond - thanks for typing it out for me K!

This is very close to what I was about to respond - thanks for typing it out for me K!

My poor tired fingers! Glad I could help.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but I do feel that men are more likely to ignore pains.

I believe women are more likely to ignore all minor pain and are more likely to realize and ADMIT something is not quite right in the bathroom.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL I'm "manly" and ignore the symptoms until a while after I should have gone to the hospital. LOL I ignored celiac for 30+ years.

I don't think acquiring an AI disease has to do with being highstrung. I've been called laid back to a fault so I know it's not the case for me, although I wouldn't doubt that a stressed person would end up with more symptoms.

I've read that they are looking into the link between the differences in our sex hormones. For some women, AI disease symptoms lessen after menopause because we have less hormones.

I used to ignore my symptoms when I was in middle school/high school (I'm in college now)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I am a male. Since I have been going through a possible diagnosis I have talked to several friends about it and the surprising consensus among my male friends is that they all have pains that come and go and they just ignore, a few of them even have daily pains. I might be diagnosed although I have no symptoms of celiac, my way of thinking is treat it before it becomes symptomatic and problematic, my male friends all say the same thing "I would keep eating gluten until I was horribly sick and couldn't". My female friends are much more supportive of treating it before it becomes a problem. Once again you can't just simply group it as men do this and women do that but I do feel that men are more likely to ignore pains.

A possible dx of gluten sensitivity you mean? Yea I have had people (mostly guys) tell me, "Well if I was you I would still eat whatever I wanted LOL"

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,654
    • Total Posts
      921,618
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes please, that'd be awesome Having a fun time trying to reply on my phone due to broken screen but will be back on tomorrow after results of doctor appointment to get to the bottom of why they've given me seemingly wrong advice re: next steps. Yup I'll admit to pity, anger, frustration and outright fear, been through the mill of emotions in this first week that's for sure. One thing before I go for that; back when I was self-diagnosing I wanted a full thyroid panel (T3, T4 etc.) and also ESR & CRP checks for vasculitis and similar maladies. Now it seems from my reading they can often follow celiac so my worry level of those has gone up a notch, more blood tests ahoy it seems? Main reason for worrying about those is the nearly constant tight / tender head I have at the moment. Top and sides of scalp. Could be the stress tensing the shoulders and occipital muscles at back of head but after the celiac diagnosis being missed I'm fearful of anything else being missed. Did anyone else have this tight head feeling at the start? Feels like the skin is being pulled inwards, sometimes goes down for a few minutes here and there and gets worse when sitting I think. I see the term "brain fog" a lot but luckily don't seem to have too much of that at present, this is more a physical sensation.
    • I don't have a lot of faith in the allergy testing naturalpaths do. I had them done, but really it wasn't very helpful. Foods that were okay on the blood work- I was still having obvious reactions to. Skin testing through an allergist didn't show up food allergies either. I agree the food elimination diet is a better way to go and doesn't cost a bunch of money. I did a whole 30 diet a while back that could have been helpful if the foods I reacted to were corn, dairy,  soy, grains and sugar- but I react to more than that.  I do need to do a major elimination diet- just haven't gotten up the willpower yet.   
    • Quick search gave too many responses to TGI Fridays but none to TGI Fridays Buns (or similar) so... I was talking with my sister-in-law (Gluten Intolerant) and she spoke highly of a pre-packaged bun from Fridays. I was hesitant but she gave me one (apparently you can buy them from the restaurant?) and I tried it. Since I'm slow to react I won't know about gluten for a bit but I can definitely say it is the closest to "real" I've had in years! Spongy, doesn't crumble while eating a sandwich and tastes good. Color me impressed! I tried to determine the manufacturer or if Fridays actually makes them but I can't locate anything worth pursuing. Anyone have information on this? Thanks in advance.
    • Thanks cyclinglady! I will!
    • You could ask the allergist to give you a starting point for an elimination diet. You would start out with 5 or so foods and then add in one new food a week to see if you react. If you react you of course drop that food. It is a bit of a pain as everything has to be basically single ingredient to start.  My allergist felt that was the best way to go and more accurate than blood testing.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,654
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    bentcreekmom
    Joined