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Dr. Arthur F. Coca Diy Pulse Testing For Allergies
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2 posts in this topic

Hello all!

Has anyone heard about Dr. Arthur F. Coca's Pulse test? Basically you record your pulse 30 minutes after eating and if it jumps more than 15 bbm over your baseline, you are having a reaction to what you ate. This may be helpful for people struggling to find foods that are bad news.

This is the Pulse Test from Dr. Arthur F. Coca 1956

http://www.soilandhe...020108.coca.pdf

" The Pulse-Dietary Technique

The technice of the new method of diagnosis is fairly simple,

and it can usually be applied without interruption of your daily

occupation.

If you have a proper interest in the experiment you should

begin by carefully recording your usual diet for a period of five

to seven days, and your (one minute) pulse counts in that period

as follows:

before rising

before retiring

just before each meal and

three times, at 30 minute intervals after each meal (fourteen

counts each day).

The "before rising" count is taken in the recumbent position.

For all the other counts the posture should be consistent; that is,

always sitting or always standing.

Interpretation

1) If the highest count is the same each day, and if it is not

over 84, you are most likely not allergic, and the range of your

pulse from the lowest count (usually before rising) to the highest

will be not more than 16 beats--probably much less. In this case

the record should be continued for two weeks, in which all usual

and unusual foods should be included in your diet.

2) A count greater than 84, points to "food-allergy."

3) If the maximal count varies more than two beats from day

to day; for example, Monday 72, Tuesday 78, Wednesday 76,

Thursday 71, you are certainly allergic, provided there is no

infection.

4) If you are allergic to only a few foods, and if by chance

none of these was eaten with two or more successive meals the

counts after those meals may be found to remain within a range

(from the lowest count) that can be considered normal, say 8 to

14 beats.

For example, if the lowest "before rising" counts are 60 to 62,

and if on several days the high counts are 80 to 90 but on one day

the count does not exceed 74, it is most likely that no food allergens

were eaten on that day in other words, you are not allergic to any

food that you ate. In this case you restrict your diet for another day

to that list, and thereafter add one new food each day until one of them

causes the pulse to beat faster, and is thus recognized as one of your

allergens--to be avoided thereafter; and so on. This is an easy case to solve.

5) Another unusual outcome occurs in those who are allergic

to no food whatever but only to tobacco. On the days when a

smoker does not smoke, his pulse may stay within a normal

range and the allergic symptoms vanish.

More frequently the "food-allergens" are common foods that

are eaten at every meal. These keep the pulse above normal or

make it erratic. In such case it is necessary to test the different

foods singly. To do this you eat the single foods in small quantity

at about one hour intervals. "

I don't recommend anyone eats something they know is bad to do this test !

I just found this information today because I had some ranch dressing today and had a pretty bad reaction (D and runny nose) two to three hours later. So I checked my Blood pressure.

I didn't check my blood pressure until four hours after and got 120/84 96 (SYS/DIA pulse). Only my pulse seemed high but I have always only paid attention to my sys/dia numbers. So about an hour and fifteen minutes later yet I'm starting to feel better, no gluten symtoms :) and I check it again and got 112/80 109. Fourty minutes later I have 117/89 118.

From http://www.mayoclini...rt-rate/AN01906

"A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats a minute"

Anyone have more info on average pulse rates? I have been sitting here relaxing in my chair since my first bp reading.

Before going gluten free for about six months (about a year ago) I had hypertension that I took medication for that averaged 145/95. I had to slowly stop taking it because of low blood pressure symtoms. (a sprinkle of salt on your tounge raises your bp). Since then My Doctor advised me to check my bp daily at home. It has never been over 127/85. I got myself a digital battery operated blood pressure montior for under $30. Since then I have been checking it and it stays around 115/80. I was told under 120 for me is ideal. But like I said I never paid attention to the pulse numbers but 85 seems like an average. In the last few months I have been not checking it because its always been good. But this test seems true to me so I am going to start this.

So this is getting looong, and I'm feeling ok but tired so its sleep time.

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Hello all!

Has anyone heard about Dr. Arthur F. Coca's Pulse test? Basically you record your pulse 30 minutes after eating and if it jumps more than 15 bbm over your baseline, you are having a reaction to what you ate. This may be helpful for people struggling to find foods that are bad news.

This is the Pulse Test from Dr. Arthur F. Coca 1956

http://www.soilandhe...020108.coca.pdf

" The Pulse-Dietary Technique

The technice of the new method of diagnosis is fairly simple,

and it can usually be applied without interruption of your daily

occupation.

If you have a proper interest in the experiment you should

begin by carefully recording your usual diet for a period of five

to seven days, and your (one minute) pulse counts in that period

as follows:

before rising

before retiring

just before each meal and

three times, at 30 minute intervals after each meal (fourteen

counts each day).

The "before rising" count is taken in the recumbent position.

For all the other counts the posture should be consistent; that is,

always sitting or always standing.

Interpretation

1) If the highest count is the same each day, and if it is not

over 84, you are most likely not allergic, and the range of your

pulse from the lowest count (usually before rising) to the highest

will be not more than 16 beats--probably much less. In this case

the record should be continued for two weeks, in which all usual

and unusual foods should be included in your diet.

2) A count greater than 84, points to "food-allergy."

3) If the maximal count varies more than two beats from day

to day; for example, Monday 72, Tuesday 78, Wednesday 76,

Thursday 71, you are certainly allergic, provided there is no

infection.

4) If you are allergic to only a few foods, and if by chance

none of these was eaten with two or more successive meals the

counts after those meals may be found to remain within a range

(from the lowest count) that can be considered normal, say 8 to

14 beats.

For example, if the lowest "before rising" counts are 60 to 62,

and if on several days the high counts are 80 to 90 but on one day

the count does not exceed 74, it is most likely that no food allergens

were eaten on that day in other words, you are not allergic to any

food that you ate. In this case you restrict your diet for another day

to that list, and thereafter add one new food each day until one of them

causes the pulse to beat faster, and is thus recognized as one of your

allergens--to be avoided thereafter; and so on. This is an easy case to solve.

5) Another unusual outcome occurs in those who are allergic

to no food whatever but only to tobacco. On the days when a

smoker does not smoke, his pulse may stay within a normal

range and the allergic symptoms vanish.

More frequently the "food-allergens" are common foods that

are eaten at every meal. These keep the pulse above normal or

make it erratic. In such case it is necessary to test the different

foods singly. To do this you eat the single foods in small quantity

at about one hour intervals. "

I don't recommend anyone eats something they know is bad to do this test !

I just found this information today because I had some ranch dressing today and had a pretty bad reaction (D and runny nose) two to three hours later. So I checked my Blood pressure.

I didn't check my blood pressure until four hours after and got 120/84 96 (SYS/DIA pulse). Only my pulse seemed high but I have always only paid attention to my sys/dia numbers. So about an hour and fifteen minutes later yet I'm starting to feel better, no gluten symtoms :) and I check it again and got 112/80 109. Fourty minutes later I have 117/89 118.

From http://www.mayoclini...rt-rate/AN01906

"A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats a minute"

Anyone have more info on average pulse rates? I have been sitting here relaxing in my chair since my first bp reading.

Before going gluten free for about six months (about a year ago) I had hypertension that I took medication for that averaged 145/95. I had to slowly stop taking it because of low blood pressure symtoms. (a sprinkle of salt on your tounge raises your bp). Since then My Doctor advised me to check my bp daily at home. It has never been over 127/85. I got myself a digital battery operated blood pressure montior for under $30. Since then I have been checking it and it stays around 115/80. I was told under 120 for me is ideal. But like I said I never paid attention to the pulse numbers but 85 seems like an average. In the last few months I have been not checking it because its always been good. But this test seems true to me so I am going to start this.

So this is getting looong, and I'm feeling ok but tired so its sleep time.

Hmmm my pulse is what my chiropractor says is the most stubburn of my measurements to go down. I was told before to check after meals for a change in pulse. Five years back was the last time I went to Culvers for a fish dinner. My pulse went from its usual 70 to 90 beats per minute. I do think there is something to this. I thank you for reminding me of it.

Diana

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