Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Dr. Arthur F. Coca Diy Pulse Testing For Allergies
0

2 posts in this topic

Hello all!

Has anyone heard about Dr. Arthur F. Coca's Pulse test? Basically you record your pulse 30 minutes after eating and if it jumps more than 15 bbm over your baseline, you are having a reaction to what you ate. This may be helpful for people struggling to find foods that are bad news.

This is the Pulse Test from Dr. Arthur F. Coca 1956

http://www.soilandhe...020108.coca.pdf

" The Pulse-Dietary Technique

The technice of the new method of diagnosis is fairly simple,

and it can usually be applied without interruption of your daily

occupation.

If you have a proper interest in the experiment you should

begin by carefully recording your usual diet for a period of five

to seven days, and your (one minute) pulse counts in that period

as follows:

before rising

before retiring

just before each meal and

three times, at 30 minute intervals after each meal (fourteen

counts each day).

The "before rising" count is taken in the recumbent position.

For all the other counts the posture should be consistent; that is,

always sitting or always standing.

Interpretation

1) If the highest count is the same each day, and if it is not

over 84, you are most likely not allergic, and the range of your

pulse from the lowest count (usually before rising) to the highest

will be not more than 16 beats--probably much less. In this case

the record should be continued for two weeks, in which all usual

and unusual foods should be included in your diet.

2) A count greater than 84, points to "food-allergy."

3) If the maximal count varies more than two beats from day

to day; for example, Monday 72, Tuesday 78, Wednesday 76,

Thursday 71, you are certainly allergic, provided there is no

infection.

4) If you are allergic to only a few foods, and if by chance

none of these was eaten with two or more successive meals the

counts after those meals may be found to remain within a range

(from the lowest count) that can be considered normal, say 8 to

14 beats.

For example, if the lowest "before rising" counts are 60 to 62,

and if on several days the high counts are 80 to 90 but on one day

the count does not exceed 74, it is most likely that no food allergens

were eaten on that day in other words, you are not allergic to any

food that you ate. In this case you restrict your diet for another day

to that list, and thereafter add one new food each day until one of them

causes the pulse to beat faster, and is thus recognized as one of your

allergens--to be avoided thereafter; and so on. This is an easy case to solve.

5) Another unusual outcome occurs in those who are allergic

to no food whatever but only to tobacco. On the days when a

smoker does not smoke, his pulse may stay within a normal

range and the allergic symptoms vanish.

More frequently the "food-allergens" are common foods that

are eaten at every meal. These keep the pulse above normal or

make it erratic. In such case it is necessary to test the different

foods singly. To do this you eat the single foods in small quantity

at about one hour intervals. "

I don't recommend anyone eats something they know is bad to do this test !

I just found this information today because I had some ranch dressing today and had a pretty bad reaction (D and runny nose) two to three hours later. So I checked my Blood pressure.

I didn't check my blood pressure until four hours after and got 120/84 96 (SYS/DIA pulse). Only my pulse seemed high but I have always only paid attention to my sys/dia numbers. So about an hour and fifteen minutes later yet I'm starting to feel better, no gluten symtoms :) and I check it again and got 112/80 109. Fourty minutes later I have 117/89 118.

From http://www.mayoclini...rt-rate/AN01906

"A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats a minute"

Anyone have more info on average pulse rates? I have been sitting here relaxing in my chair since my first bp reading.

Before going gluten free for about six months (about a year ago) I had hypertension that I took medication for that averaged 145/95. I had to slowly stop taking it because of low blood pressure symtoms. (a sprinkle of salt on your tounge raises your bp). Since then My Doctor advised me to check my bp daily at home. It has never been over 127/85. I got myself a digital battery operated blood pressure montior for under $30. Since then I have been checking it and it stays around 115/80. I was told under 120 for me is ideal. But like I said I never paid attention to the pulse numbers but 85 seems like an average. In the last few months I have been not checking it because its always been good. But this test seems true to me so I am going to start this.

So this is getting looong, and I'm feeling ok but tired so its sleep time.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hello all!

Has anyone heard about Dr. Arthur F. Coca's Pulse test? Basically you record your pulse 30 minutes after eating and if it jumps more than 15 bbm over your baseline, you are having a reaction to what you ate. This may be helpful for people struggling to find foods that are bad news.

This is the Pulse Test from Dr. Arthur F. Coca 1956

http://www.soilandhe...020108.coca.pdf

" The Pulse-Dietary Technique

The technice of the new method of diagnosis is fairly simple,

and it can usually be applied without interruption of your daily

occupation.

If you have a proper interest in the experiment you should

begin by carefully recording your usual diet for a period of five

to seven days, and your (one minute) pulse counts in that period

as follows:

before rising

before retiring

just before each meal and

three times, at 30 minute intervals after each meal (fourteen

counts each day).

The "before rising" count is taken in the recumbent position.

For all the other counts the posture should be consistent; that is,

always sitting or always standing.

Interpretation

1) If the highest count is the same each day, and if it is not

over 84, you are most likely not allergic, and the range of your

pulse from the lowest count (usually before rising) to the highest

will be not more than 16 beats--probably much less. In this case

the record should be continued for two weeks, in which all usual

and unusual foods should be included in your diet.

2) A count greater than 84, points to "food-allergy."

3) If the maximal count varies more than two beats from day

to day; for example, Monday 72, Tuesday 78, Wednesday 76,

Thursday 71, you are certainly allergic, provided there is no

infection.

4) If you are allergic to only a few foods, and if by chance

none of these was eaten with two or more successive meals the

counts after those meals may be found to remain within a range

(from the lowest count) that can be considered normal, say 8 to

14 beats.

For example, if the lowest "before rising" counts are 60 to 62,

and if on several days the high counts are 80 to 90 but on one day

the count does not exceed 74, it is most likely that no food allergens

were eaten on that day in other words, you are not allergic to any

food that you ate. In this case you restrict your diet for another day

to that list, and thereafter add one new food each day until one of them

causes the pulse to beat faster, and is thus recognized as one of your

allergens--to be avoided thereafter; and so on. This is an easy case to solve.

5) Another unusual outcome occurs in those who are allergic

to no food whatever but only to tobacco. On the days when a

smoker does not smoke, his pulse may stay within a normal

range and the allergic symptoms vanish.

More frequently the "food-allergens" are common foods that

are eaten at every meal. These keep the pulse above normal or

make it erratic. In such case it is necessary to test the different

foods singly. To do this you eat the single foods in small quantity

at about one hour intervals. "

I don't recommend anyone eats something they know is bad to do this test !

I just found this information today because I had some ranch dressing today and had a pretty bad reaction (D and runny nose) two to three hours later. So I checked my Blood pressure.

I didn't check my blood pressure until four hours after and got 120/84 96 (SYS/DIA pulse). Only my pulse seemed high but I have always only paid attention to my sys/dia numbers. So about an hour and fifteen minutes later yet I'm starting to feel better, no gluten symtoms :) and I check it again and got 112/80 109. Fourty minutes later I have 117/89 118.

From http://www.mayoclini...rt-rate/AN01906

"A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats a minute"

Anyone have more info on average pulse rates? I have been sitting here relaxing in my chair since my first bp reading.

Before going gluten free for about six months (about a year ago) I had hypertension that I took medication for that averaged 145/95. I had to slowly stop taking it because of low blood pressure symtoms. (a sprinkle of salt on your tounge raises your bp). Since then My Doctor advised me to check my bp daily at home. It has never been over 127/85. I got myself a digital battery operated blood pressure montior for under $30. Since then I have been checking it and it stays around 115/80. I was told under 120 for me is ideal. But like I said I never paid attention to the pulse numbers but 85 seems like an average. In the last few months I have been not checking it because its always been good. But this test seems true to me so I am going to start this.

So this is getting looong, and I'm feeling ok but tired so its sleep time.

Hmmm my pulse is what my chiropractor says is the most stubburn of my measurements to go down. I was told before to check after meals for a change in pulse. Five years back was the last time I went to Culvers for a fish dinner. My pulse went from its usual 70 to 90 beats per minute. I do think there is something to this. I thank you for reminding me of it.

Diana

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,145
    • Total Posts
      919,572
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I found when I went gluten free I started eating more dairy and that gave me worse stomach aches and bloating than the gluten did. So now I have to avoid gluten and dairy.  Maybe you have a similar problem with something you are eating.  I hope you feel better soon.  
    • Hi! I received my "official" celiac diagnosis last week. I had an endoscopy last month that was originally looking for ulcers and h. pylori, but they did some biopsies of my duodenum since they were in the neighborhood and the biopsy came back "consistent with Celiac's disease" and later. They urged me to get my blood checked and follow up with my primary doctor. My blood work came back negative, but my doctor was confident it's Celiac so told me to stay away from gluten. I've been completely gluten free (or to the best of my knowledge) for 2 weeks now, and my results are mixed. At first, I felt great! My stomach was no longer CRAZY bloated once I stopped eating pasta and bread, my acne started healing, and the red rash on the back of my arms started to fade. That was the first few days. Lately, though, my acne is once again flaring up and I've been SO EXHAUSTED. I feel so tired all the time. Even now I have fatigue in my head, limbs, and I could hardly walk or move my body earlier today. I'm overweight and I like to go to the gym, but what used to be an easy workout for me is kicking my ass! I used to go to the gym and tear it up: HIIT on the treadmill followed by 40 minutes of heavy weight lifting. Now I can hardly finish 3 reps in my first set without feeling like a nap. I can't run anymore because my body feels clumsy and heavy. Also, I'm still bloated. I don't suffer from painful, acute bloating, but I struggle to pass gas and I look like I have pregnant belly. I think I'm also retaining water all over my body, and I'm not sure if that's normal? For whatever reason, I have this belief that water is mainly retained in the core and not arms, legs, and face. Anyway, I'd love to hear what you have to say/what you've experienced. Is this typical to first going gluten free?
    • Thanks Stephanie & Gemini for the info. that the 4 of 5 doesn't apply to children. I wasn't aware of that until now. 
    • I think the posters above have given you very good information and I will throw in my 2 cents worth.  I am surprised that they did not test her DGP IgA also.  I am sure that would have been positive.  They switched off with antibody classes and usually they do both tests for both antibodies.  IgA is more specific to Celiac but the IgG is also useful.  The testing shows your daughter is producing antibodies to the gluten in her diet. (DGP IGG). THe tTg shows positive for some damage or inflammation. You know........your daughter is only 4.  She hasn't been on the planet or eating gluten that long. It can take years for enough damage to occur for it to be able to be found on biopsy.  I would say it is highly likely that this is Celiac, especially with her symptoms. But because the damage hasn't graduated to bad enough yet, they won't diagnose her. I think you need to do what others have said and get all copies of testing and find someone else who will take a look and give a diagnosis, especially if they have you do a dietary trial and her symptoms go away.  That might be the only recourse if you want faster proof. I know I would want faster.  I would not really be happy if I thought I had to keep feeding her something that was making her sick.  If you keep her on gluten long enough, the diarrhea will probably show up. BTW.........the criteria mentioned regarding diagnosis does not apply to kids.  I know it's silly and stupid but most leading Celiac specialists do not go by this criteria for kids.......adults only.  Keep that in mind because it might come up.  You could recognize it but they might not. Have you considered gene testing, to help bolster a diagnosis? As far as false positives go, it's the other way around. False negatives happen more frequently than many people think.  It's a recurring theme here.  With her symptoms, which is what I had, a bloated belly and tummy aches are telling.  Have they tested her for lactose intolerance?  That can cause similar symptoms, although it sure won't raise those 2 blood tests.  Keep looking for Celiac because there are many red flags here.
    • This 4 out of 5 criteria does not apply to children. I was never given a reason why, but it isn't.     That said, you may try to get a second opinion from another GI who may be willing to give her a firm dx.  We were in your boat 6 years ago and while I'm sure I'll get slammed for it, I wish we had kept gluten in our kiddos diet till he scoped positive for a variety of reasons.  Again, even family is different and you have to find what is best for you!
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,178
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Sarah.e.may9602
    Joined