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Pizza Dough


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#1 Mgyoung77

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 05:14 PM

Can pizza dough be made ahead of time? If so, how should it be stored?
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#2 FatBear

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 05:58 PM

I use Astoria Mills pizza dough mix. I routinely make a double batch and keep half in the fridge for a day or two. It is at least as good if not better on the second day. I think they even claim that it can be frozen, though I have never tried it.
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#3 Mgyoung77

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 07:22 PM

Do you keep it in a ball after it rises and then store it?
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#4 FatBear

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 02:24 PM

Do you keep it in a ball after it rises and then store it?

Sorry I'm late to answer. Didn't have my notifications set.
Yes, I just keep it in a ball and refrigerate it. It needs to come to room temperature before you use it. That's not such a big deal unless you are in a hurry: just flatten it partly and then let it warm before really forming it.

Also, did I say "double batch"?! I meant that I make a half batch and then save half of that. My wife and I cannot eat huge quantities of pizza, even if it is gluten free. Here's how I make the pizza:

I bought an 11" square cast iron griddle without a handle that just fits into my toaster oven. I get it warming up at 425 and then make the pizza. I mash the dough out on a floured (yes gluten-free flour) board, drizzle on some olive oil to give it that nice Italian flavor, then put some sliced onions, tomatoes and tasty cheese (not mozzarella) on it. Some cooked bacon or other smoked meat gives it a wood-fired flavor. Then I grease the griddle with some coconut oil (best vegetable oil to use on cast iron that I have found) and slide the pizza onto it. It cooks hot and fast and tastes great. Top with some fresh basil and grated parmesan if you have it.
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#5 peiblue

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:19 PM

Have you tried to par cook the crust and then wrap and freeze it?
I have worked on a few recipes that actually improved in texture after freezing.
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#6 love2travel

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:31 PM

Have you tried to par cook the crust and then wrap and freeze it?
I have worked on a few recipes that actually improved in texture after freezing.

This is my preferred way of making it, too. So convenient for those days you've just got to have pizza STAT!
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#7 FatBear

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:33 PM

What does it mean to "par cook" it?
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#8 mushroom

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:50 PM

Since love2travel is offline, parboil is equivalent to blanching, enough cook to stop the spoiling process, but not the whole way, and par bake is cook halfway, so it is no longer raw and subject to rising, but still needs to go back in the oven for the finishing bake. Like the semi-baked rolls you can find in the supermarket that you pop in the oven for the final 5-10 mins.
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#9 FatBear

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 07:10 PM

Oh, I see. Thank you. I'm an old guy, so I guess I'm not in such a hurry. The term "pop" is not part of my regular working vocabulary. I mix enough for two pizzas and just save half in the fridge for the next day or two.
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