Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Help--Recently Diagnosed--Mostly Vegetarian Eater......gluten Free Diet Panic


  • Please log in to reply

20 replies to this topic

#16 DownWithGluten

 
DownWithGluten

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 214 posts
 

Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:36 PM

Oh and, just more on this...as far as restaurants. Probably the best and most consistent one I've found to work is Outback Steakhouse. I know, you don't eat meat! But I have a vegan sister and she can find things there. As well, P.F. Changs is good, they even bring their gluten free dishes out on a different kind of plate and the staff always seem to remember to warn you not to eat the regular sauces and offer to bring out gluten-free soy sauce. I've had success with Uno's as well. Depending on where you live, some areas have a lot more cute little non-chain places that offer gluten free items, more than others. (mine is one of the 'others' but I've travelled to places with better options haha). Chipotle has always worked for me, too, however some more sensitive people may advise against it. Do not eat the flour tortillas. I avoid the salad dressing and the hottest salsa as well.

Always, you have to give them the song and dance about your diet and double check that they know what you mean and that they will avoid cross contamination. I get all whip-cracking on them, and usually have to witness with my own eyes that they write down 'gluten free' next to my order. I stress it to them probably at least five times. It's very annoying but better safe than sorry. You can usually size up how comfortable the waiter is by how they respond. For example, If they ask you "well you tell me what you can eat" it's not a good sign. I've seen many a face fall, a bead of sweat drip, a tremor of nervousness when I mention to them that I'm gluten free and will get sick if I consume it. lol. I will be stubborn and resort to "can you ask the chef? the chef should know.." b/c sometimes the waiters are just ignorant. I had one guy who was sarcastic and rude when I asked to double check about their broccoli dish, he was all "uum it's broccoli" (but of course, what about the seasoning?) and then he came back basically groveling and apologetic so I assume the chef put him in his place. Anyway...it is definitely a song and dance. For new and unfamiliar places (still, I try to stick to ones that I've found have gluten free options online)...it's ALWAYS recommended to call them ahead of time and go through the whole song and dance. Being honest, this is all a huge pain the butt. There will be heartbreak and frustration and anger navigating "eating out." Your friends and family are going ot have to get used to eating at the same 2-3 places a million times, or just eat out less...or on occasion you'll have to eat beforehand and just sit and drink some Coke while they eat. Awkward but I've done to at least still go out and socialize. I feel I've struck a balance. But I do so long for the days when I could just eat out on a whim, without having to plan it beforehand, stress about it all day...etc.

there's an art to the gluten free restaurant dining experience. Let me know if you have any more questions. I feel I air on the more strident, "paranoid" side. Then again, there are people more strident than me who wouldn't recommend ever eating out. So...you'll find your level of comfort. again, in time!
  • 0
Gluten-free since January, 2007

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 Pegleg84

 
Pegleg84

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 612 posts
 

Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:38 AM

Panic is normal. I think we all had a bit of that.
Being gluten free and vegetarian should not be much trouble. As long as you can still handle dairy and soy. As someone mentioned, be especially careful of veggie "meats" and such, as they often will have gluten as filler, but tofu can replace most of that. (one reason why I don't
Even though it's more expensive, an organic/natural foods store might be the best way to find what you need as replacements. When you're healing it's better to stick to as simple as possible. Gluten-free or not, the fewer the ingredients the better. Eat lots of rice, nuts, cheese, avocadoes, etc etc.

Eating out is always the stickler. I still get burned for not asking enough questions. If you can avoid eating out, do. Ask people over for dinner and cook yourself. If you're travelling, bring lots of snacks and some foods you can make a meal out of easily, even if it means a lot of snacking. (Again, avocadoes! What would I do without them...). When you do eat out, ask a million questions. Indian and Vietamese are good for both gluten-free and vegetarian.

Anyway, take a breath. You'll be ok. an the more you heal the better you'll feel. It's early days.
Happy healing

Peg
  • 0

~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.


#18 General Ludd

 
General Ludd

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
 

Posted 06 January 2013 - 08:41 PM

When I learned I couldn't eat gluten anymore, I had a pretty hard time too. Eating out, pot-lucks, social gatherings, family gatherings are still a challenge, but nowhere near as bad as I originally expected. The worst thing is to dwell on what you're going to miss. I used to bake bread regularly, I grieved at the loss of this simple pleasure, but after a few years and some accidental glutenings, the thought of bread of any kind is unappealing. I don't miss it one bit.

As for beer, I used to love a thick stout and dabbled in homebrew a bit. Beer was one of the first foods that I had trouble with when my gluten sensitivity started becoming noticeable. So I had stopped drinking it long before I realized I had a problem with Gluten. Since then I've had some of the sorghum and rice beers and they are both quite light and flavorful. I don't remember what Corona tastes like, but sorghum can be made into a light pilsner (but with a distinct aftertaste). It reminded me so much of beer my body got ready for trouble that never hit.

If you are foodie (I am not, but I like tasty food), go to the recipe sites like Gluten Free Goddess for inspiration and hope. There are so many delicious foods out there. I like to remind my family that most of the food in the world is gluten free. My mom has become quite the skilled gluten-free pie and home-made gluten-free ravioli maker! I don't know how she does it, but you can't tell the difference. In fact, I think gluten-free pie crusts can easily be better than wheat ones!
  • 1
I have been lactose intolerant since 1990. I went gluten free in 2010 after bloating, cramping, increasingly foul gas, and uncomfortable itching on the tail end of things was becoming unbearable. After a short time without gluten I'd felt better than I'd felt in years. I generally eat a low-fat, high-fiber diet full of colorful foods. I eat meat only when I eat out (at places I trust).

My IgA came back at low-normal levels, and I have not had gut biopsy for celiac because I was gluten-free for at least a month before I could get in to see a GI specialist. By then I wasn't about to eat gluten again just so I could have an invasive procedure that might tell me I shouldn't eat something I already know is making me sick.

#19 Luddie

 
Luddie

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 71 posts
 

Posted 06 January 2013 - 09:54 PM

Panic is normal. I think we all had a bit of that.
Being gluten free and vegetarian should not be much trouble. As long as you can still handle dairy and soy. As someone mentioned, be especially careful of veggie "meats" and such, as they often will have gluten as filler, but tofu can replace most of that. (one reason why I don't
Even though it's more expensive, an organic/natural foods store might be the best way to find what you need as replacements. When you're healing it's better to stick to as simple as possible. Gluten-free or not, the fewer the ingredients the better. Eat lots of rice, nuts, cheese, avocadoes, etc etc.

Eating out is always the stickler. I still get burned for not asking enough questions. If you can avoid eating out, do. Ask people over for dinner and cook yourself. If you're travelling, bring lots of snacks and some foods you can make a meal out of easily, even if it means a lot of snacking. (Again, avocadoes! What would I do without them...). When you do eat out, ask a million questions. Indian and Vietamese are good for both gluten-free and vegetarian.

Anyway, take a breath. You'll be ok. an the more you heal the better you'll feel. It's early days.
Happy healing

Peg

I agree, the longer you're doing this the easier and better it gets. Yes, eating out is almost impossible, but so be it. I'd rather feel good all the time. One thing I'd suggest when you're starting out on this journey. Don't think you can safely use foods labeled "gluten free" as many have substances in them that will bother you. Some of the gums that are used instead of gluten to thicken and stabilize for instance. And there is some evidence now that some celiacs are sensitive to the gluten found in other grains thought to be "safe" such as corn and rice. So take the advice of a previous entry to eat a simple diet for the time being, and definitely use real foods (butter, not substitutes, for example). I'd also suggest you keep a diary of what you eat and drink, and how you feel the next day (make a simple chart on your computer xcel to make it easier). You might find some correlations. Good luck and be glad you've found this out early in your life so you can deal with it before anything really bad happens.
  • 0

#20 dbruno1602

 
dbruno1602

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
 

Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:27 PM

I have had Celiac Disease for 10 months now. At first, I was so upset and I didn't know what I was going to do. I am very lucky that my husband said whatever I had to do he would do the same. My whole house is gluten free and we do go out to eat every now and then but it is only to restaurants that I trust. I look at what I can eat, not what I can't. I have always cooked and enjoyed it but I really enjoy it now and I am always looking for different things to cook. If you can, join Pinterest. There are alot of recipes that you will enjoy and won't have to pay for books. There are more and more gluten-free items becoming available and there are some really good items out there to purchase. I have apps on my phone that tell me where I can eat and what to purchase at the stores. If you would like them, I would be more than happy to give you them. I wish you all the best.
  • 0

#21 dreacakes

 
dreacakes

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 54 posts
 

Posted 08 January 2013 - 05:48 PM

Oh honey, I totally understand your pain! I was vegan when I went gluten free. I was also really thin and could never get full!
I tried a gluten free vegan diet for a few months, but was still very sick.

The unfortunate reality is that meats are very nutrient dense foods that are easily absorbed by the body. Some of these nutrients are not available (in a bioavailable form) in plant foods, like B12 and long chain omega 3s. If you have gut damage and are already having trouble absorbing nutrients, vegetarianism and veganism will just make it worse. (I know I'm gonna offend some folks by saying that, but it's true!) I was also taking all my supplements back then and still deficient. You have to get your nutrients from the best source and eat lots of it right now. It will help your body heal.

My health didn't start to improve until I went on a paleo diet. I now eat bone broth, liver, all sorts of things I never thought I would, and it's saved my health! I also grained a little weight, have a lot more energy, and I'm not hungry all the time anymore.

If you're interested, book on nutrition that is wonderful is this one:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/145169914X

I hope you feel better soon! And don't worry, this diet can be a pain in the rear, but it's SO worth it! :)
I also have a pintrest page with really yummy recipes if you're interested (they won't let me post the link here, but you can PM me for it if you like.) :)
  • 0
Debilitating tendonitis in both arms in 2003, at age 23, declared "permanent and stationary" by workman's comp doctors.
Fibromyalgia diagnosis in 2010.
Mild hyperthyroidism diagnosis 2011.
Disc Degeneration diagnosis 2012.
Life long battle with hypoglycemia.
Gluten Free since 2010. On Paleo-type diet since May 2011.
Suffered years of brain fog, back spasms, nausea, and recurring connective tissue pain and injuries. After years of misdiagnosis, I did my own elimination diet and discovered a severe reaction to wheat gluten and casein. After going on a grain free, nightshade free, Paleo-ish diet, my symptoms are nearly gone, and I FINALLY KICKED THE BRAIN FOG!
Cheers to health! <3




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: