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What Do You Do At The Hospital?


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14 replies to this topic

#1 kristenloeh

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

This is a huge fear of mine... When/if I have to have my brain surgery, if the hospital doesn't provide gluten free options, how will I eat while staying there? I saw in the prison post that a lot of people said that the hospitals where they are at didn't provide a gluten free option. Any suggestions as to what to do if they don't? Anyone else been in this dilemma?
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Diagnosed Celiac 04.2012
Gluten-Free 04.2012

 

Diagnosed Pituitary Prolactinoma 12.2012

Low Cortisol/Possible Addison's Disease 02.2013

 

Maybe one day I will feel "normal" again. <3


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#2 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:44 AM

Before you worry for nothing in advance (a quality many of us have PhDs in) :D

Find out what hospital you are going to and meet with the staff dietician. They may be more enlightened than we think. (okay, I am being skeptically sarcastic here...)

or
Have someone you know bring you food?
or

Check with a local gluten-free cafe? For example:
The local gluten-free cafe here--the angel who owns it will make food and have it delivered to you.

I am sure others will chime in now.....wait for it......it's coming..............
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#3 Adalaide

 
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    It needs to be about 20% cooler.

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:45 AM

Do you have friends/family who are non-moronic and can bring you food that isn't a thousand kinds of contaminated?

If not, can you plan ahead and bring things with you? You'll probably be on clear liquids first. You could bring broths you know are safe in small containers from the store or in the boxes and they can refrigerate it. They should have a microwave on the surgery floor and a nurse can just microwave the broth for you. Bring jellos in little plastic single serve cups. (They usually make their own jello at the local hospitals here, I trust them not at all to even get that right.)

Thinking back to after I had my gallbladder out, after I was handling clear liquids they let me add pudding and milk. Milk came in cartons, any moron can bring you a carton of milk up and not open it. (Assuming you do milk.) And you could bring pudding cups from home too. Or if you have a friend/family you trust this is where you could have them bring a dairy sub if you need to made with whatever "milk" you use.

Eventually you'll be on "real" food. I never got that far in the hospital but you will since your surgery is pretty serious. You'll probably have to talk to either your doctor or plan time to go talk to the surgery floor staff ahead of time about what that food is. Plan what sorts of things you can bring. If you can't trust someone to prep food for you, you could always prep it and freeze it and have someone bring it when it is time.

I remember after my surgery I was STARVING!!! However much time they say you'll be there, plan for longer. However much you think you'll eat, plan for more. Better to be over-prepped than under. I haven't done this myself, as my surgery is when I was diagnosed but it is something I have thought on often as it is a super huge fear of mine.

Also, make sure they know ahead of time what brands of what meds are okay orally, or that they are only allowed to give you IV meds. My hospital charts all say that I am never to be given oral medication under any circumstances. With enough planning, everything should be as stress free as possible. (As if, right?)
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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#4 kareng

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:58 AM

Honestly, we have a hospital here that thinks a diet for someone with high blood sugar is anything they want except dessert. I would have someone bring my food and pack some food. The last thing you need is diarrhea or migraines from a glutening.

Maybe you live in an area that is gluten aware? I thought you said Portland in another post? The hospital might be Ok there. I would check with them first and make sure your doctor writes gluten-free diet in as many places as he can. Then if you get any trouble, you can refer them to your doctor's orders.
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
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#5 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:06 AM

She said she's in Seattle. (where are your cheaters, Missy??) :P
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#6 lindalee

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:09 AM

I take a crockpot, cup, spoon and ladle to the hospital for friends with homemade chicken soup. The first few days they can eat the broth and afterwards the chicken. Vegetables can be added when solid food can be eaten. The crockpot can stay plugged in -it's in the room so they can have a cup whenever they want. It is much healthier for them than microwaving, also.

Whatever you have prepared at home can be used at the crockpot later.

Hope that helps!
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Lee

#7 kareng

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:10 AM

She said she's in Seattle. (where are your cheaters, Missy??) :P


I was trying to remember. Too lazy to stop posting, go back and check, re- post or edit.
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


#8 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:11 AM

I was trying to remember. Too lazy to stop posting, go back and check, re- post or edit.


Happens as we age, granny.
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#9 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:13 AM

I take a crockpot, cup, spoon and ladle to the hospital for friends with homemade chicken soup. The first few days they can eat the broth and afterwards the chicken. Vegetables can be added when solid food can be eaten. The crockpot can stay plugged in -it's in the room so they can have a cup whenever they want. It is much healthier for them than microwaving, also.

Whatever you have prepared at home can be used at the crockpot later.

Hope that helps!


Fantastic idea. The vegs and chicken can stay fresh enough for a few days like that?? Impressive.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#10 Adalaide

 
Adalaide

    It needs to be about 20% cooler.

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:31 AM

Fantastic idea. The vegs and chicken can stay fresh enough for a few days like that?? Impressive.


Meh, it's soup. What is the worst that will happpen? It will be soggy? I'm sure she'll totally care, drugged senseless on narcotics.
  • 0

"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#11 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:45 AM

My children are realizing that if I need a hospital stay they will need to bring me food. If I knew in advance I would freeze servings. I might try bringing my electric skillet if allowed. However, otherwise my children could cook or eat it at home and then keep it warm in my car oven. I am hoping I do not end up in the hospital.

Diana
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#12 lindalee

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:53 AM

Fantastic idea. The vegs and chicken can stay fresh enough for a few days like that?? Impressive.


It stays fresh, I tell them just to keep it on warm overnight. They tell me everyone in the hospital comes by because it smells so good.

I have all size crockpots. If you are staying several days, I recommend that you take the large one. I usually carry it and supplies into the hospital in a box and leave the box there for them to carry it home and then I pick it up.

The broth is delicious. It is the basic SCD chicken soup recipe. whole chicken, onions, carrots, celery and parsley and filtered water.
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Lee

#13 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:58 AM

Meh, it's soup. What is the worst that will happpen? It will be soggy? I'm sure she'll totally care, drugged senseless on narcotics.


No, giraffe girl..........not because it will be soggy. :P

I have a "thing" about food sitting out for days ......, but if the poster Linda Lee says it's okay, I believe her.

That's why I asked.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#14 kareng

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:43 PM

I got the little lunch crockpot. One reason was, if I had to go to the hospital, it would be easy for my family to bring me some Progresso gluten-free soup or some chicken broth from home in the morning. It would be hot for my lunch while they were at work or school.

I would definitely check with the hospital first. Many hospitals have this "super broth" that is the first food they give people after surgery. It tasted like beef broth but I would check the ingredients first. Most hospitals have yogurt, jello, pudding, milk, juice in sealed packages you could suplement with. There are also microwaves on all the floors. Some have fridges you can keep food in. They are behind the nurses desk, you have to ask a nurse to get it. These are all things to find out first, not while you are groggy and your family is worried about you.
  • 0

Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


#15 kristenloeh

 
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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

Thank you all for the great advise! I was seriously freaking out about it! You guys are my saviors! <3
  • 0

Diagnosed Celiac 04.2012
Gluten-Free 04.2012

 

Diagnosed Pituitary Prolactinoma 12.2012

Low Cortisol/Possible Addison's Disease 02.2013

 

Maybe one day I will feel "normal" again. <3





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