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Homemade Mayo


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#1 KikiB

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 12:45 PM

I have not been able to find a mayo without soy, and started searching for mayo recipes.

http://www.seriousea...mayonnaise.html


This was super easy and the mayo came out great.
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#2 bartfull

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 01:22 PM

Mom made all of her condiments from scratch even before she was diagnosed with celiac. My Dad had asthma and was allergic to all of the artificial coloring, flavoring, and preservatives in foods. Mom was a fabulous cook and all of my friends used to complain that THEIR Moms couldn't cook like mine.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#3 KikiB

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 02:25 PM

Mom made all of her condiments from scratch even before she was diagnosed with celiac. My Dad had asthma and was allergic to all of the artificial coloring, flavoring, and preservatives in foods. Mom was a fabulous cook and all of my friends used to complain that THEIR Moms couldn't cook like mine.


That's awesome!

It's been 2.5 hours since I ate my mayo with tuna and I'm really queasy. Dang it. Could it be the Canola oil? Do Celiacs have problems with that? Or could I have developed an intolerance to tuna?
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#4 a1956chill

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 02:58 PM

That's awesome!

It's been 2.5 hours since I ate my mayo with tuna and I'm really queasy. Dang it. Could it be the Canola oil? Do Celiacs have problems with that? Or could I have developed an intolerance to tuna?


tuna can contain soy oil , did you check your tuna for soy?
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Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#5 bartfull

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:01 PM

What brand of tuna was it? Did you read the label? From what I have read, some tuna has vegetable broth in it and that broth contains soy.

I used to love tuna as a school kid. I ate it every day. When I found out that there were dolphins caught in the nets and processed right along with the tuna, I gave it up. Years later when they started having "dolphin safe" tuna, I started eating it again but only for a while. I found that I was getting queasy from it. I don't know if it was because of soy or what. I just don't bother eating it anymore.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#6 KikiB

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:32 PM

tuna can contain soy oil , did you check your tuna for soy?


What brand of tuna was it? Did you read the label? From what I have read, some tuna has vegetable broth in it and that broth contains soy. I used to love tuna as a school kid. I ate it every day. When I found out that there were dolphins caught in the nets and processed right along with the tuna, I gave it up. Years later when they started having "dolphin safe" tuna, I started eating it again but only for a while. I found that I was getting queasy from it. I don't know if it was because of soy or what. I just don't bother eating it anymore.


Kirkland brand: White tuna, water, salt. Pyrophosphate added. No soy, no broth.

Do you have a problem with soy? Or just tuna?
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#7 mushroom

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:47 PM

I eat Costco's tuna all the time; in fact it's the only tuna I eat.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#8 bartfull

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:55 PM

I DO have trouble with soy, but my reactions are usually skin related. The tuna made me sick to my stomach. But that could have been psychosomatic. Maybe I was still thinking about the dolphins.

But getting back to you - maybe it WAS the canola oil. Not that it has gluten or anything, but until you heal completely, just about anything might set you off. (Personally, I no longer like the taste of canola oil. I can actually tell if a potato chip was cooked in it by the taste.) Maybe you can try making mayo with a different kind of oil next time. I like sunflower oil the best, but everyone is different.
  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#9 mushroom

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

bartfull has a good suggestion. I won't eat canola either unless I am desperate. Why don't you try using light olive oil? It doesn't have the strong taste of regular extra virgin olive oil. Sunflower is okay but I think we all get enough omega-6.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#10 love2travel

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:05 PM

I, too, make my own condiments and such from scratch. Using regular olive oil, as Mushroom suggests, is by far the best oil for making aioli. Believe me - I've made it countless times using different oils, methods, etc. Though I love my extra virgin olive oils, they are just too much for aioli. Regular olive oil has what is called a better "mouthfeel" in vinaigrettes and aiolis.

Canola oil would also be my very last scraping-the-barrel choice but as I have about 13 kinds of oil, that won't happen. ;)
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#11 KikiB

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:10 PM

I DO have trouble with soy, but my reactions are usually skin related. The tuna made me sick to my stomach. But that could have been psychosomatic. Maybe I was still thinking about the dolphins. But getting back to you - maybe it WAS the canola oil. Not that it has gluten or anything, but until you heal completely, just about anything might set you off. (Personally, I no longer like the taste of canola oil. I can actually tell if a potato chip was cooked in it by the taste.) Maybe you can try making mayo with a different kind of oil next time. I like sunflower oil the best, but everyone is different.


bartfull has a good suggestion. I won't eat canola either unless I am desperate. Why don't you try using light olive oil? It doesn't have the strong taste of regular extra virgin olive oil. Sunflower is okay but I think we all get enough omega-6.



I'll look for sunflower oil. (My sister made the same mayo with olive oil, and it did not taste good.)

Maybe I should try eating just tuna with nothing on it (ick) and see if I get sick again. But not right away...
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#12 KikiB

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:12 PM

I, too, make my own condiments and such from scratch. Using regular olive oil, as Mushroom suggests, is by far the best oil for making aioli. Believe me - I've made it countless times using different oils, methods, etc. Though I love my extra virgin olive oils, they are just too much for aioli. Regular olive oil has what is called a better "mouthfeel" in vinaigrettes and aiolis.

Canola oil would also be my very last scraping-the-barrel choice but as I have about 13 kinds of oil, that won't happen. ;)


I've never liked extra virgin olive oil. I've always heard it was the best, so I assumed it would taste better than regular. Maybe I'll look into the regular (or the light that Mushroom suggested).

Could it be the Canola oil that made me sick? Or is it more likely the tuna?
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#13 mushroom

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:27 PM

I really can't imagine either of them being a problem, per se. I just happen to not like canola oil and also the fact it is genetically modified stuff always turns me off. As I say, I eat Costco tuna all the time.

The only way to figure out if you do have a problem with either is to try them separately.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#14 love2travel

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:34 PM

I've never liked extra virgin olive oil. I've always heard it was the best, so I assumed it would taste better than regular. Maybe I'll look into the regular (or the light that Mushroom suggested).

Could it be the Canola oil that made me sick? Or is it more likely the tuna?

Brands vary like crazy, too. Some Greek EVOOs are soooo mild. I prefer Italian or my favourite, Croatian. Good EVOO oils should be either in tins or dark glass and say "cold pressed". I get mine from specialty stores and olive groves on our travels. But I do buy my regular olive oil from grocery stores.

I dislike canola oil for the same reasons Mushroom cites. I wonder whether it was the tuna that got you sick. Was it packed in water or oil? Either way, sorry you aren't feeling well! :(
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#15 KikiB

 
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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

Brands vary like crazy, too. Some Greek EVOOs are soooo mild. I prefer Italian or my favourite, Croatian. Good EVOO oils should be either in tins or dark glass and say "cold pressed". I get mine from specialty stores and olive groves on our travels. But I do buy my regular olive oil from grocery stores.

I dislike canola oil for the same reasons Mushroom cites. I wonder whether it was the tuna that got you sick. Was it packed in water or oil? Either way, sorry you aren't feeling well! :(


Thank you! It was packed in water.
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