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Does This Mean For Sure He Is Not Gluten Int/celiac?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 TammyTE

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:50 AM

My 8yo ds was grain free for 10 months.
We added grains back in for 3 months.
He had blood work done but they forgot to order the celiac test.
He had stayed on grains up until a week before the 2nd test.
The 6 days before he had some quaker oats but nothing else until the day before.
The night before the 2nd blood draw he had a sandwich
The morning of he had a sanwich.

It was the best I could do because I thought we would be going off gluten very soon because he showed an allergy to wheat. Now we re still on grains until we see an allergist in a few weeks.

Do you think this test is accurate? Since the total IgA was 107 and considered "sufficient" that would mean he had enough gluten in his system right? Or am I wrong to assume that? here are his results:

Biomarkers
Total IgA = 107 (Sufficient) Range 17-94
Anti-Tissue Transglutamanase IgA (tTG IgA) = <1.2 (Negative) Range <4.0
Anti-Deamidated Gliadin IgA (DGP IgA) = 2 (Negative) Range <20
Anti-Gliadin IgA (AGA IgA) = 2 (Negative) Range <20
Anti-Gliadin IgG (AGA IgG) = 15 (Negative) Range <20
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#2 mushroom

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 05:29 PM

Tammy, the Total IgA, when it says "sufficient" in the results, just means that your son makes what is considered to be a normal amount of IgA antibodies (in general) for someone his age. It says nothing at all about whether or not he was eating sufficient gluten for the test to be valid. Neither would the two sandwiches he ate immediately before the test affect whether or not he tested positive or negative for celiac. It is hard to say whether the one week of no gluten preceding the test had any impact on his results. I know this is very frustrating for you, that they "forgot" to do the celiac testing when that is what you were eating gluten for. However, it is what it is. :) :rolleyes:
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#3 TammyTE

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 05:49 PM

Tammy, the Total IgA, when it says "sufficient" in the results, just means that your son makes what is considered to be a normal amount of IgA antibodies (in general) for someone his age. It says nothing at all about whether or not he was eating sufficient gluten for the test to be valid. Neither would the two sandwiches he ate immediately before the test affect whether or not he tested positive or negative for celiac. It is hard to say whether the one week of no gluten preceding the test had any impact on his results. I know this is very frustrating for you, that they "forgot" to do the celiac testing when that is what you were eating gluten for. However, it is what it is. :) :rolleyes:


Well shoot. Do you think I should keep him on gluten (we still haven't stopped it because everything has been so uncertain.) for his allergy appt in a couple weeks? Then I could ask the allergist to run a new gluten panel. Does the number of 15 on the IgG seem like things could be close at all or am I over thinking it and maybe he doesn't have an issue?

I DO know that he is a different child when off grains. That is certain. I just don't know why. because when he was off grains he was also off tons of other stuff. Dairy, sugar and beans are some main foods he also avoided for that 10 mos or so.
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#4 mushroom

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:15 PM

No, I do not think the 15 score has a lot of meaning. While not a negative, it is a very weak "peep" on the scale. But not getting positive scores on celiac testing does NOT mean that he does not have an issue with gluten. It just means that he flunked the test :D because he didn't study hard enough? :rolleyes: I do believe you when you say he is a different child when off grains - heck, I believe I was talking about non-celiac gluten sensitivity a long while before people like Dr. Fasano got around to it. When you are SURE that all testing is complete, definitely take him gluten free, no doubt in my mind, regardless of what the test results are. It's just this darned testing that's getting in his way. Once he is off grains (and I would include dairy at first) you will find out if there is anything else he needs to be off. This could include sugar, beans, soy, corn.... no way of knowing right now. If you try removing one or more of them and he still has problems then take him back to what he was eating when he didn't have problems and trial the other foods one at a time.

Yes, you have come this far, go the extra couple of weeks on gluten until the allergy appointment and ask for the panel to be run again, and tell the allergist why.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#5 TammyTE

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:25 PM

Thanks. I sure hope the allergist will listen. We've never seen him before. He has a blog and I've read several of his articles. He *seems* to have a very common sense approach, which is what drew me to him.
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#6 radish

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:34 PM

Thanks. I sure hope the allergist will listen. We've never seen him before. He has a blog and I've read several of his articles. He *seems* to have a very common sense approach, which is what drew me to him.

who is the allergist? just curious :)
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#7 TammyTE

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:12 PM

http://www.pediatric...ergyindy.com/�� is his blog. :)
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