Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Antibody Tests For Celiac Disease
0

9 posts in this topic

I've been looking for a better test than IgE, since that is immediate response, and the one the docs always want to give us. Since celiac disease is autoimmune, that doesn't make sense. What also doesn't make sense to me is having an IgA test done, being it only indicates having an unspecified auto-immune disease. Since I have already been diagnosed having Hashi's, this test would not make sense, as I already know I have an auto-immune disease, so I got to thinking, what test did they give me to determine the thyroid test, specifically? I looked it up, and it was a thyroid antibody test. That led me to wonder why there isn't one for intestinal antibodies....or was there? Googled it, and came up with PubMed article with a study on:

Intestinal anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in potential coeliac disease.

As a result of the data collected in this study, it shows "the measurement of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies may prove useful in clinical practice to predict evolution towards mucosal atrophy in potential coeliac patients and identify patients with gluten sensitivity." Thoughts, anyone???

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I've been looking for a better test than IgE, since that is immediate response, and the one the docs always want to give us. Since celiac disease is autoimmune, that doesn't make sense. What also doesn't make sense to me is having an IgA test done, being it only indicates having an unspecified auto-immune disease. Since I have already been diagnosed having Hashi's, this test would not make sense, as I already know I have an auto-immune disease, so I got to thinking, what test did they give me to determine the thyroid test, specifically? I looked it up, and it was a thyroid antibody test. That led me to wonder why there isn't one for intestinal antibodies....or was there? Googled it, and came up with PubMed article with a study on:

Intestinal anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in potential coeliac disease.

As a result of the data collected in this study, it shows "the measurement of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies may prove useful in clinical practice to predict evolution towards mucosal atrophy in potential coeliac patients and identify patients with gluten sensitivity." Thoughts, anyone???

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ahhh....missed an important part of the study.... [[[biopsy]]] which means, this is not a blood test. how frustrating that they can obtain an antibody test from your blood for thyroid, but not for intestinal, because it needs to be from the mucosa and not the blood...ahhhh...okay.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

opps, looks like I hit the reply button to my own post :rolleyes:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an Elisa test. I believe it looked for IgG, total IgA and IgE. I had IgG antibodies to Pracitically everything I was eating. I could not cut out eatting everything, so I am doing a rotational diet and eating them all.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I'm confused - have you had a complete celiac antibody panel?

Total IgA

tTG - both IgA and IgG

EMA

DGP - both IgA and IgG

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm confused - have you had a complete celiac antibody panel?

Total IgA

tTG - both IgA and IgG

EMA

DGP - both IgA and IgG

No, I've been wondering whether I should, as from what I understand it doesn't diagnose celiac disease specifically, only that I would have an auto-immune disease? If this is the case, then it would come up positive because I have auto-immune thyroid disease and it would be a waste of my money. If this is specific, I would get it done in a heartbeat, but from my reading, the only test that is specific are the intestinal and dh rash biopsies?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I've been wondering whether I should, as from what I understand it doesn't diagnose celiac disease specifically, only that I would have an auto-immune disease? If this is the case, then it would come up positive because I have auto-immune thyroid disease and it would be a waste of my money. If this is specific, I would get it done in a heartbeat, but from my reading, the only test that is specific are the intestinal and dh rash biopsies?

I am currently traveling so I have no access to specific research, but you should keep researching or perhaps someone else will chime in with some papers for you to read.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Below is from Lab Tests Online ( http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/celiac-disease/tab/sample ):

Common tests for celiac disease include:

  • IgA class of Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody (anti-tTG): Tissue transglutaminase is an enzyme that causes the crosslinking of certain proteins. Anti-tTG, IgA is the most sensitive and specific blood test for celiac disease but may be negative in children under 3 years old. The IgG class of anti-tTG may be ordered as an alternative in those who have a deficiency of IgA. Although "tissue" is in the name of these tests, they are measured in the blood.
  • Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGA), IgG and IgA classes: Gliadin is part of the gluten protein found in wheat (similar proteins are found in rye, barley, and oats). AGA is an autoantibody directed against the gliadin portion.
  • Quantitative immunoglobulin A (IgA): Used to determine if someone is deficient in the IgA class of antibodies and whether the IgG class of autoantibody tests should be performed.
  • Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) Antibodies, IgA: Anti-DGP test is a relatively new test that may be positive in some people with celiac disease who are anti-tTG negative, including children less than 3 years old.

Other tests less commonly performed include:

  • Anti-Endomysial Antibodies (EMA), IgA class: Endomysium is the thin connective tissue layer that covers individual muscle fibers. Anti-Endomysial antibodies are developed in reaction to the ongoing damage to the intestinal lining. It has been found that tTg is the substance detected in this test. Almost 100% of patients with active celiac disease and 70% of patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (another gluten-sensitive condition that causes an itchy, burning, blistering rash on the skin) will have the IgA class of anti-EMA antibodies. The test is more difficult to do and interpret properly than anti-tTg.
  • Anti-Reticulin Antibodies (ARA), IgA class: Anti-ARA is not as specific or sensitive as the other autoantibodies. It is found in about 60% of celiac disease patients and about 25% of patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.
  • Anti-Actin (F-actin), IgA class: The F-Actin antibody test may indicate increased intestinal damage.

As I understand it, ttg IgA can come up positive in thyroid patients but the other tests are not linked to thyroiditis. The EMA IgA shows a reaction to ongoing damage to the lining of your intestines, meaning if you have a positive test there has been a LOT of damage done; I believe the EMA IgA is extremely specific to celiac disease BUT there are a few other more rare health issues that can cause extensive damage to the gut as well. It you end up with a couple of positive tests, chances are it's celiac.

TPO Ab, which is used to diagnose Hashimotos, is not just specific to Hashimotos either; it is also used to diagnose other health problems as well... like the celiac tests can do as well.

But, I find that if it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it's probably a duck. Those tests usually point to one disease, not always but when you consider symptoms and history, it gives you a better idea of what a test result indicates.

This is just my interpretation, but I hope that made sense. :) Best wishes to you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,099
    • Total Posts
      920,357
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I_would_widen_the_search_to_your_whole_environment.....Carefully_consider_what_else_was_different_when_you_felt_better.
    • Thanks a lot for your advice and the link. I will surely check upon GCED. But, doesn't a negative HTTG (can't do IgA ttg as IgA deficiency) result mean that I am not exposed to gluten ? 
    • Thank you for going through my long post and responding. I have been both dairy and gluten-free free for 10 months now. Yes, even I was worried about other food allergies. I mentioned it to my GI doc and asked if I need food allergy test to eliminate other allergens. He said, food allergy tests give a lot of false positives and are not accurate. He said: not everything is because of food allergy and it's refractory celiac which is causing issues as the jejunum biopsy, done recently, is showing villous flattening.

      My doubt: 1. If I have so much damage in my small intestine (villous flattening) then how was I keeping fine for 6-7 months ( eating eggs, soy, rice and meat) - was constantly losing weight though - but was able to work out regularly - not much fatigue. 2. If it is other food allergens ( out of mentioned allergens, I take eggs, soy chunks, almonds only) why does it happen only few times and not always - I keep well for 7-8 days and then fall sick again - this without any change in diet.  
    • Oh, Trish at the GlutenFreeWatchDog tested Planter's honey roasted peanuts three years ago.  The can did not state gluten-free, but showed no gluten ingrediants (per Kraft policy).  Test result: less than 5 part per million which is pretty much gluten-free.  
    • What if it were something else that glutened you?  Maybe you ate too much of a good thing?  I once (three months post dx) ate too much gluten-free fried chicken, vomited, passed out and fractured my back (osteoporosis) in the process.  Paramedics, ER doc and Cardio all thought I was having a heart attack.   No.  It was sheer gluttony and bad bones.  Not good to overload with a damaged gut.    Maybe you did get some contaminated nuts.  Afterall, anything processed is suspect.  What might be well tolerated by some, might be too much for others.  We all have our various levels of gluten intolerance.   The old 20 parts per million is just a guideline, but science does not really know (lack of funding......doe anyone really care enough to find out?)  My hubby has been gluten-free for 15 years.  When I was first diagnosed, I tried to eat the gluten-free foods that I normally gave him.   Problem was he was healed and I was not.  Things like Xanthan Gum in commercial processed gluten-free breads make me feel like I have been glutened, but it is just (and still is) an intolerance.  So no bread for me unless I make it myself using a different gum.   Too lazy, so I do without.   so, ask your doctor if you really want to know or lay off the cashews and test them again in a month using a certified gluten-free nut.  I wish this was easier!    
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,134
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Alinapep
    Joined