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Antibody Tests For Celiac Disease
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9 posts in this topic

I've been looking for a better test than IgE, since that is immediate response, and the one the docs always want to give us. Since celiac disease is autoimmune, that doesn't make sense. What also doesn't make sense to me is having an IgA test done, being it only indicates having an unspecified auto-immune disease. Since I have already been diagnosed having Hashi's, this test would not make sense, as I already know I have an auto-immune disease, so I got to thinking, what test did they give me to determine the thyroid test, specifically? I looked it up, and it was a thyroid antibody test. That led me to wonder why there isn't one for intestinal antibodies....or was there? Googled it, and came up with PubMed article with a study on:

Intestinal anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in potential coeliac disease.

As a result of the data collected in this study, it shows "the measurement of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies may prove useful in clinical practice to predict evolution towards mucosal atrophy in potential coeliac patients and identify patients with gluten sensitivity." Thoughts, anyone???

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I've been looking for a better test than IgE, since that is immediate response, and the one the docs always want to give us. Since celiac disease is autoimmune, that doesn't make sense. What also doesn't make sense to me is having an IgA test done, being it only indicates having an unspecified auto-immune disease. Since I have already been diagnosed having Hashi's, this test would not make sense, as I already know I have an auto-immune disease, so I got to thinking, what test did they give me to determine the thyroid test, specifically? I looked it up, and it was a thyroid antibody test. That led me to wonder why there isn't one for intestinal antibodies....or was there? Googled it, and came up with PubMed article with a study on:

Intestinal anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in potential coeliac disease.

As a result of the data collected in this study, it shows "the measurement of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies may prove useful in clinical practice to predict evolution towards mucosal atrophy in potential coeliac patients and identify patients with gluten sensitivity." Thoughts, anyone???

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ahhh....missed an important part of the study.... [[[biopsy]]] which means, this is not a blood test. how frustrating that they can obtain an antibody test from your blood for thyroid, but not for intestinal, because it needs to be from the mucosa and not the blood...ahhhh...okay.

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opps, looks like I hit the reply button to my own post :rolleyes:

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I had an Elisa test. I believe it looked for IgG, total IgA and IgE. I had IgG antibodies to Pracitically everything I was eating. I could not cut out eatting everything, so I am doing a rotational diet and eating them all.

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I'm confused - have you had a complete celiac antibody panel?

Total IgA

tTG - both IgA and IgG

EMA

DGP - both IgA and IgG

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I'm confused - have you had a complete celiac antibody panel?

Total IgA

tTG - both IgA and IgG

EMA

DGP - both IgA and IgG

No, I've been wondering whether I should, as from what I understand it doesn't diagnose celiac disease specifically, only that I would have an auto-immune disease? If this is the case, then it would come up positive because I have auto-immune thyroid disease and it would be a waste of my money. If this is specific, I would get it done in a heartbeat, but from my reading, the only test that is specific are the intestinal and dh rash biopsies?

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No, I've been wondering whether I should, as from what I understand it doesn't diagnose celiac disease specifically, only that I would have an auto-immune disease? If this is the case, then it would come up positive because I have auto-immune thyroid disease and it would be a waste of my money. If this is specific, I would get it done in a heartbeat, but from my reading, the only test that is specific are the intestinal and dh rash biopsies?

I am currently traveling so I have no access to specific research, but you should keep researching or perhaps someone else will chime in with some papers for you to read.

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Below is from Lab Tests Online ( http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/celiac-disease/tab/sample ):

Common tests for celiac disease include:

  • IgA class of Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody (anti-tTG): Tissue transglutaminase is an enzyme that causes the crosslinking of certain proteins. Anti-tTG, IgA is the most sensitive and specific blood test for celiac disease but may be negative in children under 3 years old. The IgG class of anti-tTG may be ordered as an alternative in those who have a deficiency of IgA. Although "tissue" is in the name of these tests, they are measured in the blood.
  • Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGA), IgG and IgA classes: Gliadin is part of the gluten protein found in wheat (similar proteins are found in rye, barley, and oats). AGA is an autoantibody directed against the gliadin portion.
  • Quantitative immunoglobulin A (IgA): Used to determine if someone is deficient in the IgA class of antibodies and whether the IgG class of autoantibody tests should be performed.
  • Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) Antibodies, IgA: Anti-DGP test is a relatively new test that may be positive in some people with celiac disease who are anti-tTG negative, including children less than 3 years old.

Other tests less commonly performed include:

  • Anti-Endomysial Antibodies (EMA), IgA class: Endomysium is the thin connective tissue layer that covers individual muscle fibers. Anti-Endomysial antibodies are developed in reaction to the ongoing damage to the intestinal lining. It has been found that tTg is the substance detected in this test. Almost 100% of patients with active celiac disease and 70% of patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (another gluten-sensitive condition that causes an itchy, burning, blistering rash on the skin) will have the IgA class of anti-EMA antibodies. The test is more difficult to do and interpret properly than anti-tTg.
  • Anti-Reticulin Antibodies (ARA), IgA class: Anti-ARA is not as specific or sensitive as the other autoantibodies. It is found in about 60% of celiac disease patients and about 25% of patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.
  • Anti-Actin (F-actin), IgA class: The F-Actin antibody test may indicate increased intestinal damage.

As I understand it, ttg IgA can come up positive in thyroid patients but the other tests are not linked to thyroiditis. The EMA IgA shows a reaction to ongoing damage to the lining of your intestines, meaning if you have a positive test there has been a LOT of damage done; I believe the EMA IgA is extremely specific to celiac disease BUT there are a few other more rare health issues that can cause extensive damage to the gut as well. It you end up with a couple of positive tests, chances are it's celiac.

TPO Ab, which is used to diagnose Hashimotos, is not just specific to Hashimotos either; it is also used to diagnose other health problems as well... like the celiac tests can do as well.

But, I find that if it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it's probably a duck. Those tests usually point to one disease, not always but when you consider symptoms and history, it gives you a better idea of what a test result indicates.

This is just my interpretation, but I hope that made sense. :) Best wishes to you.

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