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Bad Constipation Help
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12 posts in this topic

Seeking some advice. Been constipated off and on for 2 months. First tried the usual, prunes, figs, gluten-free granola, prune juice, etc. Didn't help. Then I tried Citrucel... not a cure but at least I was going. Finally just wanted to be cleaned out and did an enema. But after that constipated again. I went to my doctor and he said Miralax. I swear it made it worse. Now not going at all for the past 4 days. My friend who is nurse suggested Ducolax stool softner. I took yesterday and nothing. What else should I do? I work out and eat gluten-free oatmeal everyday. I also eat fruit and salad for lunch. I don't eat a lot of cheese. This has never happened before. Any suggestions? I am contemplating another enema.

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Sorry you are having this issue as it can be very painful.

I have a few thoughts for you:

(1) have your thyroid checked. (hypothyroidism can cause the big C)

(2) take a mutli-strain probiotic.

(3) a tablespoon of ground flaxseed in 16 oz. of water 2X a day

(4) more water throughout the day

sometimes, it is lack of water, not a lack of fiber.

I am sure others will have more thoughts to offer.

Hope you get relief soon!

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Exercise, oddly enough, helps a lot sometimes. Even if its just a bit more than you do normally. It helps "get things moving" if you will ;)

I would also stay away from anything that might make it worse. Do you drink milk? Eat a lot of starch? Those two can do it.

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If you're still looking for ideas to sift through, a combination of both Malva and Marshmallow root tea has been effective,

along with MSM in this house/family.

~Hope you find relief soon.

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I use miralax daily with good results. Now that being said miralax can be a little tricky. It does not work overnight, it takes 2-3 days for it to start working. If I miss a dose I have to suffer through the 2-3 days again ! I found it works best if taken at night right before bed time with no food afterwards. Only water an plenty of it. You all so may have to adjust the dose, instructions say fill cap to white line. That does not quiet work for me. I use a rounded off cap full, may have to vary a little from instructions.

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Okay, I must say this is a topic I feel I am an expert in. Time to break out the big guns.

First, NO dairy, not even a bite of cheese, until you are regular again.

Second, there are many teas, some were suggested, to drink regularly, when you have it under control, as well as water etc.

Third, one stool softener a day may keep you regular.

Now to activity unclog, so to speak. There are levels to this. Laxatives, different than softeners, including miralax and dulcolax, can be effective if taken, but you may need to take the high end of the dose for it to work. You will know within 24 hours or so if it is working. Your doctor may suggest a higher dose than listed, this is common. Last but not least, and I have had to do this, is the stuff they tell you to get before a colonoscopy. There's one that's in a small bottle, doesn't have to be mixed, tastes ungodly but absolutely effective. Pharmacist can help find it.

Word of caution, laxatives can cause cramping and severe blow outs and in my opinion a last resort. Also, your bowels can become laxative dependent if taken regularly. That's where the more natural approach is better. Don't stop helping things things along until you know for sure you are regular again, then taper to where you are comfortable.

Medications can also cause constipation.

Get to know your bowels and what they are telling you, sounds sick huh?

Good luck to you and always consult your doctor when you need to. Dr Oz does not count.

Colleen

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Hi

A couple of things that can help generally:

Blueberries - a punnet a day for 2-3 days seems to help and not a hardship - yum.

Nuts - if you can tolerate them seem to help.

As mentioned - exercise, especially in the form of long walks.

And I drink hot water - not sure if this actually helps but it feels like it does!

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Another thought. I've heard that mineral oil is a good way to go if you've got C. Not sure if its gluten free or not.

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You could also try cutting out the oats for a while. Some of us react to oats similarly to gluten.

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I completely agree about Miralax! I took it for a week, and had a little relief, but just continued to feel more and more bloated, so I stopped. i have found the most effective combination for myself to be a highly absorbable magnesium supplement, the one i've used is called Super Magnesium and it's gluten free from GNC in addition to Citrucel caplets. I'm currently completing a sitz marker exam, so I stopped both for a few days, but I will continue with them once it's complete. It was definitely improving things, but yet another question came into my head about why I seemed to need so much magnesium when I eat a healthy diet that should be providing me with plenty of magnesium and fiber, and I drink plenty of water with very little caffeinated/sugary beverages!

the usual eat more fiber...drink more water lines just weren't cutting it and then browsing through the forums here someone suggested a magnesium supplement, so at first I started it in high doses and adjusted as necessary and added in the Citrucel since psyllium fiber constipated and bloated me. It's worth a try :)

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pumpkin seeds ( raw , unsalted pre- hulled ),, not kidding ,they are the only thing that has ever worked for me ( and I had tried most of the above mentioned remedys ) . Now I eat a small amount daily .

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pumpkin seeds ( raw , unsalted pre- hulled ),, not kidding ,they are the only thing that has ever worked for me ( and I had tried most of the above mentioned remedys ) . Now I eat a small amount daily .

I agree and I love those for added fiber, too. Great protein. I add those to our granola bars.

Also, to the OP--I had another thought:

I suggest being very careful of using too many OTC bowel cleanses as they can cause some problems, too and make your system reliant on them.

If you already take a calcium supplement, make sure you are taking the right ratio of magnesium. Mag will help with C as well.

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