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Feeling Overwhelmed And Hopeless


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20 replies to this topic

#16 Celiac Mindwarp

 
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Posted 28 January 2013 - 12:35 AM

Oh, and James Welbeloved do gluten-free pet foods. We found it as cheap as what we were using before! From pet shops, and their customer care line is very helpful! Our cat has a new lease of life since we switched her on to it.

If he hasn't finished testing, he should stillbe eating gluten, for both blood tests and biopsy. Your doctor should know this, but mine didn't.
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- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

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#17 CSW

 
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Posted 31 January 2013 - 11:34 AM

As a "spouse of," I just wanted to second the person who pointed out that your life may be about to get A LOT happier...if your husband is a celiac and he stops eating gluten, his personality could change dramatically for the better! So much of the mood swings, anxiety, irritability, etc are caused by the gluten.

I hope you'll also reconsider your position on diet and autism --the jury is really split, but there _is_ significant research showing a high correlation between gluten intolerance and autism, and it's fully possible that your sons could benefit from a gluten-free diet. Having an all gluten-free household is much, much less stressful than trying to keep one person's food safe, too.

Feeling for you and wishing you the best of luck...
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#18 FrumpyWife

 
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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:45 AM

thank you again for all the replies, especially from winwarp and csw :)

putting the boys on a gluten free diet is out of the question, their diet is so very limited as it is, so messing around with those foods they DO eat, would not be a good idea :) we have discussed the varies diet "fads" that surface at length with their paed. psychiatrist in the past and we concluded with him and our dietician, that the benefits are far too anecdotal to put any serious weight on them.

i am still undecided as to how we are going to move forward... personally i feel that it is too much for me to handle, i could not forgive myself if my husband got sick because of my inability to keep his food/environment clean. we will have a few weeks before he gets the results, one of the few drawbacks of the NHS.. everything takes a long time, from initial appointments to getting results.

if we do decide to try carrying on living together, i am sure i will have to be back and figure out what he can and cant come in contact with...

thank you all once again for the replies, encouragement and experiences you have shared with me.
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#19 Celiac Mindwarp

 
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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:36 AM

Glad it was helpful. There are some good folks here, be sure to come by for any advice.
Lots of people use the time testing to get their heads around the new diet. It does all start to sink in after a few weeks.

BTW, I picked up a copy of Living Gluten Free for Dummies in the Works this week for £5.99 instead of £15.99. It is pretty good mostly. Not sure if there is one near you, and their stock is a bit random, but you might be lucky :)
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- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

#20 cap6

 
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Posted 03 February 2013 - 11:23 AM

Just going to throw in my 2 cents here.......
check out grain free dog food. We use Natural Balance for our puppies and don't have to worry about doggy kisses.
Everyone has to work it out for themself but to me separate kitchens just don't work well. Gluen Free cereal is cheap, eggs, potatoes, rice, quinoa, veggies, fruit, cheese all cheap. It's the speciality food that get you and they really aren't that good for you anyway. Throw chicken in the crock pot and it's a cheap meal. So many main stream foods are now gluten free. Sauces and that sort of thing. Learning to read ingredients is exhausting but in time becomes easier. My rule any more is more than four or five ingredients and I don't want it.
No judgements on you, none! I remeber standing in the kitchen sobbing and saying that I was going to pitch a tent in the back yeard and go live out there so I wouldn't be a burden. Dramatic wasn't it?! But that's how I felt. Try, if you can, to get some sleep, take all of this a little at a time. You can't learn and do it all overnight. Someone once told me that one day I would wake up and find that all of this was second nature. I rolled my eyes and thought "Never"! But ....... she was right. Being the resistent and subborn person that I am it took me awhile. :)
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#21 CommonTater

 
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Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:18 PM

My husband and I can't afford to make separate meals so I understand. In the beginning I was overwhelmed but there are LOTS of things you can buy that are gluten free that aren't special. Use your computer and look at items to make a shopping list. We know Most of the brands of items that are safe to buy. There are lots of cereals that say Gluten Free. Most meats are safe, just make sure you buy meats that don't have sauces etc on them. For instance, canned beef in gravy isn't safe.

If you want to know what kind of hot dog is gluten free, just goggle it, We buy Nathan's brand. Read labels, ask here or google brands that contain no gluten. Fresh Fruits and Veggies are safe, most frozen and canned, just look at the labels. After a few weeks it'll come easy. A lot of gluten free foods are regular foods, I would say bread is the big exception. My husband eats what i eat except for bread, he eats the real thing, I eat Gluten free when I eat bread.
I certainly don't suffer from being denied anything and you can do it on a budget.

We have found that that a lot of prepared packaged foods do contain gluten but it's easy to do things on your own without all the preservatives. If you need a recipe for something just google, gluten free whatever it is and read the reviews on it.

I know what snacks I can eat and what I can't eat. Lays plain Frito's and plain Chips are safe. There are lots of others.

There are some great regular cookies you can make that don't contain flour that we ate before I had to go gluten free.

You can also buy Brown Rice- Rice Krispies now to make Rice Krispy treats and they are gluten free, states it on front of Box. They taste Exactly like the regular Rice Krispys.



Since I live in bed and have a lot of time on my hands, I would be glad to help you with a shopping list of gluten free brands of food if you'll send me a list of items you would need to buy.

Terms That Mean Gluten On Food Labels

The following terms represent the most commonly used Latin terms for wheat, barley and rye. If you see any of these, the product contains gluten:
  • Triticum vulgare (wheat)
  • Triticale (cross between wheat and rye)
  • Hordeum vulgare (barley)
  • Secale cereale (rye)
  • Triticum spelta (spelt, a form of wheat)
Ingredients That Always Contain Gluten

The following terms represent ingredients that always contain gluten:
  • Wheat protein/hydrolyzed wheat protein
  • Wheat starch/hydrolyzed wheat starch
  • Wheat flour/bread flour/bleached flour
  • Bulgur (a form of wheat)
  • Malt (made from barley)
  • Couscous (made from wheat)
  • Farina (made from wheat)
  • Pasta (made from wheat unless otherwise indicated)
  • Seitan (made from wheat gluten and commonly used in vegetarian meals)
  • Wheat or barley grass (will be cross contaminated)
  • Wheat germ oil or extract (will be cross contaminated)
Ingredients That May Contain Gluten

Depending on the source, all of these ingredients potentially can contain gluten. The FDA does require food manufacturers to declare wheat-containing ingredients on their labels. However, other gluten-containing grains potentially could be used to make some of these ingredients.
You'll need to check with the manufacturer to find out for certain whether or not a food that includes one or more of these ingredients is safe on a gluten-free diet.
  • Vegetable protein/hydrolyzed vegetable protein (can come from wheat, corn or soy)
  • Modified starch/modified food starch (can come from several sources, including wheat)
  • Natural flavor/natural flavoring (can come from barley)
  • Artificial flavor/artificial flavoring (can come from barley)
  • Caramel color (now considered a safe ingredient, but if you're in doubt, check with the manufacturer)
  • Modified food starch
  • Hydrolyzed plant protein/HPP
  • Hydrolyzed vegetable protein/HVP
  • Seasonings
  • Flavorings
  • Vegetable starch
  • Dextrin and Maltodextrin (both sometimes made from wheat)

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After many years of suffering from Late Stage Lyme Disease I became Gluten intolerant and I'm extremely sensitive.





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